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Leading Economic Indicator Points Down

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http://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/skirtlengththeory.asp

The idea that skirt lengths are a predictor of the stock market direction. According to the theory, if skirts are short, it means the markets are going up. And if skirt are long, it means the markets are heading down.
The idea behind this theory is that shorter skirts tend to appear in times when general consumer confidence and excitement is high, meaning the markets are bullish. In contrast, the theory says long skirts are worn more in times of fear and general gloom, indicating that things are bearish.
Although some investors may secretly believe in such a theory, serious analysts and investors - instead of examining skirt length to make investment decisions - insist on focusing on market fundamentals and data.

Noticed how long skirts are these days with the advent of the "gypsy" look. How reliable is this as an indicator? I remember skirt lengths were super long during the "Big Crash" in the late 70's and during most of the "Great Crash" of the early 90's. Very short during the recovery in the late 60's and especially during the early years of Gordon's "economic miracle" when HPI was being stoked up by his irrational exhuberance for high house prices and low IR.

What do you think? Are skirt lengths a reliable indicator?

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I general yes I think the theory is sound enough, there are still a lot of short skirt around though. I guess when they are up to a certain point skirts can only get longer :)

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Maybe skirts are getting long because it's winter.

:rolleyes:

Stores usually buy in a season ahead of time. When I go shopping with the trouble and strife I notice the racks are full of very long skirts--actually quite nice with the Spanish style ruffles and Hippie look of the 70's. Not so sure its the Vic Feather therefore.

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http://www.investopedia.com/terms/s/skirtlengththeory.asp

The idea that skirt lengths are a predictor of the stock market direction. According to the theory, if skirts are short, it means the markets are going up. And if skirt are long, it means the markets are heading down.
The idea behind this theory is that shorter skirts tend to appear in times when general consumer confidence and excitement is high, meaning the markets are bullish. In contrast, the theory says long skirts are worn more in times of fear and general gloom, indicating that things are bearish.
Although some investors may secretly believe in such a theory, serious analysts and investors - instead of examining skirt length to make investment decisions - insist on focusing on market fundamentals and data.

Noticed how long skirts are these days with the advent of the "gypsy" look. How reliable is this as an indicator? I remember skirt lengths were super long during the "Big Crash" in the late 70's and during most of the "Great Crash" of the early 90's. Very short during the recovery in the late 60's and especially during the early years of Gordon's "economic miracle" when HPI was being stoked up by his irrational exhuberance for high house prices and low IR.

What do you think? Are skirt lengths a reliable indicator?

I prefer the 'knickerless theory' as a definitive indicator.

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I prefer the 'knickerless theory' as a definitive indicator.

That was characteristic of the late 60's with the advent of the "drawless wonders." These ultra mini-skirted wearers would tend sit on the sideways facing seat on buses and disturb other passengers causing male old age pensioners to swallow their false teeth.

My question is whether the growing length of skirts is an indicator that the economy is headed down. Some say its the most reliable indicatyor there is as it reflects female perception of how things are. The 60's were a time of not giving a sod one way or the other hence the "drawless wonders."

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I'd be interested to hear from our female contributors on this. Do rising house prices and lower unemployment make women feel sexier?

LOL, nope but the theory isn't about "sexiness" its about fashion :)

Sadly I am not a dedicated follower of fashion and tend to go for what suits me rather than what the rest of the world says is the in look, not everyone can or should wear mini skirts but then again not everyone can pull off the gypsy long skirt look.

Personally I tend to go for knee length which is "in between" neither long nor short ............

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I'd be interested to hear from our female contributors on this. Do rising house prices and lower unemployment make women feel sexier?

lol! No! It depends how confident we're feeling about our legs rather than the economy! About this stage after Christmas, it's probably safe to wear shorter styles but with opaque tights for the over 16s! :):lol:

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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