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Depends if you kids can make friends with people who will one day be powerful people or fund managers etc. 

a bit of cheeky insider trading from tips from mates is common, worth far more than a £200k house

but equally the kid could be bullied make no friends/connections. Or just hate that life, feel like he wants to rebel alongside his Uber-wealthy and become a hippy, although find his friends eventually get bored and just go back to poshington on their big trust funds while your kid is left a hippy in a bed-sit. 
 

Mostly it’s nature and not nurture anyway, having a house might mean they feel they can take bigger risks in career and make a better future. 

depends how would you do if you became 18 and either had a private education or a house? 

 

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The final 10 years of your child’s education in UK private (public) school OR a £200k property in their name.

Based on private school 20k pa.

Neither. £200k in Bitcoin held in a Trust fund. Generational wealth. The extended family Grandkids, Great grandkids, great great grandkids could be supported for 200-300 years at reasonable income levels, even index linked. 

 

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Depends if you are sexist or not. 

I can imagine both sexes would get the most of out it one way or another going to posh schools meeting a rich partner.

but in reality what’s the bloody point? Life is on easy mode once you have a house anyway. not a lot of point getting a fancy education if you don’t need to get a decent job, as your not going to be stuck with a mortgage for 25 years

are you sure it’s actually more about you? I.e you can tell people your kids are in private school? You can hope they become social climbers? 
 

unless your stinking rich, it’s almost impossible to enter that world anyway.
 

I would imagine it’s hell on parents evening to have other kids parents arrive by helicopter, go on multi-thousand pound holidays, and they don’t even have a house, it’s a bit like dangling the carrot of the life they could of have and then they have to go the office with the rest of the wage slaves 

sounds like setting kids up for failure and depression. 

I think buy them a house, then whatever else happens they have a house. better than mental issues! 

Edited by jiltedjen
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Neither. £200k in Bitcoin held in a Trust fund. Generational wealth. The extended family Grandkids, Great grandkids, great great grandkids could be supported for 200-300 years at reasonable income levels, even index linked. 

 

How much does a trust fund cost to administer annually? 

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Depends if you are sexist or not. 

I can imagine both sexes would get the most of out it one way or another going to posh schools meeting a rich partner.

but in reality what’s the bloody point? Life is on easy mode once you have a house anyway. not a lot of point getting a fancy education if you don’t need to get a decent job, as your not going to be stuck with a mortgage for 25 years

are you sure it’s actually more about you? I.e you can tell people your kids are in private school? You can hope they become social climbers? 
 

unless your stinking rich, it’s almost impossible to enter that world anyway.
 

I would imagine it’s hell on parents evening to have other kids parents arrive by helicopter, go on multi-thousand pound holidays, and they don’t even have a house, it’s a bit like dangling the carrot of the life they could of have and then they have to go the office with the rest of the wage slaves 

sounds like setting kids up for failure and depression. 

I think buy them a house, then whatever else happens they have a house. better than mental issues! 

I have read a listened to people from working class families that have done ok, maybe earning 160k per year, who hit the reality above.  They think they have made it and send the kids to a top school.  I’ve posted the maths on this before.  Private school fees 25k, two sets of flash car payments, 12k per year, flash house mortgage, 24k, ski holiday and flash summer holiday, another 12k.  This gives them about 27k for food, heat, light,  Christmas,  birthdays, insurance, petrol, nights out and the odd take away.   So for me and you they are doing well.  But they are sending little Robin or Pippa to a school where the parents are arriving to pick up kids in a brand new DB11, costing about 174k.  So they either look at it and say well done and great and think they can be happy their kids are mixing with the top of the top people.  But what I hear is for some it’s a bitter victory and they are pissed off because they don’t have 100million.  

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Also really rich kids know they are loaded and don’t give a shit about lessons, it’s more about connections. (Spent some time visiting a private school) 

how do you motivate someone to learn when they know they don’t have to.

 

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I'd have to say most of the richest people I've known through work / university / sport have been pretty decent.  Especially those who've been to Eton and other very top schools.  Generally hard working, good manners, good values, not in the least bit snobbish.  Actually the last people I could imagine getting very expensive cars.

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Harry Enfield's character Loadsamoney faced this dilemma and chose to send his son to Eton:

---------------------------------------------------------------------------- 

Hello, do you lot remember my dad from back in the nineteen eighties? He always had a big wad of cash on him – loadsamoney! I don’t see that much of him nowadays – I think he’s in a nursing home somewhere in Eastbourne.

He made so much money back then that he sent me away to Eton. Honest, he did. He didn’t want me to grow up to be a plasterer like him. So now I work in the City of London for a big international bank. No plasterer’s overalls for me, I wear red braces and a bloke in Jermyn Street makes ‘bespoke’ elevator shoes just for me. Fit me a treat they do. Everybody says how much I’ve come up in the world.

I don’t really know what I do all day at the bank, but there’s lots of big numbers on computer screens and every evening we all get pissed on Champagne before we go home. But if I was forced to say what we make there, then I’d have to say “Debt! Loads and loads of debt!

Now the reason I’m much better off than even my dad ever was is ‘cos I’ve got loadsadebt!

[waves a handful of credit cards at the audience]

Look at all my credit cards. Look at them! I owe tens of thousands on each one – loadsadebt! I buy everything with them. I don’t have any money on me – just like the Queen. If you said to me, “Oi, mate, lend us a tenner” then I’d have to say to you “No, sorry mate, I haven’t got any money.”

Just loadsadebt! Nerrrrrrr …. [sneering expression, waving credit cards at audience again]

I drive a Porsche and a Ferrari … and a Bentley. [confused expression] ... not all at the same time of course. [smiles and chuckles]

Lovely motors, top of the range. I got them brand new from a dealer in Mayfair, with car loans. He arranged everything for me. I insured them using me credit card. Loadsadebt!

I live in a penthouse in Chelsea. I’ve got a huge, huge mortgage. [smirks lasciviously]  Loadsadebt!

Over in Fulham I’ve got four other flats that I rent out – all with huge, huge mortgages. I think they’re called ‘bite-a-lot’ mortgages. I don’t know why. Bloke at the estate agents with loads of gel in his hair fixed me up with them. Loadsadebt!

It’s been nice chatting to you, but I’ve got to go now. I’ve got a date with a bra and knickers model.  Stay happy, and always remember that debt is wealth, so borrow all you can and maybe one day you’ll be just as rich as me.

Loadsadebt!       [walks off stage]

Edited by The Spaniard
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I'd have to say most of the richest people I've known through work / university / sport have been pretty decent.  Especially those who've been to Eton and other very top schools.  Generally hard working, good manners, good values, not in the least bit snobbish.  Actually the last people I could imagine getting very expensive cars.

 

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The final 10 years of your child’s education in UK private (public) school OR a £200k property in their name.

Based on private school 20k pa.

It's no good gifting them a 200k house only for them to interpret that as a sign that they don't have to work now, and just sit in all day playing video games until they die somewhere in their 40s of poor health or drug addiction.  Look what happens to the offspring of rich folks who give their children a big trust fund - they usually just go off the rails.  Whether it makes more money or not, investing in their education is likely to be better for their mental health than a windfall bonanza investment.

Or looked at another way: what did private school give me (yes I did go to one!)?  I would say it:
- Allowed me to make the most of my academic and intellectual talents
- Taught me that success is to be praised and not embarrassed about
- Instilled me with confidence and self-belief

So when I rocked up to job interviews I managed to land a good job out of university, where both the good exam results and confidence helped. I've certainly made more than 200k out of that job over the years.

However, would I have got the job anyway...?  We'll never know.  And that's the real issue with this question - the house is a house: nothing more, nothing less.  The education develops the child - but what they do with it will be a mixture of the skill of the school, the talent and application of the child, and of course - luck.  I didn't graduate in the middle of a recession or pandemic, for example.

 

 

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Or to put it bluntly and more arrogantly:  private school helps you (a) be actually better at stuff, and (b) learn how to sound like you're better even when you aren't.

Both of these unlock doors in later life.  Neither actually REQUIRES a private school to learn though, it just helps.

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How much does a trust fund cost to administer annually? 

No idea. Trustees need to appointed, and i assume paid.  Go talk with a solicitor that sets up family Trusts. This is Big boy stuff. what the very very rich do, Rothschilds etc. Thinking about it, Crypto Trusts may already exist, but I have never thought yet to look into it. 

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I have read a listened to people from working class families that have done ok, maybe earning 160k per year, who hit the reality above.  They think they have made it and send the kids to a top school.  I’ve posted the maths on this before.  Private school fees 25k, two sets of flash car payments, 12k per year, flash house mortgage, 24k, ski holiday and flash summer holiday, another 12k.  This gives them about 27k for food, heat, light,  Christmas,  birthdays, insurance, petrol, nights out and the odd take away.   So for me and you they are doing well.  But they are sending little Robin or Pippa to a school where the parents are arriving to pick up kids in a brand new DB11, costing about 174k.  So they either look at it and say well done and great and think they can be happy their kids are mixing with the top of the top people.  But what I hear is for some it’s a bitter victory and they are pissed off because they don’t have 100million.  

Our eldest kid did private primary from age 2 to 11 , paid by Grandad. cost him £ six figures, the child still just couldn't pass the 11+. sibling came along, so needed their turn in private primary, so no money for eldest to go to private 2ndary school, and no 11+ pass so no grammar school.  Moved and took on big mortgage to get in catchment of only "independent" secondary modern school rated "excellent" in 30 miles radius of really shit comprehensives (bar 1 that is a excellent rated serving villages). 

Younger kid has turned out on the autism spectrum and lasted just reception year in an same sex school , in a class of just 11 that cost £4k a term.  We pulled him, won a court case for £4k unpaid fees (i full terms notice ahead cancellation rule we broke) due to their attitude to "difficult" children. Youngest is now in local village primary school a few years and much happier. 

I totted up all the bills, cost Grandad £120k for 9 years of private primary, and that is excluding the 2 ski trips kid took under the age of 10.  Amazing school and contacts we still have there tell stories of how all kids had full remote "Team" lessons with usual teachers during covid Q1/Q2 lockdown, didn't miss any education. 

It was always obvious there where a few of us parents who where "the poorest families" in the school, although we were not the absolute poorest. 

However, eldest absolutely "sailed" the first 2 years of secondary school ( had already done the work aged 9 and 10 in private primary) so Teachers loved the kid.  All current school friends call kid a "posh twit" as a joke and amaze how big our house is and huge garden when they visit. So kid is happy as a bigger fish in a smaller pond. and kid is maintaining friendships with a handful of posh mates from primary school who have all gone onto fee paying private secondary schools. So kid is maintaining higher up social contacts through technology and a lot of "ferrying", meeting 1.2 way of parents over 25 mile distances, which all parents seem happy to do for 6-8 times a year.

  

 

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well i know you mean school education but i think higher education is going online forever. the education bubble is in serious trouble. its been a massive income generator since tony blair. but its over, ciykd see it the last few years. a lot of people are starting to realise its a bit of a scam. not only that the univesities themselves have started competing with the towns they are in for the student value added pound so are contributing less and less in a town than they used to. like a closed loop shipping them into a compound and shipping them back out again. they used to just educate them, then they started putting the book buying and supply shops inhouse, then the bars inhousem then the accomadation in house. closing off more and more revenues for other buisnesses in university towns. 

 

but covid has opebed up a whole new world. lectures from your parents home over zoon and a lecture and exam every once in a while. you will now pay a fortune in fees if you want a social life add on. but in general online degrees with the odd city break to a class room while you stay in a travelodge for a week is the future. the university bubble is well and truly burst. full time uni will only be for specialist schools which will be sold as a full package. in subjects where it cannot be done otherwise of which there are very few, ie medical or law where you need real life scenarios. thus the cost will be vastly reduced and lots of competition and diffrent add ons available like 1 to 1 tution bought online and done through zoom. 

 

 

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I can’t see natural talent mentioned. 

I know 2 children (sibs) who went private and got nothing from it. They simply didn’t have the brains. Huge waste of money and both work in village shops now. A 200k flat would at least mean independence (they live at home still).

As for rich people feeling not rich enough - sure, there is competition, but life is not equal and coming to terms with that is part of learning. 

I have the smallest house in our street. 👎 But it’s not a flat. 👍 

Learning to be happy with what you have is valuable itself. 

Children not caring how much education costs...I have heard teens (a group of 5 on the bus) discussing the per lesson cost of their private school and grumbling they aren’t getting good value when the lesson time is cut short. They seemed hyper aware of the money being spent, and keen to maximise value. 

Horses for courses. 

Still not sure which is a better investment. 

 

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A woman’s best route to the top 1 percent is to marry rich, research shows

I think you will find it works the other way around aswell, men marrying wealthy, smart women.....

Regards question, don't need to go to an expensive private school, just join/attend the right clubs, travel to the right place, or mix around the the right places, make a variety of friends, real or remotely.......get involved.;)

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Personally I would put the money towards getting a house in the catchment area for the best state school, your kids would meet some fairly well off people (for the area), but probably not in the supercar league.  Chances are most parents are determined for their kids to do well academically, so your kids will be swept up with that.  There could also be some stigma attached to private school when applying to university.

 

When the whole thing is over, you can sell the overvalued house to a set of parents also desperate to get into that school.  Then the crazy cycle goes on.

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As someone else stated joining the right clubs for the connections might be an idea. Must admit I don't know what clubs to suggest, I would say the middle class/upper middle class is in flux.  For example, I know golf club memberships are tanking.

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