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Builders running short of everything from power tools & screws to timber & roof tiles as gridlock at UK ports holds up crucial deliveries in Brexit run-up


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"Builders are running short of everything from power tools and screws to timber and roof tiles as the gridlock at UK ports holds up crucial deliveries and sets off alarm bells in the run-up to Brexit. "

https://www.theguardian.com/business/2020/dec/07/builders-run-short-of-supplies-as-uk-port-holdups-raise-brexit-concerns

 

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Its the lumber that worries me most, we burn lots of US wood chip pellets for our power generation having converted the coal power stations such as Drax. A low pressure system sat over the north sea to stop our wind generation and lack of timber to burn is something I think is a real consideration, although other poster have already reassured me this is tosh on the power cut thread I am still not 100% reassured.

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Its the lumber that worries me most, we burn lots of US wood chip pellets for our power generation having converted the coal power stations such as Drax. A low pressure system sat over the north sea to stop our wind generation and lack of timber to burn is something I think is a real consideration, although other poster have already reassured me this is tosh on the power cut thread I am still not 100% reassured.

They come in to other ports - the volumes are enormous the problem is with the classic container ports like Felixstowe which are deep water as well

https://www.bioenergy-news.com/news/largest-wood-pellet-shipment-ever-at-hull-port-drax-delivery/

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These people have had 4 years and 6 months to plan and sort this out. It's almost like the vote in 2016 didn't happen and was only, ahem, confirmed in 2019.

Four years. Six months.

These people play a huge role in running a smooth supply infrastructure. I wouldn't trust them to run a bath, but I'm sure they are handsomely remunerated for their less than sterling efforts.

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As I posted last week the guy on Newsnight was saying that the EU lorry drivers (99% of UK freight is taken to the EU in EU lorries) were refusing to come to the UK in January. So if the container ships are also refusing to come it looks like there will be much to celebrate at the Festival of Brexit and I now  fully understand why Boris is reinventing himself in the new year as a one nation cuddly animal loving Tory,  that should go down really well during the riots on the street due to empty shelves in shops! 

So what is going to happen at the borders on the 1st Jan regardless of a 'deal' ?

May 2020: 

In a letter to the parliamentary committee responsible for the UK’s future relationship with the EU, to which Mr Gove gave evidence on April 27, Mr Keen raised “ongoing concerns” over “potentially misleading and ambiguous comments” from politicians and government.

Mr Keen said that BIFA had managed to put just 1,298 people through its online customs declaration training in 2019. A further 244 online courses were completed by February this year, but in March and April there were only 96 enrolments, a drop attributed to the coronavirus crisis.

Industry insiders said that many of those who had taken up training were already working in customs and were taking advantage of grants to enhance existing skills, rather than bringing new capacity to the industry.

Separately, 870 courses have been completed at an online customs academy set up by the government in September last year with the Institute of Export and International Trade.

The National Audit Office has estimated that 145,000 UK businesses could need to complete customs formalities for the first time from next January, leading to an additional 200m customs declarations a year.

In his letter, Mr Keen warned MPs that it took “at least a year” to train a customs agent to handle “routine inquiries” given the complexity of the forms. But with just six months to go until the new customs regime comes into force, concerns are now growing across the haulage industry about the levels of preparedness. 

Richard Burnett, chief executive of the Road Haulage Association, said he believed it was now “impossible” to train the number of people required in time. “It is impossible to think we can train this number of people, get them ready and processes in place to be ready on the first of January,” he said.

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As I posted last week the guy on Newsnight was saying that the EU lorry drivers (99% of UK freight is taken to the EU in EU lorries) were refusing to come to the UK in January. So if the container ships are also refusing to come it looks like there will be much to celebrate at the Festival of Brexit and I now  fully understand why Boris is reinventing himself in the new year as a one nation cuddly animal loving Tory,  that should go down really well during the riots on the street due to empty shelves in shops! 

So what is going to happen at the borders on the 1st Jan regardless of a 'deal' ?

A big part of the UK problem is a new IT system at Felixstowe that has been causing huge problems since rolled out in 2019. And they have been trying to keep quiet about...

Globally the shipping lines allowed empty containers to pile up in certain countries (UK near the top of the list) through the spring and summer as there were fewer sailings.

There is a huge shortage of containers in the far east so long delays for certain goods awaiting a container (to US and Europe).

Many ships full booked both ways so no space for the empties going back.

The fuller a port is the slower the unloading and reloading so with Felixstowe virtually full and shipping queueing a huge cost in extra days.

The Felixstowe problems have been going on so long that Southampton and London Gateway (e.g. Shell Haven) are effectively at capacity as those that could diverted elsewhere.

I've been hearing of 8-10week delays of imports from the far east.

 

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In his letter, Mr Keen warned MPs that it took “at least a year” to train a customs agent to handle “routine inquiries” given the complexity of the forms. But with just six months to go until the new customs regime comes into force, concerns are now growing across the haulage industry about the levels of preparedness. 

Richard Burnett, chief executive of the Road Haulage Association, said he believed it was now “impossible” to train the number of people required in time. “It is impossible to think we can train this number of people, get them ready and processes in place to be ready on the first of January,” he said.

Shame they only had 4 years and 6 months notice. At least we now know the particular chief executive we need to blame if anything goes wrong in January.

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As I posted last week the guy on Newsnight was saying that the EU lorry drivers (99% of UK freight is taken to the EU in EU lorries) were refusing to come to the UK in January. So if the container ships are also refusing to come it looks like there will be much to celebrate at the Festival of Brexit and I now  fully understand why Boris is reinventing himself in the new year as a one nation cuddly animal loving Tory,  that should go down really well during the riots on the street due to empty shelves in shops! 

So what is going to happen at the borders on the 1st Jan regardless of a 'deal' ?

May 2020: 

In a letter to the parliamentary committee responsible for the UK’s future relationship with the EU, to which Mr Gove gave evidence on April 27, Mr Keen raised “ongoing concerns” over “potentially misleading and ambiguous comments” from politicians and government.

Mr Keen said that BIFA had managed to put just 1,298 people through its online customs declaration training in 2019. A further 244 online courses were completed by February this year, but in March and April there were only 96 enrolments, a drop attributed to the coronavirus crisis.

Industry insiders said that many of those who had taken up training were already working in customs and were taking advantage of grants to enhance existing skills, rather than bringing new capacity to the industry.

Separately, 870 courses have been completed at an online customs academy set up by the government in September last year with the Institute of Export and International Trade.

The National Audit Office has estimated that 145,000 UK businesses could need to complete customs formalities for the first time from next January, leading to an additional 200m customs declarations a year.

In his letter, Mr Keen warned MPs that it took “at least a year” to train a customs agent to handle “routine inquiries” given the complexity of the forms. But with just six months to go until the new customs regime comes into force, concerns are now growing across the haulage industry about the levels of preparedness. 

Richard Burnett, chief executive of the Road Haulage Association, said he believed it was now “impossible” to train the number of people required in time. “It is impossible to think we can train this number of people, get them ready and processes in place to be ready on the first of January,” he said.

Do you have a prediction of when and for how long and how severe the riots will be; A riot forecast if you will; what would you say to others about whether that would be the time to crack other folks heads open and feast on the goo inside; should they?

 

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What will the Guardian journalists find to write about after spring when they can no longer hack out articles which are basically the same rehashed and recycled versions of project fear we've seen so many times over the last 4 years?

I don't suppose the author has gone around asking many builders if they can't work now because they haven't got any wood screws, or if they are worried next year about running out of nails.

Edited by Tiger131
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What will the Guardian journalists find to write about after spring when they can no longer hack out articles which are basically the same rehashed and recycled versions of project fear we've seen so many times over the last 4 years?

The Guardian was pretty critical of the EU before 2016. I remember back in my student days them bleating on endlessly about how the CAP keeps Africa poor. A more recent example was the EU's right to forget which they didn't like one bit https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2014/jul/02/eu-right-to-be-forgotten-guardian-google

However after 2016 they went full EU love in and now cannot abide a bad word said about the bloc. I guess from next year they could pick up the rejoin cause and big up any future EU achievements whilst skimming over issues that may arise.  

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