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Size Of Flats

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I have noticed that whereas people in the UK are not generally well informed about the actual size of a flat, for people on the continent it seems to be the primary piece of information when buying or selling. Why do you think that is?

More importantly, what do you consider to be the minimum adequate size in square meters for:

(a) a studio;

(B) a one bed flat;

© a two bed flat;

(d) a three bed house.

Does anyone know of a website which compares the average sizes of these across Europe?

Thanks

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I have noticed that whereas people in the UK are not generally well informed about the actual size of a flat, for people on the continent it seems to be the primary piece of information when buying or selling. Why do you think that is?

because people here generally have the maths ability of a 5 year old? The EAs would never understand the concept of sq. ft or sq.m anyway.

More importantly, what do you consider to be the minimum adequate size in square meters for:

(a) a studio;

(B) a one bed flat;

© a two bed flat;

(d) a three bed house.

Studio: these should not be allowed to be built.

One bed: Living room (12 ft * 15ft) = 180

Bedroom (12 ft * 15ft) = 180

kitchen (12 * 15 ft) = 180 (i.e. with room for a table to eat at)

Bathroom (8 * 8) = 64

hallway (12 *4) = 48

STORAGE = 65 (10% of floorspace - neglected usually but essential)

Total = 717 sq. ft.

Two bed flat: one bed plus an additional bedroom = 897 sq. ft

Three bed house: Two bed plus additional bed, plus extra toilet (25 sq. ft) plus extra living room = 1300 sq. ft.

I think these should be enforced as a minimum requirement. Anything else is simply poor quality housing, for which there is no excuse.

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I have noticed that whereas people in the UK are not generally well informed about the actual size of a flat, for people on the continent it seems to be the primary piece of information when buying or selling. Why do you think that is?

More importantly, what do you consider to be the minimum adequate size in square meters for:

(a) a studio;

(B) a one bed flat;

© a two bed flat;

(d) a three bed house.

Does anyone know of a website which compares the average sizes of these across Europe?

Thanks

I have often wondered about why people don't consider this myself.

It seems that what sells a property is the number of rooms it has even where it is blatantly obvious that one room has been split into two.

I am sure there was also some sort of measurement of the smallest size a space could be before it qualified as a room (rather than a cupboard).

Although now that I think about it I think that was part of a report on overcrowding.

Anyway how small can a room be before you can't call it a room anymore, does this depend on what sort of room it is ie. bathroom may have different minimum size to a bedroom.

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I have often wondered about why people don't consider this myself.

It seems that what sells a property is the number of rooms it has even where it is blatantly obvious that one room has been split into two.

I am sure there was also some sort of measurement of the smallest size a space could be before it qualified as a room (rather than a cupboard).

Although now that I think about it I think that was part of a report on overcrowding.

Anyway how small can a room be before you can't call it a room anymore, does this depend on what sort of room it is ie. bathroom may have different minimum size to a bedroom.

I remember there's some rule that if something doesn't get natural light it can't be called a bedroom. Problem for some basement flats. Are these rules part of some building code?

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I remember there's some rule that if something doesn't get natural light it can't be called a bedroom. Problem for some basement flats. Are these rules part of some building code?

I am still looking for the classification of what can and can't be called a room / bedroom.

This is interesting as part of that discussion:

The present standards for statutory overcrowding are found in part ten of the 1985 Housing Act but were brought there, unchanged, from the 1957 Housing Act which in itself was merely a repetition of the Housing Act 1935.
This Act states that two adults of the opposite sex who are not married or cohabiting should not have to live in the same room. However, residents under 10 years old are not counted and living rooms and kitchens are classed as suitable rooms to sleep in.
A secondary measurement of overcrowding involves a crude numbers game where the number of adults per room forms the basis. Broadly speaking one room is deemed suitable for two adults, two rooms suitable for three adults and three rooms suitable for five.
Yet, again, there are clauses that mean while an adult counts as 'one', children under ten equal a 'half' and babies under one don't count at all. Again living rooms and kitchens are often counted as rooms.
This definition wasn't accepted sitting down by some politicians at the time never mind many today and, in practice, by the 1960s and 1970s the so-called 'bedroom standard' gradually become the way local authorities, and later the Survey of English Housing, monitored overcrowding. Under this system everyone in a household, including babies, are counted while living rooms and kitchens are not considered rooms suitable for sleeping in.
The statistics speak for themselves when today's estimates suggest that roughly 20,000 households are overcrowded by 1935 standards, while over half a million are overcrowded under the bedroom standard.

As regards the natural light issue that appears to be covered under the fitness for human habitation legislation. See below:

The standard of fitness for human habitation is laid down in section 604 of the Housing Act 1985, as amended, and is set out below. This standard applies to all dwelling-houses.
1. The house must be structurally stable.
2. The house must be free from serious disrepair and otherwise be in a reasonable state of repair having regard to its age, character and its locality and not detrimentally affect the health, safety or welfare of the occupants.
3. The house must be free from dampness prejudicial to the health of the occupants.
4. All habitable rooms shall have as adequate level of natural lighting. As a general guide the total size of glazed openings should not be less than 1/10th of the floor area. Each room, kitchen, bathroom, water closet compartment and stairway must be provided with adequate artificial lighting.
5. The house must have adequate provision for heating.
6. The house must have adequate provision for ventilation. As a general guide the total size of window openings should not be less than 1/20th of the floor area. Where it is not practicable to provide natural ventilation in a kitchen, bathroom or water closet compartment adequate ventilation by mechanical means will be acceptable. In a bathroom or water closet the mechanical ventilation shall provide a minimum of three air changes per hour operated from the lighting circuit of the room and fitted with a 20 minute overrun. For kitchens, mechanical ventilation providing one air change per hour will be deemed sufficient
7. The house must be provided with an adequate piped supply of wholesome water.
8. The house must be provided with satisfactory facilities for the preparation and cooking of food.
9. Suitably located water closets, baths/showers and wash-hand basins must be provided.
10. The house must be provided with an effective drainage system for the draining of foul, waste and surface water.

I have to say that my first impressions of why people have fairly low or no standards regarding the size of a property and its rooms may be in some way connected to the low levels at which the law establishs standards.

Is it possible that in other countries people pay more attention to the size of the property in square feet due to a difference in legislation and consequently housing culture?

I have found the details regarding the sizes of rooms considered adequate for bedrooms (although bizarrely as I understand it these rooms can be kitchens etc. and still qualify) the bedroom should not measure less than 50 square feet.

A room measuring between 50 and 70 square feet is considered a suitable bedroom for a child under 10.

70 - 90 square feet suitable for one adult

110 square feet or more two adults.

Edited by underpressuretobuy

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I remember there's some rule that if something doesn't get natural light it can't be called a bedroom. Problem for some basement flats. Are these rules part of some building code?

I read the requirements somewhere too - I think it was to do with size - possibly had to be bigger than something like 8ft x 6ft. Anything smaller is therefore usually referred to as a study. Not that this is actually very big - anything smaller should be referred to as a cupboard.

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I have noticed that whereas people in the UK are not generally well informed about the actual size of a flat, for people on the continent it seems to be the primary piece of information when buying or selling. Why do you think that is?

More importantly, what do you consider to be the minimum adequate size in square meters for:

(a) a studio;

(B) a one bed flat;

© a two bed flat;

(d) a three bed house.

Does anyone know of a website which compares the average sizes of these across Europe?

Thanks

Apologies but I can't find anything anywhere on this and I personally think that this is an important question in deciding whether people will be getting value for money when they do eventually buy.

If anyone else can find any information on this it would be useful.

Why does everyone worry about getting onto the property ladder without a second thought as to the size and quality of the property they end up with?

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I too think it is ridiculous that house get priced on number of bedrooms. I converted the loft in my house, and because of the nature of the house, there was space to squeeze in two rooms. The guy who did the drawings turned up and sketched a two-room layout (plus one en-suite) before asking what I wanted. He assumed I wanted to add value (to my family home!) rather than create a nice living space (the final single room is not gigantic, just a decent size).

I notice that other places like mine are advertised as 5 bed homes, but it can only be by the two-rooms-in-the-loft strategy.

In London many estate agents are creating floor-plans of houses for sale (because the selling fee is so large they can easily afford the extra expense) but although the total area is often given on the floor-plan, it is rarely used in the marketing.

Edited by rockdoctor

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Apologies but I can't find anything anywhere on this and I personally think that this is an important question in deciding whether people will be getting value for money when they do eventually buy.

If anyone else can find any information on this it would be useful.

Why does everyone worry about getting onto the property ladder without a second thought as to the size and quality of the property they end up with?

Thanks for the info.

I think that if those new Home Seller Packs were required to specify the price per square foot / meter, that would swiftly bring about a cultural change.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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