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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/business-55011477

Millions of public sector workers face pay freeze


“It outlined that in the "interest of fairness we must exercise restraint in future public sector pay awards, ensuring that across this year and the spending review period, public sector pay levels retain parity with the private sector".

 

In September the Office for National Statistics calculated that public sector workers on average earned 7% more than private sector workers last year

 

This should be interesting..

 

 

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/business-55011477

Millions of public sector workers face pay freeze


“It outlined that in the "interest of fairness we must exercise restraint in future public sector pay awards, ensuring that across this year and the spending review period, public sector pay levels retain parity with the private sector".

 

In September the Office for National Statistics calculated that public sector workers on average earned 7% more than private sector workers last year

 

This should be interesting..

 

 

Dishonest reporting.  I had a pay freeze for 10 years until recently.  Even with my last pay rise, I would have been down approx. 15% if I hadn't had a few promotions during this time. Though I feel like I earn a decent amount, in real terms my salary is down by 15% percentage too.  The impact is not as obvious to me for the obvious reasons.

I would have liked the parity argument to be applied during the 10 year freeze.

And please don't mention 'gold-plated' pensions but I do agree they're pretty much gold standard - not the newer type. Btw, I contribute about 8.5% which is not to be sniffed at along with 40% tax.  Doesn't get you far in London.

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Won't mention the gold plated pensions then... but we can't really ignore the the typical daily workload of 2-3 hours work to fill an 8 hour ''working'' day can we?

This doesn't even make sense.

There are millions of people employed in the public sector. How would you be able to lump them all into a single group. Who are these supposedly lucky ones who only have a "2-3hour workload"?

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Dishonest reporting.  I had a pay freeze for 10 years until recently.  Even with my last pay rise, I would have been down approx. 15% if I hadn't had a few promotions during this time. Though I feel like I earn a decent amount, in real terms my salary is down by 15% percentage too.  The impact is not as obvious to me for the obvious reasons.

I would have liked the parity argument to be applied during the 10 year freeze.

And please don't mention 'gold-plated' pensions but I do agree they're pretty much gold standard - not the newer type. Btw, I contribute about 8.5% which is not to be sniffed at along with 40% tax.  Doesn't get you far in London.

Whats the effective employers contribution 26%?

No point shouting gold plated pension I agree but also no point denying people in the private sector don't get anything like as generous. Typically 5 or 6% employers leaving the employee to make up the shortfall. 

Given whats happening to the economy I can't see pensions improving for the private sector nor pay. 

https://www.civilservicepensionscheme.org.uk/employers/employer-contribution-rates/

 

At least everyone had the joy of lockdown though?! Yeah?! Good cos it worked so well expect lockdown 3 and maybe even 4

Edited by captainb
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The public sector hasn't seen anything yet.

Taxes coming in over the next couple of years are going to be pitiful.  The small business I run will be contributing 25% less in VAT and probably 90% less in corporation tax.  Plus personally I'll be paying about 50% less in income tax.  But this won't properly hit the national accounts in 'cashflow' terms until 2022.  

Multiply this across the country and it's going to be a bloodbath.

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As Boris likes to say, F*** Business

F*** Nurses

F*** Teachers

F*** Police

F*** Military (if you think the additional spend will go to equip personell and help veterens instead of consultancies, you are deluded)

 

...so long as he has money to throw another prop for HPI

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Can you please list a few examples?

By all means, my sister and her husband for two.

Both worked in completely separate sections of the LA doing completely different roles but both admit that the workload for them and their colleagues is a complete piss take, 3 hours work would be a busy day.

My sister repeatedly pleaded with her bosses for additional roles and responsibilities, just so she could have more work to do to relieve the tedium of her day, she wasn't interested in any extra pay. They were very resistant to giving her extra work for a long time but eventually they relented and did give her a bit extra to do, no sooner had she took on this extra workload than her bosses announced there would be a new admin assistant working under my sister and it was up to my sister to delegate work out to her... it was at this point my sister gave up and handed her notice in.

  

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Public sector retention rates are very high. That tells you everything you need to know about the working conditions. 

 

However if not....I know a few people who work in the public sector. They've been fully paid since March and only had to do 1 day per week despite it being an office job. 

Even when the kids went back in September they are still only churning out 1 day of work between 9 and 3.30pm. Not bad for £40k and fat pension at the end. 

Edited by dragging boot straps
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My sister repeatedly pleaded with her bosses for additional roles and responsibilities, just so she could have more work to do to relieve the tedium of her day, she wasn't interested in any extra pay. They were very resistant to giving her extra work for a long time but eventually they relented and did give her a bit extra to do, no sooner had she took on this extra workload than her bosses announced there would be a new admin assistant working under my sister and it was up to my sister to delegate work out to her... it was at this point my sister gave up and handed her notice in.

  

+100

my partner worked in NHS admin, she was almost in tears with boredom, begging for extra work to do, about 3 hours work in an 8 hour day. 

They got the job and was worried about if they could do it or not (very anxious person), I laughed at the time and said ‘it’s public sector you will probably be bored it’s a big make work scheme’ 

and I was right, it’s pretty shocking the waste, and I can’t even comprehend the level of staff sickness they get. everyone is maxing out their sick day allowance. 

I do worry a bit about other public bodies being an absolute lazy joke, but it’s all a big make-work scheme, so instead of having masses of lazy unemployed you at least get some public services from them. 

of course there are some very hard working individuals who keep the ship together, and some jobs can never be paid enough for what they do as they can be traumatising, some real saints out there, but a lot of the lower levels are just a typical slice of lower class British society, doing as little as they can get away with. 
 

wages are not the whole story, as someone pointed out previous it’s the house price to effort ratio which is pretty crap right now. 

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By all means, my sister and her husband for two.

Both worked in completely separate sections of the LA doing completely different roles but both admit that the workload for them and their colleagues is a complete piss take, 3 hours work would be a busy day.

My sister repeatedly pleaded with her bosses for additional roles and responsibilities, just so she could have more work to do to relieve the tedium of her day, she wasn't interested in any extra pay. They were very resistant to giving her extra work for a long time but eventually they relented and did give her a bit extra to do, no sooner had she took on this extra workload than her bosses announced there would be a new admin assistant working under my sister and it was up to my sister to delegate work out to her... it was at this point my sister gave up and handed her notice in.

  

Oh well. Your anecdote settles it then. 

I mean, I've worked in or eith the public sector on and off for about a decade now and in that time I've seen publuc sector organisations reduce headcount and pile more and more work on existing staff but obviously I must be wrong because you have one anecdote about an as yet unnamed local authority. 

Incidentally the pay cimparison is usually ******** as well as it ignores the fact that menial jobs in the public sector are increasingly done either by council owned subsidiaries or by outsourcing companies and the remaining people are usually better qualified than private sector counterparts (scrutiny on the public sector means less "qualified by experience" staff than in equivalent roles in the private sector). 

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There was a teacher on the BBC news last night ‘It is totally unfair that teachers should receive a pay freeze, we kept the country running.’ Everyone in my house burst out laughing, it is absolutely hilarious how highly they think of themselves.

The people who kept this country running were the power station workers, truck drivers, supermarket workers, farmers, fishermen etc and they all probably got a pay cut if not a bit of redundancy.

Teachers indeed lol I’m still chuckling now to myself.

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I did a contract in the NHS.  What I experienced was over staffing and people sitting about watching television for a good part of the day.  They still complained that they were too busy.  Not a great impression.  Doctors thought I was a doc and were too free with information about how they were playing the system and getting 1k for a locum shift.  

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There was a teacher on the BBC news last night ‘It is totally unfair that teachers should receive a pay freeze, we kept the country running.’ Everyone in my house burst out laughing, it is absolutely hilarious how highly they think of themselves.

The people who kept this country running were the power station workers, truck drivers, supermarket workers, farmers, fishermen etc and they all probably got a pay cut if not a bit of redundancy.

Teachers indeed lol I’m still chuckling now to myself.

Teachers I was in contact with had a 6 month holiday.  No homework sent, they were off working on their run times and cycle times or their alcohol times.  

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I did do a 6 month stint at a local authority in London in 2014 and my experience is somewhat different. There were definitely people there which did not have appropriate skills to do the job but they had Accenture in at that time to try to up skill everyone and make it more efficient - I can say they made the work alone more monotonous and boring, I left and I did promise myself I'd never work for the government again - pay wasn't great either.

I don't recognise that people weren't busy - maybe during the Blair years this was the case but during my time they were looking to make things more efficient and were making redundancies.

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I did a contract in the NHS.  What I experienced was over staffing and people sitting about watching television for a good part of the day.  They still complained that they were too busy.  Not a great impression.  Doctors thought I was a doc and were too free with information about how they were playing the system and getting 1k for a locum shift.  

You're a contractor.  A locum on 1k will be a contractor.  How did your day rate compare to theirs?

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I worked in the public sector for 10 years after graduating university. There were many good people but there were also many trash ones - especially in management, HR, IT and HQ.   

The bad were clearly overpaid; produced little to no value; constant bullying, harassment and discrimination; a lot of time spent on pointless meetings, poor technical skills/capabilities, etc. The good people were constantly overlooked for promotion because management were always in self preservation mode (i.e. didn't want someone who was better than them).  No pay for overtime. Also huge amount of money was wasted because they knew the government would just pay up so why bother trying to save money with innovation. 

The good people then end up leaving and going elsewhere or they say "feck it, I'll take all the shite from others and do the bare minimum to get by". Luckily, I've managed to get out of the public sector and will be starting a new career in the private sector in 2 weeks time.

 

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/business-55011477

Millions of public sector workers face pay freeze


“It outlined that in the "interest of fairness we must exercise restraint in future public sector pay awards, ensuring that across this year and the spending review period, public sector pay levels retain parity with the private sector".

 

In September the Office for National Statistics calculated that public sector workers on average earned 7% more than private sector workers last year

 

This should be interesting..

 

 

Odd as well that NHS staff will be exempt from pay freezes including GPs and consultants on £100-150k a year.

But people who risk their lives on the front line like soldiers, firefighters and police officers on £25k or less per annum will see their pay frozen.

Anyone a bit tired of protecting the NHS at the expense of everything else?

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  • 442 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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