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The younger generations have never known suffering


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According to my elderly mum, her house price is being put at risk by the pandemic and that's young people's fault for going out and spreading the virus, and they should be responsible and stay in to protect 'society's wealth'. Which her generation created for them.

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No ofcourse not.  Having to face 2 financial crisis events which enriched anyone with assets in 12 years.  No problem whatsoever....

Even my parents and in-laws now get the severity of the situation.  No more "when are you buying??".

Edited by blackhole
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When people like my idiot parents and Phil Spencer s complaining then I assume things are going in the right direction, for now.

(This is the woman who told me to stay away from a particular kid at school because he was brain damaged, and thinks nobody in their street should sell their house to a black person, keep it white and friendly, like she says)

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Bar funding her care home - a one in four chance of needing it for that - why does your elderly mother care about her house price?

 

Because she can look down her nose at people and pretend she's Warren Buffet, I conclude.

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According to my elderly mum, her house price is being put at risk by the pandemic and that's young people's fault for going out and spreading the virus, and they should be responsible and stay in to protect 'society's wealth'. Which her generation created for them.

Liverpool isn't it?

From the half heard buts on the radio from a bunch of Northern mayors it's apparently Fatchers fault.

 

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Liverpool isn't it?

From the half heard buts on the radio from a bunch of Northern mayors it's apparently Fatchers fault.

 

The eighties was indeed tough. But they're not the only ones.

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1 hour ago, Si1 said:

According to my elderly mum, her house price is being put at risk by the pandemic and that's young people's fault for going out and spreading the virus, and they should be responsible and stay in to protect 'society's wealth'. Which her generation created for them.

Let me guess - something about WW2 and rationing despite being born in 1950?

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2 hours ago, Si1 said:

When people like my idiot parents and Phil Spencer s complaining then I assume things are going in the right direction, for now.

(This is the woman who told me to stay away from a particular kid at school because he was brain damaged, and thinks nobody in their street should sell their house to a black person, keep it white and friendly, like she says)

It'd be the sweetest irony if, when she's in her care home, her most tender and empathetic bum-wiper is a slightly brain damaged black person. 

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She was actually born during the war. But yeah.

I probably shouldn't say this but why are you coming on a public forum to sl*g off your mum - she gave you life?

Won't you (part) inherit her overpriced house one day.

How old was she when the war ended?

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No ofcourse not.  Having to face 2 financial crisis events which enriched anyone with assets in 12 years.  No problem whatsoever....

Even my parents and in-laws now get the severity of the situation.  No more "when are you buying??".

My dad went from a council estate into grammar school > free degree + grant > well paid job and he thinks this is a load of sh*t too, so does my mum. Their siblings went to tech colleges (or not at all) and got well paid careers / jobs too.

By the way just incase, if anyone here is unfamiliar with "council housing", it's this thing we used to have where people affordably rent adequate housing off the council.

A "grammar school" was a school you could go to (for free) if you were clever and a "career" is this deal where you get paid money for working and can work hard to progress your skills and opportunities if you like.

 

WW2

The greatest generation. The metal at the blacksmiths that got hit with the hammer and became tough. Once the war ended aspirational, hard working and wanted better for their children.

"As a rule I don't like suffering to no purpose. Suffering should be creative, should give birth to something good and lovely." CHINUA ACHEBE

Edited by Arpeggio
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I probably shouldn't say this but why are you coming on a public forum to sl*g off your mum - she gave you life?

Won't you (part) inherit her overpriced house one day.

How old was she when the war ended?

Ask debtlessmanc.

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By the way just incase, if anyone here is unfamiliar with "council housing", it's this thing we used to have where people affordably rent adequate housing off the council.

My parents brought theirs through right-to-buy.  

 

My dad went from a council estate into grammar school > free degree + grant > well paid job and he thinks this is a load of sh*t too, so does my mum. Their siblings went to tech colleges (or not at all) and got well paid careers / jobs too.

Good to hear awareness is spreading.  Even if its on this forum.

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i would say some 18 year olds these days have not been through a recession, and have not really felt the head-winds of the economy etc either 

easy to forget that the recession was a good while ago now, and we are all getting painfully old very quickly! 

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i would say some 18 year olds these days have not been through a recession, and have not really felt the head-winds of the economy etc either 

easy to forget that the recession was a good while ago now, and we are all getting painfully old very quickly! 

I suspect you need to be 30 odd to have actually lived in a proper recession and probably 40 odd to actually remember what the 1990s one was like..

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i would say some 18 year olds these days have not been through a recession, and have not really felt the head-winds of the economy etc either 

easy to forget that the recession was a good while ago now, and we are all getting painfully old very quickly! 

The 18 years olds also haven't lived through a boom time either. 

2009 to 2019 was such meh growth it was still a bit depressing. 

1995 to 2005 was a nice period of changing jobs for big pay rises

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The 18 years olds also haven't lived through a boom time either. 

2009 to 2019 was such meh growth it was still a bit depressing. 

1995 to 2005 was a nice period of changing jobs for big pay rises

but at 18yo you also have not had much exposure to the jobs market, or even house prices as at that point its not yet top priority 

also any debt taken out on cars etc have not come to fruition yet

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but at 18yo you also have not had much exposure to the jobs market, or even house prices as at that point its not yet top priority 

True, but it'll surely impact your entry into the job market. But yes they wouldnt know better.

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The greatest generation. The metal at the blacksmiths that got hit with the hammer and became tough. Once the war ended aspirational, hard working and wanted better for their children.

"As a rule I don't like suffering to no purpose. Suffering should be creative, should give birth to something good and lovely." CHINUA ACHEBE

The WW2 generation seem to understand better I think. They seem to be more sympathetic to the problems of today, despite themselves facing far worse problems in their youth. I think they genuinely wanted a better world for their children and grandchildren. Unfortunately anybody who could really remember WW2 is in their mid eighties, and those who actually fought or worked through it are now well into their nineties. 

It's the boomer sorts who like to drone on about how hard they had it. How they had to face the tail-end of rationing as a two year old. How they had to fight their way through Normandy in their dad's left testicle. How they had to scrimp and save for six months to afford the deposit on their suburban houses.

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  • 433 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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