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Petition calling for evictions after two weeks’ rent arrears hits 10,000 signatures


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https://propertyindustryeye.com/petition-calling-for-evictions-after-two-weeks-rent-arrears-hits-10000-signatures/?fbclid=IwAR1QCFQ8UBeLgb4MeK81l81AqvClAhcVWTOhqHSsKCfe-lwR6eEz3YoFizY

A petition calling for evictions after two weeks’ rent arrears has attracted 10,000 signatures – two months after being launched.

Property investor Ranjan Bhattacharya launched the petition in early October calling on the government to enable landlords to start evictions once a tenant falls more than two weeks behind in their rent.

The government has been under growing pressure to protect tenants from the threat of losing their homes during the coronavirus pandemic, following the end of the temporary ban on landlords evicting tenants, but Bhattacharya wants to see more done to help buy-to-let landlords.

Buy-to-let landlords could be facing up to two years without rent due to the government’s decision to introduce a six-month eviction ban, the National Residential Landlords Association (NRLA) recently calculated.

Tenants across the UK are facing months of rent arrear payments as a consequence of the current pandemic.

 

Bhattacharya said: “There are laws in place to protect shop keepers large and small. Not paying rent is also theft with the landlord being the victim.

“In Australia, tenants can be evicted for being 14 days in arrears with rent. Let’s have that system here [in the UK].”

He added: “The current system is unfair to landlords. If a tenant doesn’t pay rent then it can take a year for Landlord to regain procession. In that time the landlord still has to pay mortgage and other costs. This can ruin many small-scale landlords.

“Furthermore, it incentives landlords to only rent their properties to tenants with higher than average income who are likely to care about getting a bad credit rating.

“Let’s have an Australian style system which aims to be neutral between landlord and tenant.”

 

Ranjan-Bhattacharya.jpg

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Bhattacharya said: “There are laws in place to protect shop keepers large and small. Not paying rent is also theft with the landlord being the victim.

Isn't this the same slumlord boasting about using his numerous shell company accounts to claim multiple £50K Bounceback Loans to soak up moar property?! He's done very well out of Coronavirus so, if i were him, i wouldn't start pleading now. 

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Isn't this the same slumlord boasting about using his numerous shell company accounts to claim multiple £50K Bounceback Loans to soak up moar property?! He's done very well out of Coronavirus so, if i were him, i wouldn't start pleading now. 

Link please.

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https://propertyindustryeye.com/petition-calling-for-evictions-after-two-weeks-rent-arrears-hits-10000-signatures/?fbclid=IwAR1QCFQ8UBeLgb4MeK81l81AqvClAhcVWTOhqHSsKCfe-lwR6eEz3YoFizY

A petition calling for evictions after two weeks’ rent arrears has attracted 10,000 signatures – two months after being launched.

Property investor Ranjan Bhattacharya launched the petition in early October calling on the government to enable landlords to start evictions once a tenant falls more than two weeks behind in their rent.

The government has been under growing pressure to protect tenants from the threat of losing their homes during the coronavirus pandemic, following the end of the temporary ban on landlords evicting tenants, but Bhattacharya wants to see more done to help buy-to-let landlords.

Buy-to-let landlords could be facing up to two years without rent due to the government’s decision to introduce a six-month eviction ban, the National Residential Landlords Association (NRLA) recently calculated.

Tenants across the UK are facing months of rent arrear payments as a consequence of the current pandemic.

 

Bhattacharya said: “There are laws in place to protect shop keepers large and small. Not paying rent is also theft with the landlord being the victim.

“In Australia, tenants can be evicted for being 14 days in arrears with rent. Let’s have that system here [in the UK].”

He added: “The current system is unfair to landlords. If a tenant doesn’t pay rent then it can take a year for Landlord to regain procession. In that time the landlord still has to pay mortgage and other costs. This can ruin many small-scale landlords.

“Furthermore, it incentives landlords to only rent their properties to tenants with higher than average income who are likely to care about getting a bad credit rating.

“Let’s have an Australian style system which aims to be neutral between landlord and tenant.”

 

Ranjan-Bhattacharya.jpg

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Oi Ranjan Saab... No, You can't enter this house or any metaphysical embodiment of heaven you absolute smug sack of leeching lies.

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I recommend only renting from landlords who own their property, they're a lot more relaxed.

Landlords with mortgages are just feckless rent seekers.

This.

Friend recently moved and his landlord is absolutely lovely as they own the home. They even brought him a movin in present and live down the road and are quick with any issues.

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Since when is falling behind on rent theft?

It literally is worse than that. It's tantamount to killing and torturing.

There are genuinely scummy tenants. But the dynamics are completely off-kilter. I suspect most Landlords supporting this have big leverage

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https://propertyindustryeye.com/petition-calling-for-evictions-after-two-weeks-rent-arrears-hits-10000-signatures/?fbclid=IwAR1QCFQ8UBeLgb4MeK81l81AqvClAhcVWTOhqHSsKCfe-lwR6eEz3YoFizY

A petition calling for evictions after two weeks’ rent arrears has attracted 10,000 signatures – two months after being launched.

Property investor Ranjan Bhattacharya launched the petition in early October calling on the government to enable landlords to start evictions once a tenant falls more than two weeks behind in their rent.

The government has been under growing pressure to protect tenants from the threat of losing their homes during the coronavirus pandemic, following the end of the temporary ban on landlords evicting tenants, but Bhattacharya wants to see more done to help buy-to-let landlords.

Buy-to-let landlords could be facing up to two years without rent due to the government’s decision to introduce a six-month eviction ban, the National Residential Landlords Association (NRLA) recently calculated.

Tenants across the UK are facing months of rent arrear payments as a consequence of the current pandemic.

 

Bhattacharya said: “There are laws in place to protect shop keepers large and small. Not paying rent is also theft with the landlord being the victim.

“In Australia, tenants can be evicted for being 14 days in arrears with rent. Let’s have that system here [in the UK].”

He added: “The current system is unfair to landlords. If a tenant doesn’t pay rent then it can take a year for Landlord to regain procession. In that time the landlord still has to pay mortgage and other costs. This can ruin many small-scale landlords.

“Furthermore, it incentives landlords to only rent their properties to tenants with higher than average income who are likely to care about getting a bad credit rating.

“Let’s have an Australian style system which aims to be neutral between landlord and tenant.”

 

Ranjan-Bhattacharya.jpg

Can we have any publicly self-advertised landlords or just general public figures added to a HPC

"Hall of Fame."

Mark, Fergusss et al.

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This.

Friend recently moved and his landlord is absolutely lovely as they own the home. They even brought him a movin in present and live down the road and are quick with any issues.

True, True Landlords should not be leveraged, but own outright with the rent just being effectively a yield on the investment. 

I would only ever go into BTL if it was that, not MTL. 

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Since when is falling behind on rent theft?

A person is guilty of theft if he dishonestly appropriates property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving the other of it; and “thief” and “steal” shall be construed accordingly.

If you occupy a property and have paid less than the full agreed rent, you have deprived the landlord of some of the value of the property for the rental period. If the renter is in no position to pay their rental arrears then they will have permanently deprived the landlord of that value. But it's not clear that someone who falls behind on rent will not be able to pay their rental arrears. Landlords would probably benefit from more information on their tenants who are in rental arrears. If they received reassurance that rent would be paid (e.g. an explanation and plan: couldn't pay rent last month, due to unexpected costs or loss of income, but can feasibly save x per month, so repay by this date), they would probably be less likely to seek an eviction as a knee-jerk response.

 

Bhattacharya said: “The current system is unfair to landlords. If a tenant doesn’t pay rent then it can take a year for Landlord to regain procession.

Why does he think rental arrears are interfering with his procession?

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From my pov the eviction ban has actually done more harm than good for renters because in case anyone hasnt noticed the supply of rental properties has been absolutely decimated, presumably as few landlords are prepared to risk taking new tenents when they could in theory just sit there and pay no rent. This was one of the factors that pushed into having to buy recently rather than move to another rental.

Edited by goldbug9999
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This.

Friend recently moved and his landlord is absolutely lovely as they own the home. They even brought him a movin in present and live down the road and are quick with any issues.

Very rare! My landlords have always been overleveraged *****s. Which makes me glad I'm about to buy a house (even though it's during a bubble on a bubble).

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From my pov the eviction ban has actually done more harm than good for renters because in case anyone hasnt noticed the supply of rental properties has been absolutely decimated, presumably as few landlords are prepared to risk taking new tenents when they could in theory just sit there and pay no rent. This was one of the factors that pushed into having to buy recently rather than move to another rental.

Yes definitely very few rentals near me, another reason we had to buy.

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From my pov the eviction ban has actually done more harm than good for renters because in case anyone hasnt noticed the supply of rental properties has been absolutely decimated, presumably as few landlords are prepared to risk taking new tenents when they could in theory just sit there and pay no rent. This was one of the factors that pushed into having to buy recently rather than move to another rental.

Interesting. I think it did seem a very one sided approach and for non leveraged landlords living off rent could have effectively stopped their only income. And leverage landlords meant taking mortgage holidays etc  

Not the same subject (but the same market effect) is in our town the council will support DSS tenants fully under any circumstances to avoid evictions. To the point that LLs are offered no advice from the council re evictions when they have a disruptive or non paying DSS tenant. Basically eviction means the tenant becomes the councils issue and (in our town) the waiting lists for housing are huge.  However in other towns eg York, the council still ‘favour and protect’ tenants as they should but it is a bit more balanced. 

My point is in our town DSS now cannot get rentals. There is already huge demand from non DSS and the council have effectively alienated themselves and DSS tenants. 

Similar to your point. If you stop evictions to this extent it can impact the supply. 

NB

Not sure the eviction restrictions and impact on rentals would ‘PUSH someone into buying’ in a really frothy and overpriced market. Maybe more like a factor why someone may ‘choose to buy’ in a really frothy and overpriced market. Once this froth disappears I think there will be much much better value than there has been recently but that’s covered in many other threads....

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From my pov the eviction ban has actually done more harm than good for renters because in case anyone hasnt noticed the supply of rental properties has been absolutely decimated, presumably as few landlords are prepared to risk taking new tenents when they could in theory just sit there and pay no rent. This was one of the factors that pushed into having to buy recently rather than move to another rental.

Would they not take a six month rent up front deal? Assuming you have the cash spare. 

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From my pov the eviction ban has actually done more harm than good for renters because in case anyone hasnt noticed the supply of rental properties has been absolutely decimated

 

It must be annoying if you’re looking to move but I see the eviction ban as a massive power transfer to tenants, albeit temporarily. 

In my experience landlords and letting agents throw around the threat of issuing a Section 21 far too liberally.

“Want to move to a periodic tenancy?”, “Don’t want to stay off work to let the valuer in so LL can switch mortgages every 2 years?”,  “Don’t agree with LA assessment of ‘strong demand’ requires 7% rent increase each year?” Disagree and S21 for you and there’s nothing tenants can do about it as revenge eviction clause only covers denied repair requests. 

The longer the ban continues the more unpalatable it will become to reintroduce S21 in its current form. My guess is, as with the fee ban, Scotland and Wales will introduce it first then the pressure will mount on England. It was, after all, a manifesto pledge and they've only 3.5 years left if they want to keep that pledge. 

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Would they not take a six month rent up front deal? Assuming you have the cash spare. 

Very few have that cash spare Marky ... we on HPC(well some of us) are an extreme minority sometimes you need to remember that 

Edited by Warlord
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A person is guilty of theft if he dishonestly appropriates property belonging to another with the intention of permanently depriving the other of it; and “thief” and “steal” shall be construed accordingly.

If you occupy a property and have paid less than the full agreed rent, you have deprived the landlord of some of the value of the property for the rental period. If the renter is in no position to pay their rental arrears then they will have permanently deprived the landlord of that value. But it's not clear that someone who falls behind on rent will not be able to pay their rental arrears. Landlords would probably benefit from more information on their tenants who are in rental arrears. If they received reassurance that rent would be paid (e.g. an explanation and plan: couldn't pay rent last month, due to unexpected costs or loss of income, but can feasibly save x per month, so repay by this date), they would probably be less likely to seek an eviction as a knee-jerk response.

Why does he think rental arrears are interfering with his procession?

The point is, if you have no intention of paying the money back, then yes you are stealing. But it takes a while to establish that, you shouldn't be kicked out of your property for falling behind on rent for a short time. It's completely unreasonable to  threaten to take someone's home away from them in that way, especially in the middle of a public health crisis and at Christmas time.

Edited by spacedin
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