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Realistbear

Crunch In Law For The Rental Market

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http://uk.biz.yahoo.com/060209/250/g3el8.html

Thursday February 9, 08:05 AM

Crunch in Law for the Rental Market

LONDON, February 9 /PRNewswire/ -- This year is a crunch year for the rental market, as it
must implement the requirements of the Housing Act and the Disability Discrimination Act 2005
and, at the Annual Conference of the Association of Residential
Letting Agents, ARLA, in London this week, delegates were asked if they are ready.
In addition to licensing, a new regime - the Housing Health and Safety Rating System - will come into force to
monitor housing standards
. This will enable local authorities to check for the obvious poor standards - in hygiene and in sanitation. However, there are a total of
29 hazards
. They range from the danger of explosion or structural collapse to the potential hazard of a glass panel at the bottom of stairs.
There is more time to prepare for the Disability Discrimination Act. That does not come into force until December, the Conference was told.
However, suggesting that
landlords should already be working towards implementation of the Act
, Simon Pickering, Practice Development Officer for the Disability Rights Commission, started by defining disability discrimination. He said it is defined as treating a person less favourably because of a disability.
"Landlords and letting agents cannot refuse a tenant because of disability and may have to make changes to their rental practices and to
provide auxiliary services
," he warned.

It would appear that the new regulations will have a significant negative financial impact on the BTL market.

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http://uk.biz.yahoo.com/060209/250/g3el8.html

Thursday February 9, 08:05 AM

Crunch in Law for the Rental Market

LONDON, February 9 /PRNewswire/ -- This year is a crunch year for the rental market, as it
must implement the requirements of the Housing Act and the Disability Discrimination Act 2005
and, at the Annual Conference of the Association of Residential
Letting Agents, ARLA, in London this week, delegates were asked if they are ready.
In addition to licensing, a new regime - the Housing Health and Safety Rating System - will come into force to
monitor housing standards
. This will enable local authorities to check for the obvious poor standards - in hygiene and in sanitation. However, there are a total of
29 hazards
. They range from the danger of explosion or structural collapse to the potential hazard of a glass panel at the bottom of stairs.
There is more time to prepare for the Disability Discrimination Act. That does not come into force until December, the Conference was told.
However, suggesting that
landlords should already be working towards implementation of the Act
, Simon Pickering, Practice Development Officer for the Disability Rights Commission, started by defining disability discrimination. He said it is defined as treating a person less favourably because of a disability.
"Landlords and letting agents cannot refuse a tenant because of disability and may have to make changes to their rental practices and to
provide auxiliary services
," he warned.

It would appear that the new regulations will have a significant negative financial impact on the BTL market.

What a ****** Law. Does this mean every rental propery HAS to have a Stanna Stairlift installed? And specialist disabled toilet and bath facilities? This government really needs to draw the line between what is fair and what is practical. :angry:

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What a ****** Law. Does this mean every rental propery HAS to have a Stanna Stairlift installed? And specialist disabled toilet and bath facilities? This government really needs to draw the line between what is fair and what is practical. :angry:

The BTL market in the UK is remarkably unregulated. IN the US for example there are strict codes that have to be adhered to including access for disabled. Now that BTL is a big industry in the UK brought about by Gordon's "economic miracle" of cheap credit fuelling the world's biggest housing bubble the industry must be treated as such. Everything has its price.

Edited by Realistbear

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The BTL market in the UK is remarkably unregulated. IN the US for example there are strict codes that have to be adhered to including access for disabled. Now that BTL is a big industry in the UK brought about by Gordon's "economic miracle" of cheap credit fuelling the world's biggest housing bubble the industry must be treated as such. Everything has its price.

i agree it's about time landlords were regulated,we have had our bathroom ceiling replaced twice and are about to have our kitchen ceiling replaced (through the insurance-thankfully),due to students renting the flat above.the worse time was when one came home drunk at 3am and decided to run a bath then fell asleep!i've often desired a kebab when drunk but never a bath !

the cowboy landlord has changed his phone number for 3rd time as he's sick of us phoning to complain,so now we have no contact number for emergencies.

now landlords will have to register with the city council (they couldn't run a p1sh up in a brewery but it's a start).

http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5048728.html

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So someone turning up in a wheelchair to rent a property could legally demand the house be converted so they can live in it, otherwise its discrimination? :o Surely not? :lol:

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So someone turning up in a wheelchair to rent a property could legally demand the house be converted so they can live in it, otherwise its discrimination? :o Surely not? :lol:

As a disabled person I feel throughly discriminated against. Fancy not been abled / allowed to rent a half derelict dump for a stupid rent. :lol::lol:

So all we need now is for a bunch of us to go around in wheelchairs demanding that properties be fitted with disabled access and down stars bathrooms with wheelchair access. That should keep the builders busy for years.

It'll kick the stuffing out of the BTL market though! I knew I'd have my uses one day. :lol::lol:

Edited by FTBagain

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Yes I'm disabled too. Disabled from being able to buy a f**ing house for a reasonable price. :huh: at least until the spontaneous remission of a hpc heals me :D

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i agree it's about time landlords were regulated,we have had our bathroom ceiling replaced twice and are about to have our kitchen ceiling replaced (through the insurance-thankfully),due to students renting the flat above.the worse time was when one came home drunk at 3am and decided to run a bath then fell asleep!i've often desired a kebab when drunk but never a bath !

the cowboy landlord has changed his phone number for 3rd time as he's sick of us phoning to complain,so now we have no contact number for emergencies.

now landlords will have to register with the city council (they couldn't run a p1sh up in a brewery but it's a start).

http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5048728.html

Roger you fool, you speak of bad building design and bad TENANT behavior as if it's the landlords fault! That's it, regulate the ******* landlord who should have been round in 5 to turn off that tenants tap for them!

Better building regulations, adhered to by all citizens, would address this problem much better than your suggestion. Landlords are an easy target for govt to pick on. What in effect is happening, is tenants are getting better & better protection from accidents in their homes, whilst the average citizen is free to do almost whatever they like in their own homes, creating dangers for themselves and their neighbours. If a landlord buys their property, they take over many of these problems without realising it & idiots in govt think they should be punished for that.

As a minimum requirement to sort out the problem that you described (that has little to do with the landlord), the building regs should stipulate wet rooms in all bathroom replacements in the future. What is a wet room I hear you ask? It's a room that has a drain in the floor, to drain away any floods & therefore contain the damage caused by carelessness of the TENANT.

Insurance companies could also help in this by refusing to insure badly designed bathrooms.

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Roger you fool, you speak of bad building design and bad TENANT behavior as if it's the landlords fault! That's it, regulate the ******* landlord who should have been round in 5 to turn off that tenants tap for them!

Better building regulations, adhered to by all citizens, would address this problem much better than your suggestion. Landlords are an easy target for govt to pick on. What in effect is happening, is tenants are getting better & better protection from accidents in their homes, whilst the average citizen is free to do almost whatever they like in their own homes, creating dangers for themselves and their neighbours. If a landlord buys their property, they take over many of these problems without realising it & idiots in govt think they should be punished for that.

As a minimum requirement to sort out the problem that you described (that has little to do with the landlord), the building regs should stipulate wet rooms in all bathroom replacements in the future. What is a wet room I hear you ask? It's a room that has a drain in the floor, to drain away any floods & therefore contain the damage caused by carelessness of the TENANT.

Insurance companies could also help in this by refusing to insure badly designed bathrooms.

Translation: "please don't screw any more money out of me, what with my impending massive capital losses!".

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Yes I'm disabled too. Disabled from being able to buy a f**ing house for a reasonable price. :huh: at least until the spontaneous remission of a hpc heals me :D

You me both. Irritating ain't it. But the boot is slowly moving on to the other foot and when it finally gets there, I'm going to enjoy driving a hard hard bargin.

Revenge is a meal best taken COLD! :)

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Roger you fool, you speak of bad building design and bad TENANT behavior as if it's the landlords fault! That's it, regulate the ******* landlord who should have been round in 5 to turn off that tenants tap for them!

Better building regulations, adhered to by all citizens, would address this problem much better than your suggestion. Landlords are an easy target for govt to pick on. What in effect is happening, is tenants are getting better & better protection from accidents in their homes, whilst the average citizen is free to do almost whatever they like in their own homes, creating dangers for themselves and their neighbours. If a landlord buys their property, they take over many of these problems without realising it & idiots in govt think they should be punished for that.

As a minimum requirement to sort out the problem that you described (that has little to do with the landlord), the building regs should stipulate wet rooms in all bathroom replacements in the future. What is a wet room I hear you ask? It's a room that has a drain in the floor, to drain away any floods & therefore contain the damage caused by carelessness of the TENANT.

Insurance companies could also help in this by refusing to insure badly designed bathrooms.

Angers creeping in.

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Angers creeping in.

Yeah I do get angry when TENANT behaviour is perceived to be anything to do with Landlords.

Remember kiddies, the more landlords are regulated, the more you'll pay for the privelage of having a landlord.

And guess what else? Higher rents = higher house prices. If you had a brain cell between you, you'd know that already.

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Yeah I do get angry when TENANT behaviour is perceived to be anything to do with Landlords.

Remember kiddies, the more landlords are regulated, the more you'll pay for the privelage of having a landlord.

And guess what else? Higher rents = higher house prices. If you had a brain cell between you, you'd know that already.

Actually, before rents can go up there will have to be a serious reduction in competition first. Because there will always be someone out there to under cut you in the current market.

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Yeah I do get angry when TENANT behaviour is perceived to be anything to do with Landlords.

Remember kiddies, the more landlords are regulated, the more you'll pay for the privelage of having a landlord.

And guess what else? Higher rents = higher house prices. If you had a brain cell between you, you'd know that already.

In theory this may be right. But in practice you have affordability issues to contend with. With a faltering economy, glut of properties and job losses who will pay the rents?

Henry Ford I once demonstrated his brand new assembly line method to a gathering of reporters. Henry boasted that he could manufacture cars with a fraction of the number of workers required by conventional methods. One of the reporters piped up and asked Henry "but who will buy your cars then?"

Edited by Realistbear

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Remember kiddies, the more landlords are regulated, the more you'll pay for the privelage of having a landlord.

The more landlords are regulated, the less amateur BTLs will be infesting the housing market and the lower house prices will be.

Because there will always be someone out there to under cut you in the current market.

Indeed. My landlord paid off the cost of my place years ago: he could easily halve the rent and still make a profit... a couple of hundred a month would be better than zero. BTLs who loaded up at the top of the market have no such flexibility.

Of course he'd be a lot better off to have sold the place a year ago and stuck the money in a deposit account.

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Actually, before rents can go up there will have to be a serious reduction in competition first. Because there will always be someone out there to under cut you in the current market.

Not according to market myths. For example as we read here yesterday, in 6 weeks from now all the dodgy landlords in Glasgow will be unable to rent their places.

Overnight the tenants will be on the street, bags in hand. The landlords will be out of business & the properties empty.......

The distortion will be taken up with higher rents for the remaining 'legal' places. Naturally only housing associations will be legal and the council will be exempt from having to be good landlords.

Blah, blah, blah, you know what I mean.

But in reality, how do they reconcile tenants rights to stay at a property, with landlords obligations to step up for registration with the chance of being told they're no longer allowed to be a landlord? The govt says properties in that case can be taken over by the council. How will LENDERS react to that?

Lenders really are the market, they're the ones who've put their chips on the table, if they remove them, massive rent rises, house price crash, govt voted out......

Is this always how Labour govts lose power in the UK? Through over-regulation?

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Is this always how Labour govts lose power in the UK? Through over-regulation?

Good point. I think there is a lot in that. Although it always seems to take the actual result of the over-regulation to happen before people wake up, rather than people seeing it coming, and saying "no thanks - we're not having that".

So what is going to happen with all this regulation of rental properties. To me who knows little about it, it sounds like a very big deal. Is it?

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Guest Guy_Montag

i agree it's about time landlords were regulated,we have had our bathroom ceiling replaced twice and are about to have our kitchen ceiling replaced (through the insurance-thankfully),due to students renting the flat above.the worse time was when one came home drunk at 3am and decided to run a bath then fell asleep!i've often desired a kebab when drunk but never a bath !

the cowboy landlord has changed his phone number for 3rd time as he's sick of us phoning to complain,so now we have no contact number for emergencies.

now landlords will have to register with the city council (they couldn't run a p1sh up in a brewery but it's a start).

http://www.eveningtimes.co.uk/hi/news/5048728.html

I was on the other end of this, when I was a student living in a shithole flat (in Glasgow), we had a shower that leaked all over the floor every time anyone used it. The carpet in the bathroom would squelch as we walked across it. Eventually the water would permeate the capret, floorboards & downstair's roof.

We asked repeatidly for the letting agent to deal with this, over the course of the first two months, between us we made dozens of calls & letters to the agents. It was only when the people downstairs threatened the agent with legal action, anything was done, & that was the most pathetic temporary measure.

That place could have been lovely, but the agent had let it fall to bits. The following year, I heard that the cooker & most of the gas fires had been condemmed by the council health & safety officer.

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You me both. Irritating ain't it. But the boot is slowly moving on to the other foot and when it finally gets there, I'm going to enjoy driving a hard hard bargin.

Revenge is a meal best taken COLD! :)

Sorry to be a pedant but its best "served" cold. For best effect say it in a Mr Burns style voice as you continue to impart wisdom to Smithers :P

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Remember kiddies, the more landlords are regulated, the more you'll pay for the privelage of having a landlord.

Don't you mean "the more it would cost if one wanted a landlord, which may mean that landlords go out of business"? You can't just say that because of government regulation of a business which results in increased costs that the result will be the consumer simply has to tolerate the increase in cost. That might not happen. Instead the consumer may simply stop consuming that particular thing. You might as well say that because the government regulates business so much, foreign countries will simply have to pay more for our goods and services. Errrmmmmm.... No. What happens usually is that they don't buy them any more at the inflated price, and either margins have to fall, or businesses have to say bye bye.

And guess what else? Higher rents = higher house prices. If you had a brain cell between you, you'd know that already.

How can you say that? It doesn't follow logically at all. It might be true, but it is in no way guaranteed. How about this as a counter argument:

Properties that are no longer able to be rented out suddenly become a millstone, unable to generate income. They have to be sold, in a forced or at least pressured sale. A lot of properties appear on the market because of this. House prices drop dramatically as a result. A lot of the former renters take the opportunity to "get on the boat" (I know you'll like that analogy!) The number of people requiring properties to rent falls, to roughly match the fall in the number of properties available to rent. Thus rents have to stay roughly where they are.

Surely that's another possibility? (And in my opinion a more likely one). My point is, what's important is the way the numbers balance out. Just by describing a possible mechanism, you don't prove that it will happen, you just outline one of the possibilities. If you want to convince us of your preferred scenario, you need to supply more reasons why the other possibilities are wrong.

(By the way I don't rent, so I'm not emotionally involved in this particular argument).

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Good point. I think there is a lot in that. Although it always seems to take the actual result of the over-regulation to happen before people wake up, rather than people seeing it coming, and saying "no thanks - we're not having that".

So what is going to happen with all this regulation of rental properties. To me who knows little about it, it sounds like a very big deal. Is it?

I personally think it's massive. But in reality it depends on how strictly the local authorities use their new powers.

If they do enough to cause lenders to pull back from the market (which was the case until 1997), then you'll get your house price crash.

TTRTR not in his usually light hearted, good mood today. Is it because of something he's seen on the news? :D

:lol::lol::lol::lol:

Did you mean at noon?

:lol::lol::lol:

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Remember kiddies, the more landlords are regulated, the more you'll pay for the privelage of having a landlord.

And guess what else? Higher rents = higher house prices. If you had a brain cell between you, you'd know that already.

What a joke, the time has come to dump BTL's, most mickey mouse landlords who see this as easy money are going to be off loading,....oh look how many new "no chain" new instructions have just come onto the market in the last few weeks...

I can't believe this country is full of suckers, who fuel you VI's. Its madness, absolute madness...

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TTRTR not in his usually light hearted, good mood today. Is it because of something he's seen on the news? :D

Could be, he's not been looking too well lately eh?

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Don't you mean "the more it would cost if one wanted a landlord, which may mean that landlords go out of business"? You can't just say that because of government regulation of a business which results in increased costs that the result will be the consumer simply has to tolerate the increase in cost. That might not happen. Instead the consumer may simply stop consuming that particular thing. You might as well say that because the government regulates business so much, foreign countries will simply have to pay more for our goods and services. Errrmmmmm.... No. What happens usually is that they don't buy them any more at the inflated price, and either margins have to fall, or businesses have to say bye bye.

How can you say that? It doesn't follow logically at all. It might be true, but it is in no way guaranteed. How about this as a counter argument:

Properties that are no longer able to be rented out suddenly become a millstone, unable to generate income. They have to be sold, in a forced or at least pressured sale. A lot of properties appear on the market because of this. House prices drop dramatically as a result. A lot of the former renters take the opportunity to "get on the boat" (I know you'll like that analogy!) The number of people requiring properties to rent falls, to roughly match the fall in the number of properties available to rent. Thus rents have to stay roughly where they are.

Surely that's another possibility? (And in my opinion a more likely one). My point is, what's important is the way the numbers balance out. Just by describing a possible mechanism, you don't prove that it will happen, you just outline one of the possibilities. If you want to convince us of your preferred scenario, you need to supply more reasons why the other possibilities are wrong.

(By the way I don't rent, so I'm not emotionally involved in this particular argument).

1/ So now you're saying tenants will stop renting? :lol::lol:

2/ Properties no longer able to be rented out will require either demolition & replacement, or major refurbishment. These cost money, they remove a cheaper alternative from the market and replace it with a more expensive choice. The fact is, that it won't be returned to the market unless the rent justifies the cost of upgrading or replacing it.

And to clarify for you, the higher rent = higher house prices is a fact of life in a reasonably open market. A higher income stream justifies a higher valuation.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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