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Car Ownership Is Becoming As Appealing As Smoking


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We’ll see.  

Short term, Covid has put many back in their cars and away from public transport.

People who wear masks in their cars aren’t likely to ever travel on public transport again for the rest of their lives.  Scared witless.

Electric driverless taxis are a fantasy until quantum computing combines with 5g to produce a world that’s too scary to contemplate.  But at least you won’t have to drive your own car which is such a pain and soooo difficult.....  

 

 

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I average cycling in the city circa 18mph better than your 12.

In my car's defence, I've done a little bit shopping in that time too.

 

Yeah I take your point, for many who live in the county, personal transport is essential, but we have millions of people in the UK who drive 1 mile on the school run and another mile to go shopping and are paying thousands per year to do this.

Maybe they don't care and if that is the case, then good luck to them.

Absolutely pointless to have a car if you're in a city, especially some hellhole like London. I don't see the point of renting them out at a few £100 pm either. Buy one for a few grand, sorted for a few years

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Well a car has always been a money pit really.

 

That is just the way the Govt likes it. It provides them with lots of tax money, and keeps the number of cars on the roads down, so saving them the cost of providing proper infrastructure.

The most economical cars to run are small petrol vehicles, even better if they are old, bought for peanuts and kept running.

But Govt tax policy is forcing these off the roads. Soon the only cars we will be able to buy will be expensive electric or hybrid ones, which only the rich can afford.

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Running a car costs personal finance and the planet a massive hit.

Many young people are now laughing at the idea of owning and running a depreciating sh1tbox that makes fat gamon even more lazy than they already are.

IMO, the car industry is over.  Completely finished actually. 

During this time of "lockdown", many are realising that taking a taxi (or walking......fecking shock of shocks.......humans have legs)  is cheaper than running a sh1tbox for a year, but with much less hassle and more fitness.

 

Fook BMW, Merc and Ford.  They will all be next to go bust as the new world moves on without them and their desperate attempts to "go green".

The car industry..........lol.   It's already dead, but the dumb punters have yet to catch up.

What a lot of rubbish.

I bought a 63 plate car in May 2018 for £7800. Even on eBay the same car sells for £6000 two and a half years later. (Under £70 depreciation a month). With £0 road tax and insurance of just £180 a year the car is incredibly inexpensive.

When you have a young family a car is a must. I run a lot and walk most local journeys around my area,  but a car is essential for basic day to day living like taking the kids to nursery or doing the weekly shop.

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I can drive 6 miles to a supermarket, do a brief shop, and drive home in 30 minutes. Public transport would be about 3 hours. bowlochs to that. You ain't seeing the end of cars anytime soon.

Or send in an online order at lunchtime and get it delivered that evening. I don't think I've been to a supermarket in six months.

I suspect our next car will be the last one we buy because I don't seem much reason to want to travel any more. I'd rather live in a cabin in the woods away from this idiocy.

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We don't have kids but did have two cars. Been thinking on this a while. Today we walked into town (12 minutes into a nice market town). Hit up the local independent hardware store for two screws and raw plugs (coat rack to go up in hall) but bought gardening gloves, a coal shovel (soz Greta) and of all things a fat hairy snake for cleaning out radiators! Then to charity shops for some random dinner party games and a couple of dvds (bargains), then lunch in a pub that has the best Thai food we've ever had and then went to Aldi for some random bits. 

We did all this without a car! Works out i get about 1 mile to the pint and the other half a mile to a medium merlot. 

I'm frugal, my last car coat 8k and i ran it for 130k miles and ten years. When it died i bought another one for 10k... vw gti. But I'm thinking that's 10k towards my house renovations and a recurring run rate of savings. 

I'm lucky living near a good town, being able to work from home and with really good local transport links. Car is very handy though, and lots of fun when the roads are clear. 

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I live in the countryside 2 miles from the nearest shops and 7 miles from the nearest town centre. There are very few buses, maybe 4 a day.

And as its Wales it is seriously hilly everywhere.

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When you have a young family a car is a must. I run a lot and walk most local journeys around my area,  but a car is essential for basic day to day living like taking the kids to nursery or doing the weekly shop.

Without a car, we simply would not have been able to hold down jobs and ferry the children to school/nursery in good time.  Since lockdown, we've used it a handful of times and for work, we tend to use public transport.  

 

Look like there are problems ahead for families who rely quite heavily on the convenience of having a car.  Maybe we can clear the roads of all the peasants to allow the 4x4 the freedom they deserve.  

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/oct/16/london-congestion-charge-zone-clapham-catford-tfl-tube

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Without a car, we simply would not have been able to hold down jobs and ferry the children to school/nursery in good time.  Since lockdown, we've used it a handful of times and for work, we tend to use public transport.  

 

Look like there are problems ahead for families who rely quite heavily on the convenience of having a car.  Maybe we can clear the roads of all the peasants to allow the 4x4 the freedom they deserve.  

 

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2020/oct/16/london-congestion-charge-zone-clapham-catford-tfl-tube

I live next to two schools in west London. These people are idiots, total idiots. They even thrown their hands up in the cabin of the 4x4 when they've got to move off the illegal parking on the corner to allow the bin lorry through. Just tax these idiots off the road or, preferably, ban their vehicles from certain streets.

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Yeah it's getting to the point where if you walked in with £20k in cash, they would rather sell to a PCP peasant than take the cash off you. 

 

Feck them and their bent finance schemes.

That's because they make so little money on actually selling the car, there is more to be made on the finance commission.

For run of the mill cars those ridiculous prices are probably little more than the build cost.  

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I live next to two schools in west London. These people are idiots, total idiots. They even thrown their hands up in the cabin of the 4x4 when they've got to move off the illegal parking on the corner to allow the bin lorry through. Just tax these idiots off the road or, preferably, ban their vehicles from certain streets.

I agree.  I'm not sure of the purpose of 4x4's on narrow city streets and I find it very irritating when the said driver charges down a narrow street towards you, refusing to yield.  When I'm feeling really grumpy and am not in a hurry, I too refuse to yield to their intimidation.  This can be problematic as the traffic backs up and other drivers become equally irritable.  My record is about 10 mins of refusing to budge until they reversed.  Sometimes, you need to make a point.

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That has made my Sunday ! Best laugh I have had for ages 

EV’s and PHEV’s highest ever sales in July and increasingly in the luxury segment 

https://electrek.co/2020/09/22/taycan-electric-car-porsches-best-selling-car-destroys-panamera-sales/

More people moving to the suburbs or further afield which are car centric 

For petrol heads like me the less s*** boxes on the road the better - better experience 

Cars were and are one of most democratic means of transport - freeing millions to work, live and holiday where they want 

Rather like working from home the low car sales are just a trend brought forward - the industry was in a state of flux anyway due to the dirty diesel vibe and the new tech on the horizon - new car sales were stalling before covid excuse the pun

A scenario for you - I want to go out in London on a Saturday night - congestion charge £15 - I can park on a single yellow after 6. It’s rainy and - wet - it’s about 25 miles each way for me so even at 20mpg costs me say another £15. I am in my own little cocoon with my music, my hygiene regime - so both ways have cost me less than a modest Uber trip one way ?

I breeze past people fiddling with their phones waiting for a taxi and cyclists - it’s like something from the thirties 

What your actually celebrating is wealth inequality - in that I have the choice.

Car ownership will probably gently decline thats a good thing - too many multi car families in crowded cities

As I said volunteering for wealth inequality best laugh I have had for ages 

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-8504289/Luxury-car-sales-hit-11-year-high-people-buy-new-Aston-Martins-Audis-BMWs.html

 

 

 

 

Edited by GregBowman
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I agree.  I'm not sure of the purpose of 4x4's on narrow city streets and I find it very irritating when the said driver charges down a narrow street towards you, refusing to yield.  When I'm feeling really grumpy and am not in a hurry, I too refuse to yield to their intimidation.  This can be problematic as the traffic backs up and other drivers become equally irritable.  My record is about 10 mins of refusing to budge until they reversed.  Sometimes, you need to make a point.

Some people are incapable of reversing their vehicle!

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Bought my first car (a Ford) in 2000 second-hand for £250 - it belonged to an old granny who just ran it occasionally down to the shops, so although it was ancient (one of those manual chokes you had to pull out to get it going in the morning), it had a really low mileage. I used that for a year getting me to and from work, and sold it for £300 to someone who'd just passed their test. I believe within a few months he crashed it, but it was still going.

In the years that have followed I've just bought inexpensive second-hand cars. Okay, so not in the £250 range any more, but no more than 2-3k. Maybe I've gotten lucky, but I've had a good run out of them over the years, and just run them into the ground over 6 or more years per car.

Living out in a very rural part of the countryside, a car is a necessity for me; but I've no interest in cars themselves, nor keeping up with the Joneses. My wife works in insurance, so we get a cheap deal. The only real expense is fuel and the very occasional high maintenance jobs, like a belt change.

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Ok Count, my car is a 8 year old Hyundai I10 76000 miles owned from 5 months worth about 2k., tax is £20 itll last another 10 years . I like it and smile when I think of folks spunking a fortune just to have a flash motor on the drive.

You're beating the system 🙂 

You're not supposed to buy just 1 car, you're meant to get a new shiny one every 3 years and worry about any scratch on it and whether or not you can drive it in case you go over your mileage.

Shame on you.

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Id love to lose a car but its not practical. In fact were expecting our 3rd child so actually need to buy a bigger car soon. 

Was hoping to pick up a bargain once furlough ends, but im slightly concerned the second market may actually go up when people get their Range Rovers repo'd

Jump in now or wait? 

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A car is a wonderful convenience.  Having no contingency in regard to essential activities is dumb though.  Living in a nuclear family away from support structure, then placing kids in a far away school whilst working far away, somewhere else, is just plain stupid, or gambling at best.

Know 'clever' people who have done this.

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Running a car costs personal finance and the planet a massive hit.

Many young people are now laughing at the idea of owning and running a depreciating sh1tbox that makes fat gamon even more lazy than they already are.

IMO, the car industry is over.  Completely finished actually. 

During this time of "lockdown", many are realising that taking a taxi (or walking......fecking shock of shocks.......humans have legs)  is cheaper than running a sh1tbox for a year, but with much less hassle and more fitness.

 

Fook BMW, Merc and Ford.  They will all be next to go bust as the new world moves on without them and their desperate attempts to "go green".

The car industry..........lol.   It's already dead, but the dumb punters have yet to catch up.

Wrong, they will all be mostly Tesla, and all self driving. You will have the choice when you buy you Tesla to keep it 100% private, or sign up to the "Tesla Taxi" network.  For this your Tesla will go off and taxi other people about via self driving and Tesla will retain 30% of the fare, you will keep the other 70%. But you will be responsible for all running costs.

This is the future, a huge number of self driving cars to be able to hail for cheap via an app 24/7.

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A car is a refuge; choose comfortable heated seats, a license to operate, total freedom of movement; an airy, light and spacious environment from here to where, when everywhere won't feel like nowhere forever. Sweet petrol fed through 6, 8 or 12 British cylinders and a visceral sense of poise and spatial positioning through aural feedback. Choose progress atavistically. 

Banned for new sale from 2030 , illegal to drive on public roads from 2050 (or sooner). They just have not announced the 2nd bit yet, They will in 2035ish.

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Growing up in a family without a car and school and shops being within easy walking distance, learning to drive was never something I ever really thought about.

 

It's coloured my choices as an adult when it comes to where I live.  Distance to work, the supermaket and the nearest bus stop in to town are always at the top of my list over everything else.  It also means I have to plan for things ahead of time but I can't say it stops me doing anything

 

A car would be very convenient but I can't miss what I've never had.

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Yeah I take your point about needing a 'mobile home' to carry push chairs and bottle bags.

Each family needs to add up the expense of running a couple of cars a year, versus the alternatives. 

See, in the 20th century a car was a status symbol, whereas in 2020 it's another debt chain around your neck to rival a mortgage and imo it isn't worth the hassle.

 

You do realise every penny saved, or extra £ earned, for any activity, if on a national scale, only goes to one place?  Higher House prices. 

1970's , vast majority 1 earner households, cheap house prices, 1990;s , vast majority 2 income households, house prices shoot up. 2000's, Gov introduce "childcare vouchers to help with the rising cost of childcare with 2 parents having to work. Result, the value of childcare vouchers goes into rising house prices. 2020 each 2 working household needs 2 cars, 2030 no cars, the old cost of cars goes into rising house prices. 

Man people are dumb.

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I average cycling in the city circa 18mph better than your 12.

Go to Aldi, fill a trolly with a weekly shop, pack it into 4 of their large reusable bags, probably will weigh total 30kgs. Now hold onto those on your pushbike and cycle home. lol.

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Go to Aldi, fill a trolly with a weekly shop, pack it into 4 of their large reusable bags, probably will weigh total 30kgs. Now hold onto those on your pushbike and cycle home. lol.

Not a problem.

Cube Cargo 2021 Electric Hybrid Bike

Built around Bosch's powerful fourth-generation Cargo Line drive and a stepless, low-maintenance hub gear system, the Cube Cargo Hybrid is an e-bike that makes light work of your transport needs. The EPP foam cargo box carries your load safely - with an optional seat and canopy for your kids - and a 650b rear wheel and 20in front, both fitted with big-volume tyres for grip and comfort, provide the ideal blend of stability and manoeuvrability - even when you're pedalling with a heavy load. Powerful four-piston hydraulic disc brakes help keep your speed in check, and it even includes full-length mudguards and bright front and rear LED lights.

Most bicycles are designed to carry one person and, perhaps, some luggage. But the Cargo Hybrid's rugged design allows far heavier loads to be carried safely, thanks to an aluminium frame that's stiff enough to carry up to two children as passengers in complete safety. Handling is stable and confidence-inspiring, so that navigating city streets is a breeze. The powerful Bosch drive unit sits unobtrusively at the base of the seat tube, whilst there's space for up to two batteries located near the bike's centre of gravity for impeccable road manners and easy access.

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Introducing the mamachari.

http://www.tokyobybike.com/2009/06/introducing-mamachari.html

DSCF3772.jpg

The mamachari is a cultural icon, it's the Japanese equivalent of the family station wagon. Its the family workhorse used on shopping runs, for riding to the local station, taking the kids to school or picking them up from sports practice. Without it families around the country would be in a right pickle.

The defining features include, a top tube bent low that is easy to step over, a shopping basket on the front, a luggage rack on the back, mudguards, chain guards, dynamo lights, an integrated lock, a bell and a hefty rear stand that keeps the bike stable and upright when parked.

Oh, I forgot, one of the most defining features of the mamachari which is brakes that go "SCREEEEEEEEEEEECH!" when even slightly feathered, startling everyone within earshot.

After purchasing a mamachari, the upgrade of choice is a child seat. These can be mounted on the rear luggage rack or behind/between/in front of the handlebars. It's not unusual for a mamachari to sport two child seats, and on occasion you'll spot one with three! When the government implemented a ban recently on carrying two children on a mamachari mothers across Japan campaigned against the ruling and the government was forced to back down.

Usually priced between Y10,000 and Y20,000 mamachari are essentially considered a disposable item. They're regularly left exposed to the elements for long periods of time, and for the most part are poorly maintained, even putting air in the tires seems a chore. Most people would throw a mamachari away or abandon it after years of neglect rather than undertaking simple preventative maintenance to extend the bikes useful life.

When buying a bicycle most Japanese don't consider anything other than a mamachari and initially I found this odd because when I think of bicycles I think recreation, mountain biking, commuting, racing, or for getting air off the top of a set of stairs. But in Japan I realized I'm in the minority, as even your average Japanese male purchases a bike for its utility, for making short trips to the station with a briefcase in the basket and carrying groceries home from the supermarket etc.

In a country of 130 million people 85% own a bicycle. Who'd have guessed that the majority use their bikes for practical purposes rather than jumping gaps?

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  • 439 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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