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Boomers and their haemorrhoids


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23 minutes ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

GenX is pissed at having its ability to save for retirement clobbered by the Government through higher taxes, capped allowances and then being asked to wait until 67.

GenX has a golden opportunity to save for retirement right this minute with tax free pension contributions up to £40k. As clobberings go it's a pretty gentle one.

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37 minutes ago, Si1 said:

Yeah. I don't mind that the accident has happened, I can see why noone really meant it twenty years ago.

But the utter lack of empathy or responsibility, the dog in the manger politics of transference of guilt to the victims, which you haven't done obviously Greg, is shocking. There's no good reason why steps shouldn't be being taken to even things out now. But with the triple lock and the new national insurance supplement it's clear that they're not. This govt don't even barely recognise it. Not a little bit.

Totally agree and I think you have seen my views a goodly proportion of my generation are greedy F3cks it is depressing 

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1 hour ago, GregBowman said:

Well lets get real then if we are the generation of takers ( too wide a generalisation, like all millennials eat too much smashed avocado so can’t afford a flat deposit ) give tax breaks to private health care and private education to encourage a wider take up and reduce the burden on the state 

I don’t agree with the care tax either just give me the ability to pay a one off fee £50k+ to insure against it. 
 

You can already hear the howls of protest against a two tier society 

UK has always been two tier. It's just going back to proles having nothing now.

Private education already has massive tax breaks (they don't pay it, as they're charities).

Plenty of other tricks we all use to negate tax when sending kids to school (my grandkids fees are paid through a company I think).

https://www.theprivateoffice.com/insights/claim-tax-relief-private-school-fees

Private healthcare is more complicated in the UK, but our system here basically just allows you to queue jump for a fee or see specialists faster. Not sure that needs a tax break tbh - I've always felt really lucky I can afford to do this, especially how bad it's got this past decade or so.

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24 minutes ago, Bruce Banner said:

I'm ten years older and started work on my 15th birthday but otherwise similar.

I hate being nannied and would rather die than end up in a care home....... seriously.

As for care home tax, the problem is that the NHS is judged on quantity, not quality, of life so people are outliving their brains and all the money has been spent getting them to that point.

Yep same here, we need a more elegant discussion about this along the dignitas lines.

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Just now, byron78 said:

UK has always been two tier. It's just going back to proles having nothing now.

I read an article 15 years ago that said the late 20th century was an aberration, the model will go back to the norm fairly quickly - it's not a new concept  

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Just now, GregBowman said:

I read an article 15 years ago that said the late 20th century was an aberration, the model will go back to the norm fairly quickly - it's not a new concept  

I think that's probably fair. You lot simply wouldn't have had what you had without that little Austrian painter bugger!

Masses seem to have been convinced to flog it all off and go back to where we were.

The reds under the bed fear over here has always been very very high too of course. In general, media usually does a brilliant job of helping keep us Tories in power.

still remember the shock of Churchill losing the election after the war and the UK going full socialism. My family honestly believed we'd be strung up and our land carved up and distributed to Bolsheviks within a few years! ;)

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1 hour ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

Good points.

I see this nannying behaviour in my wife, right now we have a 17 year old cat that clearly had an issue either with diabetes or its kidneys as it started drinking gallons and urinating copiously -  fortunately still in its litter tray. But she takes it to the vet, and rather than have it put down, spends the best part of £2k having it stabilised on a drip and then it comes home and needs twice daily insulin injections.

In my book that is ridiculous, I actually stopped paying for pet insurance 6 years ago as once cats approach 10 the prices rocket. It actually cost more to cover 2 cats than for the 4 humans in the house.

 

...and there are still loons here saying they'd prefer the Insurance model for Healthcare - I wonder where they are in terms of need?

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1 hour ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

 

A good summary.

Much is self inflicted though the tricks to sell addiction are at fault too.

The trouble is the bottomless pit is not viable. Looking at the Covid booster stats, 32m are eligible. Whilst some of those might be 56 year old boomers still working and a few with health issues that are working, it is clear  that in 5 years time the UK will be stuffed!

Why do we sell addiction, because there is plenty of 'wealth' to be made from it........like Covid has been lucrative to some and the death of others........one thing the young do have over the old is their resistance to viruses and time....if they want a longer healthier life there are ways they can do it for free, good music, love, faith and exercise.;)

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3 hours ago, Si1 said:

The financial statistics behind the boomers show they have been taking their whole generational life.

During their peak earning years, owing to the previous and following generations being smaller, they had a much lower tax burden to pay for other non earning generations' needs. The actual statistics behind how much more money the boomers have taken out then put in are startling. Now they want the triple lock pension, propped up house prices, free care homes paid for by the working poor Yadda Yadda. The more you give them the more they want.

I help run a retail outlet, and the worst demographic are the 50-70 year old males who come just to browse. Yes there are exceptions, but if you want a customer who only spends 50p-£1, or doesn't spend a money, nine times out of ten it will be someone from this group. Surprisingly the biggest spenders tend to be young women 20-35 year old. I say surprisingly as their rent or mortgage bills in this area must be sky-high.

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39 minutes ago, msi said:

...and there are still loons here saying they'd prefer the Insurance model for Healthcare - I wonder where they are in terms of need?

Perhaps I'm a loon because I think that one of the benefits of an insurance based model for healthcare is that those who want to extend their lives regardless, have to pay for that privilege.

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30 minutes ago, Trampa501 said:

I help run a retail outlet, and the worst demographic are the 50-70 year old males who come just to browse. Yes there are exceptions, but if you want a customer who only spends 50p-£1, or doesn't spend a money, nine times out of ten it will be someone from this group. Surprisingly the biggest spenders tend to be young women 20-35 year old. I say surprisingly as their rent or mortgage bills in this area must be sky-high.

I suppose the under 50s are more likely to browse on the web

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26 minutes ago, Bruce Banner said:

Perhaps I'm a loon because I think that one of the benefits of an insurance based model for healthcare is that those who want to extend their lives regardless, have to pay for that privilege.

All treatment needs to be paid for, what I don't get is the vitriol against pooling together (and paying) on a national level  than any insurance based model.  You get a higher level of cover against a lower per capita cost.

 

The loon idea is saying you need to pick up the entire cost - and I don't think you are suggesting a Stage4 Cancer patient should pay for their 'privilege' of walking on the Earth

 

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2 minutes ago, msi said:

All treatment needs to be paid for, what I don't get is the vitriol against pooling together (and paying) on a national level  than any insurance based model.  You get a higher level of cover against a lower per capita cost.

 

The loon idea is saying you need to pick up the entire cost - and I don't think you are suggesting a Stage4 Cancer patient should pay for their 'privilege' of walking on the Earth

 

That depends on their age. If close to natural end of life I'd say yes, palliative care only unless payed for. 

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4 minutes ago, Bruce Banner said:

That depends on their age. If close to natural end of life I'd say yes, palliative care only unless payed for. 

That's what is happening already.

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1 hour ago, Trampa501 said:

I help run a retail outlet, and the worst demographic are the 50-70 year old males who come just to browse. Yes there are exceptions, but if you want a customer who only spends 50p-£1, or doesn't spend a money, nine times out of ten it will be someone from this group. Surprisingly the biggest spenders tend to be young women 20-35 year old. I say surprisingly as their rent or mortgage bills in this area must be sky-high.

Worse for whom?  The environment?  The young women up to their necks in debt?

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11 minutes ago, Bruce Banner said:

In which case an insurance based scheme might be better for those wanting to extend life for as long as possible?

That is probably happening already as well.

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Just now, Bruce Banner said:

So insurance based scheme should replace NI contributions and NHS?

Please do not put words into my mouth.  I never said nor implied that.  I am merely stating that some people do have private medical insurance and thereby will have access to more extended medical procedures than those that don't.

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1 hour ago, msi said:

All treatment needs to be paid for, what I don't get is the vitriol against pooling together (and paying) on a national level  than any insurance based model.  You get a higher level of cover against a lower per capita cost.

 

The loon idea is saying you need to pick up the entire cost - and I don't think you are suggesting a Stage4 Cancer patient should pay for their 'privilege' of walking on the Earth

 

Who needs treatment when there are those that are paid to prescribe pain killers.;)

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3 minutes ago, kzb said:

Please do not put words into my mouth.  I never said nor implied that.  I am merely stating that some people do have private medical insurance and thereby will have access to more extended medical procedures than those that don't.

I wasn't putting words into your moth, rather posing the question. I had private medical insurance when I was working, but there was no discount on NI payments so I paid twice.

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