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Shamus

Bbc News: Debt 'does Not Cause Break-ups'

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At these house prices I guess they need to!!

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<<<Nearly 80% said they would forgive a partner who confessed to building up large debts and would help them to sort out their finances.

Credit monitoring service MyCallcredit says it indicates Britons are becoming more comfortable with debt. >>>

...my take on this is what people say they will do but when faced with the harsh reality itself is quite different and is what contributes to tipping most relationships over the edge...

In summary it's more spin from the media to say everyone go out this weekend, consume more and buy houses...! We can all deal with the consequences...! Can't we?

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I think this is bunkem.

People pick partners because of a combination of fancying them and thinking they will have a good life together , a mixture of fun, comfort, trust.

Considering the ability for money to make life more comfortable, its easy to see why so many ugly millionaires have great looking wives.

If you perceived that your own wealth prospects would be harmed by taking on a partner's debt it may make you wonder whether its such a good idea overtime. You might eventually justify your decision based on vague notions that you can't forgive them for their general lack of respect for money, the relationship, its a matter of a lack of trust etc.

This story is just an attempt by people worried about debt to reassure us all its now ok. That debt is normal. Its not, its painful.

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I think this is total rubbish too, compare the amount of stress placed on a partnership from debt compared to being solvent. And we all must know couples who have split up after the kids come along. Stress weighs heavily on romance.

Mind you, a mate who had a failed business venture, who is now 20k in debt as a result, merely shrugs it off saying 'well, it's no more than the average student debt'. O. That's ok then :o and anyway, he mentioned he was having marriage troubles the other week <_<

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I have been in massive debt £40k + (which actually did me a huge favour because it forced me to sell my BTL in 2004 :) ) but that caused huge amounts of stress and we had a good way out, imagine if you didn't and one partner was entirely to blame, not many marriages can survive that kind of pressure these days.

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MENTALLY ILL BROADCAST EXAMPLE 2

Another example of the BBC going into ACTIVE DENIAL.

The dark unconscious of the caught-out BBC.

This is the worst form of behaviour in my opinion. Refusing to admit mistakes and instead, stubbornly perpetuating the damage to prove you are right. I find that unforgiveable. The first time I saw it was yesterday (thanks SarahBell for the string - nice catch)

Pay Off Mortgage In 2 Years on now

The BBC are becoming like the bloke that beats his wife and then when confronted gets a stupid, sly grin on his face, denies it and then says shes a clumsy cow but to help he's paying for her to go to a diet class.

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The cold harsh reality is that UK divorce rates soared during the last housing crash. No doubt, the same thing will happen again this time.

Absolutely correct. Unfortunately Broadcasting doesn't concern itself with fact but rather selective public sentiment based on little experience. Maybe if they had restricted their survey to those who were adults during the last crash, rather than the 20s and 30s (their preferred demographic) they might have got a very different result. 20s and 30s might THINK they feel comfortable with debt, but that is before the baliff comes and takes away the high fi system and the record CD collection and the judge declares that the bank can turf them out and sell off their home for a loss and keep a debt against them for the difference.

I remember this sort of argument in the mid 80s when I was but a slip of a thing and I couldn't see why someone over 40 might have a better insight. There were people then that remembered the great depression and used to collect string (most of them are dead now).

Change is inevitable but everything stays the same!!!

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We have a generation in the UK now, in their 20s and 30s, who have never known an economic downturn let alone a full blow recession like we had in the 1980s. These people will be particularly badly hurt in the next 5 years methinks.

My Mum still reuses old envelopes because she remembers the 1930s and 1940s. She won't throw anything away and that is typical of people of her generation.

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This article is a load of rubbish.

I could just imagine people being stopped in the street and being asked "Would you break up with your partner if they lied about their debt?". The chap, turns to look at his wife (who's now a little red in the face), and says "no, don't be silly!"

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This is bad news, we need ever increasing new divorces in order to prop up the market. The market is an insidious beast, first it thawts the young and hopeful and now it needs to break up marriages to sustain itself.

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...................................................f**ks sake!

It's OK everyone else is doing it!

Perpetual debt subsistence is becoming endemic in the so called developed world. Which is just as well because if this was not the case little trade would take place and GDP would vanish.

There are, I believe, and have been told, countries where the general consensus is that money should be accumulated before it is spent.

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Guest Charlie The Tramp
Research from AXA shows money worries are a significant cause of worry, anxiety and stress according to GP and leading mental health expert, Dr Roger Henderson, who recently published a paper identifying the condition Money Sickness Syndrome (MSS). Almost half (43%) of the UK adult population is affected by money worries and have experienced MSS symptoms. 3.8m people admit money worries have caused them to take time off work and more than 10.76m people suffer relationship problems because of money worries, with almost one in five complaining of a sex life slump.

PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC) insolvency experts looked at 80% of the IVA applications made in July 2005. 75% of the debtors put down "living beyond their means" as the main reason for being in trouble. Only 20% said they had lost their jobs or had suffered a breakdown in their marriages - two of the events traditionally assumed most likely to trigger personal insolvency.

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  • 337 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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