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Boarding a loft (with trusses)


Jason

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Hi All

Thought I would ask here, as you're all so knowledagble. I want to board my loft, it's a new build house so trusses with 30cm or so of insulation. So far I've changed the loft hatch to a fancy pull down one with steps, all well and good. I've got an electician coming to add a socket, and lights..

Next I want to board, and was going to use the loft zone system. However, that's going to cost approx £800 with me doing it myself - and I hate the idea of moving about all that insulation. I'm only boarding the centre, but want it to extend past the truss (the W framework). I have a quote of £2.5k for a pro to do it with the loft zone, or £2k with studd work.

My question is why can't I just add in a second joist between the trusses. So, bascially it makes a new floor above the current insulation and is only supported at the ends (or 20% in from the ends). the gap between the trusses (the bottom bits of the "W") is only 1.9 mtr. I've done a crude diagram below:

 

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The new floor would be the blue (2.4mtr or 3 mtr lengths), with the loft boards going on the top. This would be easier to do, and cost approx £350-400 with a belt and braces approach.

To me, it seems stronger than putting the load through the joist. However I can't find anything online. I'm aware the max load is 25kg/square meter permenant load.

 

This is for light storage, and a scalatrix when my little one is old enough to want one :) !

 

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Hi All

Thought I would ask here, as you're all so knowledagble. I want to board my loft, it's a new build house so trusses with 30cm or so of insulation. So far I've changed the loft hatch to a fancy pull down one with steps, all well and good. I've got an electician coming to add a socket, and lights..

 

Sorry can't help you more but I will say I hated insulating (celotex and rockwool). It's an absolute grind of a job (rockwool is itchy af) and the smallest gap in celotex can cause problems (cold/moisture zone). Next time I would 100% pay someone else. 

 

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Sorry can't help you more but I will say I hated insulating (celotex and rockwool). It's an absolute grind of a job (rockwool is itchy af) and the smallest gap in celotex can cause problems (cold/moisture zone). Next time I would 100% pay someone else.

There's the sheep's wool version. It's nowhere near as bad on the itchy front but costs a lot more and I'm not persuaded that it has a long-term ability to avoid going mouldy (I pulled a load out of my shed that someone had lined the walls there with - but not the roof, which rather reduced the point of it - and that had all gone very mouldy where water had got in and the wood started to rot too).

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There's the sheep's wool version. It's nowhere near as bad on the itchy front but costs a lot more and I'm not persuaded that it has a long-term ability to avoid going mouldy (I pulled a load out of my shed that someone had lined the walls there with - but not the roof, which rather reduced the point of it - and that had all gone very mouldy where water had got in and the wood started to rot too).

Which tempted me (eco etc) but we bought this place as an untouched time capsule (complete with 60s oven containing asbestos) and it came with moths. Last thing I needed were moths flying out the roof. I've since found there is one company that makes wool insulation that moths won't touch and that isn't chock full of chemicals, but it's too late for us now. 

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Which tempted me (eco etc) but we bought this place as an untouched time capsule (complete with 60s oven containing asbestos) and it came with moths. Last thing I needed were moths flying out the roof. I've since found there is one company that makes wool insulation that moths won't touch and that isn't chock full of chemicals, but it's too late for us now. 

Moths can be an issue with it. It has to be treated with something to prevent it.

I'm not tempted by things on the eco front but I was tempted by it on the "sounds suitably old-fashioned even if it's fairly modern" front, but after a bit of looking in to it I decided I wasn't confident enough in it's long-term suitability. I'd still keep the itchy stuff, no point in getting rid of it, but a little more on top would be useful.

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