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Chancellor considers plan to CHARGE motorists for every mile they drive on UK roads to fill £40billion tax hole


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Rishi Sunak is considering plans to charge motorists for every mile they drive on Britain's roads to fill a £40billion tax hole left by a push to electric cars, according to reports.

The Chancellor is reportedly 'very interested' in the idea of a national road pricing scheme - which would steer motorists into a new 'pay-as-you-drive' type system. 

A similar type of scheme was dramatically shelved by Labour in 2007 amid uproar that drivers could be charged up to £1.50 a mile.

Road pricing in England is limited to schemes such as the M6 Toll in the Midlands, the Dartford crossing on the M25, London's Congestion Zone and a handful of small tunnels and bridges.

But a national scheme is now being considered amid fears a switch to electric vehicles will leave a massive tax shortfall from the loss of key revenue raisers such as Fuel Duty and Vehicle Excise Duty, according to the Times.
 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8951969/Rishi-Sunak-considers-plan-charge-motorists-mile-drive-Britains-roads.html

 

This guy is pure evil...

 

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I have been saying that for ages on here......only game in town, privatisation of our roads to rent out by the mile using new compulsory electric vehicles.......our whole future economy is being set up to transfer our transport systems, road, rail, cycles...why all the silly 'smart roads'.......what else can we do to create future jobs? Pull in  big streem of constant money supply....in the name of clean and green, will the people buy into it?...........will they travel less? spend less? do less?......the cleanest way to live.;)

 

 

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I live next to a very busy road

in the next 30 years or sooner the pollution and noise will drop dramatically 

I also live in walking distance of my work

for once in my life this is a tax that won’t bother me, that I can avoid.

but to save for the house I had to spend two hours a day commuting from my parents house on very busy roads at peak times (which most likely would be the highest £1.50 a mile rate)

£1.50 a mile is crazy it would of cost me £108 a day, or £540 a week, or even more with occasional saturday work also 

No road charging like that will ever be acceptable. fuel is not that expensive with tax.

perhaps they would do a scheme where only the largest Chelsea tractors have to pay the £1.50 amount per mile, and it’s less for more economical cars 

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£1.50 per mile 😂

most people I know do around 15 miles each way per day - on the roads that get congested so would be ‘expensive’. So that’d be £45 per day and thus about 10k p/a paid out of NET income for the avg full time worker. Plus fuel/maintenance/insurance etc. 

good luck getting employers to pay the 15k-20k extra in gross it’d take to offset this Rishy.

 

 

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I live next to a very busy road

in the next 30 years or sooner the pollution and noise will drop dramatically 

I also live in walking distance of my work

for once in my life this is a tax that won’t bother me, that I can avoid.

but to save for the house I had to spend two hours a day commuting from my parents house on very busy roads at peak times (which most likely would be the highest £1.50 a mile rate)

£1.50 a mile is crazy it would of cost me £108 a day, or £540 a week, or even more with occasional saturday work also 

No road charging like that will ever be acceptable. fuel is not that expensive with tax.

perhaps they would do a scheme where only the largest Chelsea tractors have to pay the £1.50 amount per mile, and it’s less for more economical cars 

Not really... Brake dust is a major issue...

https://phys.org/news/2020-01-air-pollution-effects-immune-cells.html

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This guy is pure evil...

You yourself want a smaller government. This kind of tax is avoidable, so it is much better than say, income tax.

Plus, if £1.50/mile is what it takes in aggregate to build and maintain a road, why should non road users be robbed to subsidize the people who do use the road?

 

If the roads become ringfenced and tax raised by road activities is only used to fund roads then people would finally get to choose whether they want to pay for roads or not. I think that's a good thing.

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You yourself want a smaller government. This kind of tax is avoidable, so it is much better than say, income tax.

Plus, if £1.50/mile is what it takes in aggregate to build and maintain a road, why should non road users be robbed to subsidize the people who do use the road?

 

If the roads become ringfenced and tax raised by road activities is only used to fund roads then people would finally get to choose whether they want to pay for roads or not. I think that's a good thing.

Road users supplement the govt coffers by about £30bn  The amount spent on roads is roughly £10bn...

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Not sure which is the stupidest, the original source citing an "up to" price, or the responses calculating costs based on everything costing that "up to" amount.

It's quite clever framing. Everyone gets het up about the maximum, then breathes a sigh of relief when its 'only' pennies per mile.

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It's fairly inevitable, and in many ways better than fuel duty. Currently tax on petrol/diesel works out at something in the region of 10p/mile, depending on your car and driving style. With electric cars there will be a very small amount of 5%VAT on domestic electricity, but nothing of note revenue wise.

Fuel duty costs you the same whether driving round the Highlands at night or London at rush hour. Road pricing could make the Highlands, West Wales and Northumberland (certainly outwith summer) cheap or even free, but charge £1.50/mile in Central London at rush hour.

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Then the fuel tax should be dramatically slashed back.

ha, ha, ha, poor boy, you are deluded. As a two family electric car, you need ludites the "nudge" to electric. This will be an extra cost for ALL drivers, basically for ICE drivers a "pollution tax" per mile. 

If anything combustion fuel will drop a bit at first as oil supply has nowhere to go, but then will rise in price as demand drops, less refining, volume cost benefits will drop, petrol stations close, are converted to BEV rapid chargers. 

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This could work but not at £1.50 a mile, that’s nuts.

That would only be on very short / congested routes / stretches at peak times. Fish in a barrel.  Overall you new fangled BEV owing, working from home middle class family like us are quids in.  Currently doing bugger all miles, BEV are returning 2.5-4 miles per kwh / winter / summer driving steadily. We charge at night using a special EV tarriff that only charges 5p kwh between 12.30am and 4.30 am. 

So our 5% tax fuel costs are at worst 2p mile, best 1.25p mile.  Even the best diesel is 12p mile for fuel. 

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Not really... Brake dust is a major issue...

https://phys.org/news/2020-01-air-pollution-effects-immune-cells.html

Always got to find the next health scare when it looks like getting worked up about the current one might not be viable any more. Sort that one out and it'll be rinse and repeat.

Road pricing requires tracking. There are no circumstances where that should be regarded as acceptable (it would also require a big government IT system, and we know what their track record is like).

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