Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Gwynedd second homes 'crisis' prompts 20-miles march


Recommended Posts

 

Gwynedd second homes 'crisis' prompts 20-miles march

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-54316425

But it's fine because the BBC, without fail, refer to this movement in costs as an 'improvement', or even a 'recovery'.

Improvements and recoveries are good things, so there can't be a problem with this can there BBC? You f###ing shower of c###s.

Edited by Huggy
Link to post
Share on other sites

I sympathise with them. I have experienced this in Sussex. Growing up it was a reasonable aspiration for someone with a good job, and a bit of common sense to be able to have a decent detached house by the time they were in their 30s, but because of mass immigration and the vast hordes of Londoner moving down here, it is now out of reach for those who grew up here.

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I sympathise with them. I have experienced this in Sussex. Growing up it was a reasonable aspiration for someone with a good job, and a bit of common sense to be able to have a decent detached house by the time they were in their 30s, but because of mass immigration and the vast hordes of Londoner moving down here, it is now out of reach for those who grew up here.

It's apparently called "progress."

Link to post
Share on other sites

The whole of rural Wales has collapsed, socially - because of tourism largely - the surge of tourism over the last few years. You spend £500,000 on a pretty shitty cottage somewhere remote these days. 

Yet there is no real legislation in place to prevent the speculators moving in - London has the 90 day rule (planning permission if you want to let our a property for more than 90 days) - Ireland has something much tougher than that. 

Wales... nothing - I suspect the middle classes who dominate politics across all the parties there don't want anything impacting their second homes... even Plaid Cymru has done virtually nothing. 

Wales seems to have become a refuge for the super rich too - very low crime generally - easy to avoid the media... I look one way from my house and see the house of some very rich Asians - the other and top London and European legal bods. All safely removed from the troubles of the world. 

Nothing wrong with that - but it's another trend beyond simply mass tourism and the recent "discovery" of Wales. 

Edited by gruffydd
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, HovelinHove said:

I sympathise with them. I have experienced this in Sussex. Growing up it was a reasonable aspiration for someone with a good job, and a bit of common sense to be able to have a decent detached house by the time they were in their 30s, but because of mass immigration and the vast hordes of Londoner moving down here, it is now out of reach for those who grew up here.

I grew up in suburban London and I expected the same life my parents (and their parents before them) enjoyed with respect to housing. 

Unfortunately by the time I was ready to buy a house my hometown turned into the world's favoured money laundering destination so I had to leave and now i'm part of the problem in someone else's hometown. 

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Gwynedd second homes 'crisis' prompts 20-miles march

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-54316425

You would hope that devolution gives the Welsh authorities a bit more teeth than the South West.

I just wonder how many of these second home owners try and integrate into their new communities. How is that even really possible when you don't actually live there. 

Then there's the Welsh language of course which imho you should at least be strongly encouraged to learn if you plan on spending much time there. It's almost treated like a non-country by a lot of English people which is sad as Wales is a great nation with a rich history and culture. 

Edited by spacedin
Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I sympathise with them. I have experienced this in Sussex. Growing up it was a reasonable aspiration for someone with a good job, and a bit of common sense to be able to have a decent detached house by the time they were in their 30s, but because of mass immigration and the vast hordes of Londoner moving down here, it is now out of reach for those who grew up here.

Without mass immigration would london still be a major financial centre?

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

But it's fine because the BBC, without fail, refer to this movement in costs as an 'improvement', or even a 'recovery'.

Improvements and recoveries are good things, so there can't be a problem with this can there BBC? You f###ing shower of c###s.

The BBC's to blame for this?!

Not the shower of c***s you vote for and sing the praises of at every opportunity.

🤣

Btw that's a BBC report. It doesn't mention 'improvement' or 'recovery' anywhere.

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

It's apparently called "progress."

No, it's actually called neoliberalism. Mathematised ideology masquerading as science.

It's central tenet is an unquestioning belief in the free movement of capital, goods and labour.

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Without mass immigration would london still be a major financial centre?

I would prefer it wasn't a major financial center, it has destroyed the well being of millions in the South East. A modestly competent financial center with a lot less immigration would be my preference.

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

The BBC's to blame for this?!

Not the shower of c***s you vote for and sing the praises of at every opportunity.

🤣

Btw that's a BBC report. It doesn't mention 'improvement' or 'recovery' anywhere.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/8304551.stm

😠

The only relevant article I could find specific to Wales was 2009. More recently, or almost 11 years worth of their c##tbaggery later, was here

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-53995878

🤮

Boris ❤️ only has 4 years to persuade me to vote for him again. It's not guaranteed, HPC is the newest most important thing after the 'B' word, and I only ever lend my votes to parties. A nice fat crash will earn him a further vote, HPI, not so much!

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I would prefer it wasn't a major financial center, it has destroyed the well being of millions in the South East. A modestly competent financial center with a lot less immigration would be my preference.

but, what would you put in its place, what work would you do to get money to eat?

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I grew up in suburban London and I expected the same life my parents (and their parents before them) enjoyed with respect to housing. 

Unfortunately by the time I was ready to buy a house my hometown turned into the world's favoured money laundering destination so I had to leave and now i'm part of the problem in someone else's hometown. 

Similar situation but have remained.  We gotta go somewhere I guess.

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

The same I am doing now...nothing to do with financial services, I could do it Scotland, I only live here because of family. 

I was speaking to an elder in the synagogue a few days ago and he thinks we will start to see poverty in the UK by March, let’s see if you change your opinion of things pretty soon

You don’t remember the 1970s do you

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I was speaking to an elder in the synagogue a few days ago and he thinks we will start to see poverty in the UK by March, let’s see if you change your opinion of things pretty soon

You don’t remember the 1970s do you

Yep, they were wonderful years. I was young, my parents had work, We lived in a modest but lovely home, we went on holidays...I remember the power cuts and stuff, but it was fun as a kid. Why are you so eager for me to not be happy and prosperous? It may well be I fall on hard times, but I chose an industry that Is extremely resilient, and my qualifications and experience are highly sought after. Things change, and you can’t always count on everything going perfect, but I have faith in God and he has always looked after me and always will, even if I have less money.

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Yep, they were wonderful years. I was young, my parents had work, We lived in a modest but lovely home, we went on holidays...I remember the power cuts and stuff, but it was fun as a kid. Why are you so eager for me to not be happy and prosperous? It may well be I fall on hard times, but I chose an industry that Is extremely resilient, and my qualifications and experience are highly sought after. Things change, and you can’t always count on everything going perfect, but I have faith in God and he has always looked after me and always will, even if I have less money.

Because you do accept that money is the most important thing in the world 

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Yep, they were wonderful years. I was young, my parents had work, We lived in a modest but lovely home, we went on holidays...I remember the power cuts and stuff, but it was fun as a kid. Why are you so eager for me to not be happy and prosperous? It may well be I fall on hard times, but I chose an industry that Is extremely resilient, and my qualifications and experience are highly sought after. Things change, and you can’t always count on everything going perfect, but I have faith in God and he has always looked after me and always will, even if I have less money.

I have memories from the (late) 70s but I was too young to be aware of anything much other than my immediate situation. With the benefit of hindsight though I'd take the 70s over now, easily. Sure, there was a big economic mess but getting out of them is as inevitable as them happening, and now has precious little going for it even without the whole Covid-19 business. I'd have said the biggest long-term downside back then was the threat of nuclear war, and whilst that situation eventually improved the world's reversing that.

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

I have memories from the (late) 70s but I was too young to be aware of anything much other than my immediate situation. With the benefit of hindsight though I'd take the 70s over now, easily. Sure, there was a big economic mess but getting out of them is as inevitable as them happening, and now has precious little going for it even without the whole Covid-19 business. I'd have said the biggest long-term downside back then was the threat of nuclear war, and whilst that situation eventually improved the world's reversing that.

Things were a lot less complicated. Houses were affordable, as long as you had a reasonable wage, you could have a good life. TV was even good! 

Link to post
Share on other sites
 

Things were a lot less complicated. Houses were affordable, as long as you had a reasonable wage, you could have a good life. TV was even good! 

I like the more complex entertainment possible now but that's about it really. There's not much we've gained in the mean time that I'd miss, and a lot I'd like to see gone (not that it will). Most of the supposed benefits we have now (other than changes in some social attitudes and medical improvements) just come across as, at best, trite and superficial, and most of them are rather dehumanising.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 433 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.