Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

The incoming farm price crash and the solution to everything


Recommended Posts

Hyperbole?

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/jan/08/lab-grown-food-destroy-farming-save-planet

"We are on the cusp of the biggest economic transformation, of any kind, for 200 years. While arguments rage about plant- versus meat-based diets, new technologies will soon make them irrelevant. Before long, most of our food will come neither from animals nor plants, but from unicellular life. After 12,000 years of feeding humankind, all farming except fruit and veg production is likely to be replaced by ferming: brewing microbes through precision fermentation.

(...)

Several impending disasters are converging on our food supply, any of which could be catastrophic. Climate breakdown threatens to cause what scientists call “multiple breadbasket failures”, through synchronous heatwaves and other impacts. The UN forecasts that by 2050 feeding the world will require a 20% expansion in agriculture’s global water use. But water use is already maxed out in many places: aquifers are vanishing, rivers are failing to reach the sea. The glaciers that supply half the population of Asia are rapidly retreating. Inevitable global heating – due to greenhouse gases already released – is likely to reduce dry season rainfall in critical areas, turning fertile plains into dustbowls. 

A global soil crisis threatens the very basis of our subsistence, as great tracts of arable land lose their fertility through erosion, compaction and contamination. Phosphate supplies, crucial for agriculture, are dwindling fast. Insectageddon threatens catastrophic pollination failures. It is hard to see how farming can feed us all even until 2050, let alone to the end of the century and beyond.

(...)

Research by the thinktank RethinkX suggests that proteins from precision fermentation will be around 10 times cheaper than animal protein by 2035. The result, it says, will be the near-complete collapse of the livestock industry. (...) Only a few components, such as the milk proteins casein and whey, need to be produced through fermentation for profit margins across an entire sector to collapse. Dairy farming in the United States, it claims, will be “all but bankrupt by 2030”. It believes that the American beef industry’s revenues will fall by 90% by 2035."

Much more at the link.

Edited by Timm
Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Timm changed the title to The incoming farm price crash and the solution to everything
 

Hyperbole?

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/jan/08/lab-grown-food-destroy-farming-save-planet

"We are on the cusp of the biggest economic transformation, of any kind, for 200 years. While arguments rage about plant- versus meat-based diets, new technologies will soon make them irrelevant. Before long, most of our food will come neither from animals nor plants, but from unicellular life. After 12,000 years of feeding humankind, all farming except fruit and veg production is likely to be replaced by ferming: brewing microbes through precision fermentation.

(...)

Several impending disasters are converging on our food supply, any of which could be catastrophic. Climate breakdown threatens to cause what scientists call “multiple breadbasket failures”, through synchronous heatwaves and other impacts. The UN forecasts that by 2050 feeding the world will require a 20% expansion in agriculture’s global water use. But water use is already maxed out in many places: aquifers are vanishing, rivers are failing to reach the sea. The glaciers that supply half the population of Asia are rapidly retreating. Inevitable global heating – due to greenhouse gases already released – is likely to reduce dry season rainfall in critical areas, turning fertile plains into dustbowls. 

A global soil crisis threatens the very basis of our subsistence, as great tracts of arable land lose their fertility through erosion, compaction and contamination. Phosphate supplies, crucial for agriculture, are dwindling fast. Insectageddon threatens catastrophic pollination failures. It is hard to see how farming can feed us all even until 2050, let alone to the end of the century and beyond.

(...)

Research by the thinktank RethinkX suggests that proteins from precision fermentation will be around 10 times cheaper than animal protein by 2035. The result, it says, will be the near-complete collapse of the livestock industry. (...) Only a few components, such as the milk proteins casein and whey, need to be produced through fermentation for profit margins across an entire sector to collapse. Dairy farming in the United States, it claims, will be “all but bankrupt by 2030”. It believes that the American beef industry’s revenues will fall by 90% by 2035."

Much more at the link.

Will my medium rare steak oooze blood as i cut it with this stuff? If not, i will stick to the good (and then cheaper) real stuff thanks. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Will my medium rare steak oooze blood as i cut it with this stuff? If not, i will stick to the good (and then cheaper) real stuff thanks. 

If you want it to, it will.

That is the difference - this is not fake meat, it is real meat. It's just not grown inside an animal.

I don't many calls, but this is a game world changer.

Edited by Timm
Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Hyperbole?

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2020/jan/08/lab-grown-food-destroy-farming-save-planet

"We are on the cusp of the biggest economic transformation, of any kind, for 200 years. While arguments rage about plant- versus meat-based diets, new technologies will soon make them irrelevant. Before long, most of our food will come neither from animals nor plants, but from unicellular life. After 12,000 years of feeding humankind, all farming except fruit and veg production is likely to be replaced by ferming: brewing microbes through precision fermentation.

(...)

Several impending disasters are converging on our food supply, any of which could be catastrophic. Climate breakdown threatens to cause what scientists call “multiple breadbasket failures”, through synchronous heatwaves and other impacts. The UN forecasts that by 2050 feeding the world will require a 20% expansion in agriculture’s global water use. But water use is already maxed out in many places: aquifers are vanishing, rivers are failing to reach the sea. The glaciers that supply half the population of Asia are rapidly retreating. Inevitable global heating – due to greenhouse gases already released – is likely to reduce dry season rainfall in critical areas, turning fertile plains into dustbowls. 

A global soil crisis threatens the very basis of our subsistence, as great tracts of arable land lose their fertility through erosion, compaction and contamination. Phosphate supplies, crucial for agriculture, are dwindling fast. Insectageddon threatens catastrophic pollination failures. It is hard to see how farming can feed us all even until 2050, let alone to the end of the century and beyond.

(...)

Research by the thinktank RethinkX suggests that proteins from precision fermentation will be around 10 times cheaper than animal protein by 2035. The result, it says, will be the near-complete collapse of the livestock industry. (...) Only a few components, such as the milk proteins casein and whey, need to be produced through fermentation for profit margins across an entire sector to collapse. Dairy farming in the United States, it claims, will be “all but bankrupt by 2030”. It believes that the American beef industry’s revenues will fall by 90% by 2035."

Much more at the link.

This article is from 2006

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I did not spot it i remember the article and wondered if it were possible, 14 years later it has not happened, does not mena it is not going to, perhaps it is not good to be an early investor

 

Perhaps now we have all the empty commercial property they can be turned to Vertical farming

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vertical_farming

 

I knew those councils did not buy those empty shopping centres for nothing !

 

or perhaps thats 'vertical face palming' 😃

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship
Link to post
Share on other sites
 

This article is from 2006

 

 

Well spotted!

 

 

I did not spot it i remember the article and wondered if it were possible, 14 years later it has not happened, does not mena it is not going to, perhaps it is not good to be an early investor

Wake up

its '2006' comments

the articles from this yr Wed 8 Jan 2020 06.00 GMT

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship
Link to post
Share on other sites

Its an interesting concept and will likely form part of our diet in the future.

If indeed this does become cheaper than farm meat then it will instantly take off.

I must admit the first thing that came to my head when I read this was how useful this would be for a colony on Mars or the moon 🤔

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Its an interesting concept and will likely form part of our diet in the future.

If indeed this does become cheaper than farm meat then it will instantly take off.

I must admit the first thing that came to my head when I read this was how useful this would be for a colony on Mars or the moon 🤔

Matt Damon would have been all ears😁

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is will be a good addition to the mix. People who want the cheapest and biggest takeaway box of deep fried white nugget food will be all over this stuff. People who want to pay extra for local reared traceable premium steak will continue to do so.

Its a bit like how the invention of motor cars meant people didn't have to use horses for transport. But people who love using horses still do so, for racing, riding or haulage.

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I did not spot it i remember the article and wondered if it were possible, 14 years later it has not happened, does not mena it is not going to, perhaps it is not good to be an early investor

I recall the first lab grown burgers cost something like $250k each to produce. Quite a bit of process refinement and cost reduction needed before they turn up in Aldi. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

That is the difference - this is not fake meat, it is real meat. It's just not grown inside an animal.

I don't many calls, but this is a game world changer.

I would be very surprised if the meat is similar unless the whole of the animal is replicated in the lab - which would make it look a lot like conventional farming.

With my technologist baseball hat firmly on, I love the idea that meat can be grown without an animal. Very clever - even if I don't want to consider it food.

With my dining napkin on my lap, I am not enthusiastic.  I like conventional food - mankind has developed a taste for it over millenia.

Thinking outside the box, I expect (if lab-gown-meat becomes a "thing") that it will be a world changer.  It will likely devastate the agricultural sector and do untold damage to our environment.

Edited by A.steve
Link to post
Share on other sites
 

(...)

the articles from this yr Wed 8 Jan 2020 06.00 GMT

Thank you - just less than a year old.

Here is something more recent {4 days ago):

This burger takes something between two to three days to grow,” says Tomer Halevy as he chops red onions, iceberg lettuce and avocado. He proceeds to batter what appears to be a strip of raw chicken before dipping it in breadcrumbs.

Halevy uses the word “grow” because chickens do not need to be slaughtered en masse to produce this type of meat. Cells taken from “source” chickens are cultured in a laboratory, creating potentially endless supplies of muscle and fat tissue. Some cells were removed from eggs, meaning the meat is from birds that were never even born.

(...)

The breaded patty is deep-fried in oil, before being placed on a sweet brioche bun, flavoured by wasabi and chilli mayonnaise, with a side of sweet potato chips. Similar to many chicken burgers, it breaks and flakes when pulled apart and is extremely tender. It tastes, at least to this reporter, like a chicken burger.

(...)

Savir says the production cost of his chicken burger is $35, which seems high but is dramatically less than it was a few years ago. In 2013, a Dutch pharmacologist, Mark Post, made history by eating the first lab-grown beef burger. It cost about £225,000.

SuperMeat anticipates cultivated meat will get cheaper as the industry grows, possibly reaching cost parity with farmed meat in six to seven years. "

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.