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Buying a house - Mining survey


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We're in process of buying a house... The mortgage company asked for a "mining" survey after seeing the "general" land survey. They've now asked for a different mining survey. This I believe is because the house is on the site of an old brickworks (200 years ago). Several of these 1950s houses bought and sold since 2000, I wonder if lenders are trying find a reason not to lend?

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 Is there any way of finding out if this survey may have been done previously, or any close neighbours that have done this already? Is any of this info already in the public domain, like old mining maps?

 I was offered this service when buying in staffordshire, I knew the house and area really well as was buying in cash so I didn't bother, likewise with the survey.

 

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We're in process of buying a house... The mortgage company asked for a "mining" survey after seeing the "general" land survey. They've now asked for a different mining survey. This I believe is because the house is on the site of an old brickworks (200 years ago). Several of these 1950s houses bought and sold since 2000, I wonder if lenders are trying find a reason not to lend?

You may be right itrt they don't want to lend unless they are sure the asset is worth it, and they may have previous experience on this particular issue.

I doubt though they would want to manufacture reasons not to lend. If they want to reign in lending that will be applied on granting agreements in principle on future potential mortgages rather than cancelling existing ones.

It's not like someone rushes into the office of a Monday morning and shouts, put on the brakes and cancel everything NOW !

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Get someone to do a desk study. 

a civil engineer should be able to do it. not that expensive. 

I heard about someone buying a house and got a desk study done, turned out the land the house was on was once an experimental nuclear reactor site, so for peace of mind it’s worth getting done. 

 

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Might be worth looking at a geological map of the area. Brickworks are quite often built on clay. Clays can expand and contract more than other rock types, which may cause a house bulit on clay to be more at risk of susidence issues.

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if this is an old brickworks you may have two issues, issue one is that often these had coal associated with them, the second issue is that often the clay pits were used as a landfill. So you have mining subsidence, mine gas and potential landfill gas. It may be fine but you need to do local authority searches, ask if the site was a former landfill is it subject to any part 2a action, is it on the councils contaminated land strategy. This in addition to further mining searches. 1950 to 2000 houses are the worst for this as they were often built with insufficient or absent gas protection. 

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We're in process of buying a house... The mortgage company asked for a "mining" survey after seeing the "general" land survey. They've now asked for a different mining survey. This I believe is because the house is on the site of an old brickworks (200 years ago). Several of these 1950s houses bought and sold since 2000, I wonder if lenders are trying find a reason not to lend?

The banks do this sort of thing to reduce their exposure to risk, it just means they don’t want any issues selling the place from under you if you stop being their cash cow 

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Get someone to do a desk study. 

a civil engineer should be able to do it. not that expensive. 

I heard about someone buying a house and got a desk study done, turned out the land the house was on was once an experimental nuclear reactor site, so for peace of mind it’s worth getting done. 

 

That saves on electricity costs - glowing in the dark is a feature.

 

I'll get my coat...

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Might be worth looking at a geological map of the area. Brickworks are quite often built on clay. Clays can expand and contract more than other rock types, which may cause a house bulit on clay to be more at risk of susidence issues.

Also, the house might be standing on a formerly excavated site that has been afterwards backfiled with all sorts of rubbish and remains unstable. I have seen a house like that in Smethwick. One wall had cracks all over because that side of the building was slowly sinking into such a pit. 

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Also, the house might be standing on a formerly excavated site that has been afterwards backfiled with all sorts of rubbish and remains unstable. I have seen a house like that in Smethwick. One wall had cracks all over because that side of the building was slowly sinking into such a pit. 

I believe it is a backfilled clay quarry. However six houses on the site, built in 1950s. Our surveyor found no signs of subsidence.

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Also, the house might be standing on a formerly excavated site that has been afterwards backfiled with all sorts of rubbish and remains unstable. I have seen a house like that in Smethwick. One wall had cracks all over because that side of the building was slowly sinking into such a pit. 

Backfilled with what ?   

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I’d recommend having a survey. I’ve seen a couple of 60s/70s houses near this former brickworks with subsidence, which were unmortgageable.

https://www.bucksfreepress.co.uk/news/18280204.wooburn-sinkhole-middle-sappers-field-getting-bigger/

A 40-foot deep sinkhole that opened up in the middle of a popular Wooburn playing field amid recent heavy rain is getting even bigger.

The massive hole opened on the site of a former brickworks which was filled in by army engineers to create a recreational area.

Local history for the area...

http://flackwellheath.net/old-site/download-area/history/flackwell-heath-now-and-then-by-reg-wilks.pdf

The Kilnwood part of this estate was a small copse of mostly fir trees. There was a very deep dell or pit, which, it is said, was once a brick kiln. Old Heathens assure me that there definitely were bricks made but it came to an abrupt end when the few men operating the kiln left one day for a pint at a nearby Inn, when they returned, found that the pit had caved in, burying the kiln and it’s equipment. Apparently, the men decided to call it a day so presumably the kiln sunk without a trace so to speak.

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Any idea how I'd find out what a hole was backfilled with? I'm unsure whether the backfill took place when brickyard ceased in 1800s, or when houses were built in 1950s.

Round here (South East), you have to have a test borehole drilled as part of the prep for a new build house, foundations can then be designed accordingly.

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Round here (South East), you have to have a test borehole drilled as part of the prep for a new build house, foundations can then be designed accordingly.

Sounds like something to be done when building a house rather than 70 years after? (Unless signs of subsidence of course)

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We're in process of buying a house... The mortgage company asked for a "mining" survey after seeing the "general" land survey. They've now asked for a different mining survey. This I believe is because the house is on the site of an old brickworks (200 years ago). Several of these 1950s houses bought and sold since 2000, I wonder if lenders are trying find a reason not to lend?

Yes, you are right! They are very conscious & concern about there jobs...  

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I’d recommend having a survey. I’ve seen a couple of 60s/70s houses near this former brickworks with subsidence, which were unmortgageable.

https://www.bucksfreepress.co.uk/news/18280204.wooburn-sinkhole-middle-sappers-field-getting-bigger/

A 40-foot deep sinkhole that opened up in the middle of a popular Wooburn playing field amid recent heavy rain is getting even bigger.

The massive hole opened on the site of a former brickworks which was filled in by army engineers to create a recreational area.

Local history for the area...

http://flackwellheath.net/old-site/download-area/history/flackwell-heath-now-and-then-by-reg-wilks.pdf

The Kilnwood part of this estate was a small copse of mostly fir trees. There was a very deep dell or pit, which, it is said, was once a brick kiln. Old Heathens assure me that there definitely were bricks made but it came to an abrupt end when the few men operating the kiln left one day for a pint at a nearby Inn, when they returned, found that the pit had caved in, burying the kiln and it’s equipment. Apparently, the men decided to call it a day so presumably the kiln sunk without a trace so to speak.

We had a survey, but the surveyor didn't want to see or know about the mining survey report! Very strange. Perhaps they look for signs of subsidence, regardless of what reports say?

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  • 439 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • Even
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      • up 5%



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