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Sunday Times PricedOut Article


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Anyone else seen the PricedOut article in the propety section of today's Sunday times?

Half a page long, saying we shouldn't cheer house price rises. Mention too of salaries not keeping up with HPI, Boomers' unearned wealth and poor protection on the rental sector.

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Recently started buying the Sunday Times again, mainly because they dare to cover topics others won’t touch. 

Very good.

Really?  I assumed they were very like "The Times", i.e. promoting a rather establishment point of view, somewhere between New Labour and David Cameron Conservative (having written that, I'm not sure there is a difference).

 

Used to love reading the Sunday Times in the 90s, but then the internet came along, wouldn't mind getting back into reading a Sunday paper, now I am the right age for it!!

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Recently started buying the Sunday Times again, mainly because they dare to cover topics others won’t touch. 

Very good.

Oddly enough I have given up on the Sunday Times. Just found there was little in the way of actual newsworthy content.  To be fair the coverage of the Indian election was very good and informative but the stuff about the US election is just the usual anti Trump ranting.

The only bit I enjoyed reading recently has been the the culture section with book reviews.  

The sports coverage is excellent but Walsh going on about drugs every week is utterly tedious and Stephen Jones support of Saracens in spite of the fact they have admitted to cheating the salary cap for a decade is staggering to all club rugby fans.  

Every week in the magazine there is an article about some one somewhere who has been discriminated against.  I accept there are discrimination issues but the same story with a different name every week is as tedious and Walsh and his drugs articles.  

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Of course it’s establishment but they seem to allow a breadth of opinion these days. 

They (Andrew Norfolk) broke the Rotherham child abuse cover up, and they’re still questioning the govt on why the related abuse rings were ignored for so long. 

And they’re piping up about freedom of speech, which seems to get ignored by the Guardian (the Observer is marginally better) or Telegraph (I know a young Tory at the Telegraph, alas). 

All newspapers in the UK have an agenda, their owners’ have bought them for this purpose. I’m fine using the free ones for standard news but with a relaxing beverage on the weekend it’s the Times for me now. 

Next thing I’ll be wearing red trousers. 

 

 

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They (Andrew Norfolk) broke the Rotherham child abuse cover up, and they’re still questioning the govt on why the related abuse rings were ignored for so long. 

Fair point but the reason they were ignored was everyone is scared to death of critisising anything to do with Islam or the muslim community.  This is where all the race card playing works against the wider community and decent people.  The police know that if they take action they will be accused of racism and will have the Guardian and the buffoons on FB and twitter all over them.  Students and teachers will protest as will people like Corbyn.  In that situation its is natural that the police who are just doing a job and looking after their family and paying the bills will hope that someone else gets up above the parapet and not themselves.  

 

And they’re piping up about freedom of speech, which seems to get ignored by the Guardian (the Observer is marginally better) or Telegraph (I know a young Tory at the Telegraph, alas). 

Agreed the Guardian is very liberal in it's views as long as people agree with their stance.  

 

Next thing I’ll be wearing red trousers. 

I saw some in a ship in Henley last week.  A snip at just £130.00.

I will get the Times this Sunday and ignore Walks Jones and the magazine :) 

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I have been saying for several years that eventually these angry (avocado eating) kids will actually be 30 somethings and running the place. 

Summarised very much by the paragraph in the article In the year I was born, 1992, first-time buyers paid £49,000 for a home and the average national income was £21,000.”. 

Increasingly this young generation will be voting more, influencing politics, business and media more because old f4rts like me are no longer in charge. 

Thin end of the wedge and absolutely the right thing. I can’t believe just how much they have been shafted. £40k degrees for average jobs, Help to Borrow to prop up our houses, dip into your pensions young ones to feed a a generation above. 

I had nothing when I started out and for many years after that but I had a house, security, a good pension and security of employment. That gave me the hope to dream..

The younger generation have no security, no pension, no ability to buy and that gives no hope. 

Pandemic sweeps the country with deaths so the government waived stamp duty to protect house prices...you couldn’t make that up.

Their time is coming and my only surprise it it’s taken them so long. 

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I have been saying for several years that eventually these angry (avocado eating) kids will actually be 30 somethings and running the place. 

Summarised very much by the paragraph in the article In the year I was born, 1992, first-time buyers paid £49,000 for a home and the average national income was £21,000.”. 

Increasingly this young generation will be voting more, influencing politics, business and media more because old f4rts like me are no longer in charge. 

Thin end of the wedge and absolutely the right thing. I can’t believe just how much they have been shafted. £40k degrees for average jobs, Help to Borrow to prop up our houses, dip into your pensions young ones to feed a a generation above. 

I had nothing when I started out and for many years after that but I had a house, security, a good pension and security of employment. That gave me the hope to dream..

The younger generation have no security, no pension, no ability to buy and that gives no hope. 

Pandemic sweeps the country with deaths so the government waived stamp duty to protect house prices...you couldn’t make that up.

Their time is coming and my only surprise it it’s taken them so long. 

Some very good points. The older generation now find themselves exposed. Go to work and risk catching the virus or bail out? The young may take up the reins sooner than expected.

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I have been saying for several years that eventually these angry (avocado eating) kids will actually be 30 somethings and running the place. 

Summarised very much by the paragraph in the article In the year I was born, 1992, first-time buyers paid £49,000 for a home and the average national income was £21,000.”. 

Increasingly this young generation will be voting more, influencing politics, business and media more because old f4rts like me are no longer in charge. 

Thin end of the wedge and absolutely the right thing. I can’t believe just how much they have been shafted. £40k degrees for average jobs, Help to Borrow to prop up our houses, dip into your pensions young ones to feed a a generation above. 

I had nothing when I started out and for many years after that but I had a house, security, a good pension and security of employment. That gave me the hope to dream..

The younger generation have no security, no pension, no ability to buy and that gives no hope. 

Pandemic sweeps the country with deaths so the government waived stamp duty to protect house prices...you couldn’t make that up.

Their time is coming and my only surprise it it’s taken them so long. 

I think the figures are slightly wrong.  I am pretty sure £21k was not average income in 92 - but on the whole they are right.

 

Of course it doesn't mention immigration at all all, despite the fact that the government says more households cause prices to rise.

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I think the figures are slightly wrong.  I am pretty sure £21k was not average income in 92 - but on the whole they are right.

 

Of course it doesn't mention immigration at all all, despite the fact that the government says more households cause prices to rise.

Good point...although I just checked at the ONS data suggests it’s surprisingly household income is not that far out (Looking at a small graph so I cant be too accurate). It’s still less than £40k. 

Really the highlight was the fact she was born in 1992. I had been working 6 years already 😆😆

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Good point...although I just checked at the ONS data suggests it’s surprisingly household income is not that far out (Looking at a small graph so I cant be too accurate). It’s still less than £40k. 

Really the highlight was the fact she was born in 1992. I had been working 6 years already 😆😆

I wasn't quite that old in 92 but this did make me feel old as well.

One good thing for Labour is that a lot of people who feel upset about this will not remember the Labour part of HPI.

I am quite happy for the Tories to be blamed - not so happy that the other parties escape.  They should all suffer and ideally be replaced by other parties.

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I think the figures are slightly wrong.  I am pretty sure £21k was not average income in 92 - but on the whole they are right.

 

Of course it doesn't mention immigration at all all, despite the fact that the government says more households cause prices to rise.

~£15k for full time workers according the ONS, which will be the mean.

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I have been saying for several years that eventually these angry (avocado eating) kids will actually be 30 somethings and running the place. 

Summarised very much by the paragraph in the article In the year I was born, 1992, first-time buyers paid £49,000 for a home and the average national income was £21,000.”. 

Increasingly this young generation will be voting more, influencing politics, business and media more because old f4rts like me are no longer in charge. 

Thin end of the wedge and absolutely the right thing. I can’t believe just how much they have been shafted. £40k degrees for average jobs, Help to Borrow to prop up our houses, dip into your pensions young ones to feed a a generation above. 

I had nothing when I started out and for many years after that but I had a house, security, a good pension and security of employment. That gave me the hope to dream..

The younger generation have no security, no pension, no ability to buy and that gives no hope. 

Pandemic sweeps the country with deaths so the government waived stamp duty to protect house prices...you couldn’t make that up.

Their time is coming and my only surprise it it’s taken them so long. 

Well put 

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I wasn't quite that old in 92 but this did make me feel old as well.

One good thing for Labour is that a lot of people who feel upset about this will not remember the Labour part of HPI.

I am quite happy for the Tories to be blamed - not so happy that the other parties escape.  They should all suffer and ideally be replaced by other parties.

I am a leftie liberal, guardian reading, terrorist sympathising, bleeding heart snowflake (translation that means I don’t like the Tories)....but I have been looking carefully at prices for my son to ensure we not only get a comparative steal (that’s a given) but historical value. 

What has struck me is allowing for normal inflation I can get something (with patience and a little refurb) at 2004/5 prices. Not easy but doable. 

However again allowing for inflation those prices in 1996 - 1999 have just gone completely. 

Now I know we can say the Tories set things up for rises and the base in 1995 was very low after years of falls but the Blair regime did oversee prices rise hugely in real terms. 

Because u r numerate😉... you will know what I mean by allowing for inflation. We look back now and houses selling for £150k in 2004 equate to say £210k today (or even 230k using CPI) . They are actually £195k / £275k depending on condition. So we will get one at £200k requiring a very visible but inexpensive refurb. 

I need to be wary not to sound like a troll. Ie prices haven’t really gone up much since 2004...but actually we all know they have. This is in my location and also we are dealing with averages and bandwidth. If I were buying in 2004 I wouldn’t be paying £150k..I would trying to get the same house for £120k.😆

Lets see how things pan out over the next few months....I feel sentiment is beginning to change as the dark nights have arrived. Waiting for the frost....probates coming through now, siblings agitated because they want the money for the new car...I am getting my old fishing rod out and patiently cleaning it. 

Ps and if my son does buy I won’t be on here justifying it. He makes his own decision and is worried about falls and knows prices are high....but once he listens to my advice and reassure me he understands all the factors and decides he still wants to buy my job will be to steal something for him. That’s the only reason he has engaged me...because he knows my history was a property thief. Now I can use my power for good...well maybe not good but not for evil 😆😆

Edited by Pop321
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~£15k for full time workers according the ONS, which will be the mean.

You can prove anything with facts. Stick to forum etiquette please and make stuff up. 😆 

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I need to be wary not to sound like a troll. Ie prices haven’t really gone up much since 2004...but actually we all know they have. This is in my location and also we are dealing with averages and bandwidth. If I were buying in 2004 I wouldn’t be paying £150k..I would trying to get the same house for £120k.😆

 

Since 2004 I would guess some places have got cheaper with regards to inflation and some a lot more expensive.  For example I have family in the North West and the house they rent was bought IIRC in 2016 for a very similar price to 2007.  If you think about the cost of the mortgage etc and wage rises, it is probably cheaper now than in 2007.

However in London HTB has caused prices to rocket.  For example 30% rise between 2014- 2016 for one of my neighbours

I would have thought that HTB would have had the same effect nationwide - anyone know why it didn't?

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Since 2004 I would guess some places have got cheaper with regards to inflation and some a lot more expensive.  For example I have family in the North West and the house they rent was bought IIRC in 2016 for a very similar price to 2007.  If you think about the cost of the mortgage etc and wage rises, it is probably cheaper now than in 2007.

However in London HTB has caused prices to rocket.  For example 30% rise between 2014- 2016 for one of my neighbours

I would have thought that HTB would have had the same effect nationwide - anyone know why it didn't?

Because deposit size was not the limiting factor in house prices nationwide.

Young people "only having" £30k deposit in cash was Limiting to prices in London, not in Liverpool.

 

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Because deposit size was not the limiting factor in house prices nationwide.

Young people "only having" £30k deposit in cash was Limiting to prices in London, not in Liverpool.

 

That makes sense so HTB was basically transferring cash from the tax payer to people exiting or down sizing the London housing market and of course estate agents etc

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That makes sense so HTB was basically transferring cash from the tax payer to people exiting or down sizing the London housing market and of course estate agents etc

Builders really. See £110m bonuses awarded to directors... share prices tripled as well.

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  • 439 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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