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Anyone noticed an increase in Uk commercial building squatting ?- How Spain Became a Squatter’s Paradise


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How Spain Became a Squatter’s Paradise  

https://wolfstreet.com/2020/09/12/how-spain-became-a-squatters-paradise/

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For many people, squatting is a desperate last resort, while for some it is a lifestyle choice or a political statement. Barcelona, which is ground zero of Spain’s squatting phenomenon, attracts squatters from all over Europe. In recent years, more and more young locals — including many with jobs — who have been priced out of the rental market or who simply don’t want to pay the inflated rents have also turned to squatting.

As a police officer from Barcelona who specializes in evicting okupas told me, removing squatters from properties belonging to private equity funds is a slow, arduous process, due largely to the difficulty of identifying the actual owner of the property — Blackstone, for example, operates in Spain through dozens of different subsidiaries — and then tracking down a representative with whom to liaise. “This takes up a huge part of our day-to-day work,” he says.

2. Juicy money-making opportunities for enterprising criminals. In recent years, enterprising criminal gangs have begun specializing in locating and breaking into vacant apartments. Once they find a place, they quickly change the locks and rig the apartment to the neighbors’ gas, water and electricity supplies. They then “sell” the flat to a squatter, or group of squatters, for between €1,000-€2,000.

In this way, a burgeoning black market has sprouted up. In the Raval neighborhood of Barcelona, the market is controlled by a gang from the Dominican Republic; they charge around €1,500 for each property “sale.” The squatters get to live in a fully serviced apartment without having to pay rent or utilities for a period of around six months. If the flat in question is owned by a fund and the squatters don’t draw undue attention to themselves and the neighbors don’t cotton on to the fact they are effectively subsidizing their utilities consumption, they can often stay a lot longer.

3. Spanish property law tends to protect squatters more than owners, particularly if the property that has been occupied is not a primary residence. If a squatter occupies a person’s primary residence, he or she can be charged with breaking and entering, for which the punishment is usually a prison sentence of between six months and two years. However, thanks to a change of law in 1995, if a squatter usurps a property that is not being used as a main residence, including sometimes second homes, they are likely to be charged with ocupación (squatting), for which the punishment is generally much lighter, ranging from a few-hundred euro fine to a six-month prison sentence.

4. Slow judicial process...

 

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship
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25 minutes ago, shlomo said:

Going back to the UK on this matter regarding residential non payment of rents, we will soon have a major problem, you only have to join a few landlord groups to see how common this is

The big question for me, is whether we will have a situation in the Uk like they did in the US in 2008, where the banks forclosed on the loan , but did not repossess all the houses, sometimes the ex -owners / tenants lived there for 3 yrs + .

So you had the unemployed living under with the stress of being made homeless any day, being like contractless caretakers paid in kind with free rent. 

  

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship
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1 minute ago, Saving For a Space Ship said:

The big question for me, is whether we will have a situation in the Uk like they did in the US in 2008, where the banks forclosed on the laon , but did not repossess many houses, sometimes the ex -owners / tenants lived there for 3 yrs + .

So you had the unemployed living under with the stress of being made homeless any day. 

  

This is unknown territory so tptb are wary, you cannot disenfranchise millions of people without social war 

feeding people beer and footy will only go so far before they realise 

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1 hour ago, shlomo said:

Going back to the UK on this matter regarding residential non payment of rents, we will soon have a major problem, you only have to join a few landlord groups to see how common this is

NRLA did some release, its currently at around 10% non payment. 

Post furlough who knows. Business risk... 

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1 minute ago, captainb said:

NRLA did some release, its currently at around 10% non payment. 

Post furlough who knows. Business risk... 

It’s not coronovirus, it is because to stop eviction for people unable to pay, a large number of people have realised they cannot be evicted even for non payment so large number of people have decided not to pay

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1 minute ago, shlomo said:

It’s not coronovirus, it is because to stop eviction for people unable to pay, a large number of people have realised they cannot be evicted even for non payment so large number of people have decided not to pay

Yep get all that. Current figure is ~90% paying 10% not. From the landlords association so would be more inclined to say.. Its awful quick change the law and give us cash. 

At some point you can be evicted also the debt doesn't disappear. 

Not sure vast numbers of people want a CCJ against their name if they can pay... Its not a good thing to have. 

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Just now, captainb said:

Yep get all that. Current figure is ~90% paying 10% not. From the landlords association so would be more inclined to say.. Its awful quick change the law and give us cash. 

At some point you can be evicted also the debt doesn't disappear. 

Not sure vast numbers of people want a CCJ against their name if they can pay... Its not a good thing to have. 

When is this data from, anecdotal data I have is a much larger than 10% nonpayment 

I have a friend with 14/16 properties and only 2 are paying 

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2 minutes ago, shlomo said:

When is this data from, anecdotal data I have is a much larger than 10% nonpayment 

I have a friend with 14/16 properties and only 2 are paying 

You guv poll for NRLA. Think we have had this conversation before. If that is your friend's actual situation he's the most unlucky one going. 

78% paid in full, 19% half paid and 3% losing more than half. 

So total payment 

78+10+1.5 =~90% payment rate overall. 

Quote from press release below. They are pushing for landlord relief so want to state worst possible hardship 

"Almost a quarter (22 per cent) of private landlords with properties in England surveyed have lost rental income as a result of COVID-19 according to new polling.

The research, conducted online by YouGov for the National Residential Landlords Association, found that whilst 19 per cent of those questioned had lost up to half of their usual rental income as a result of COVID-19, three per cent had lost more than half."

 

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15 minutes ago, shlomo said:

We have a lot of accidental landlords and people with a couple of properties where the percentage is much higher

i cannot give you any more information on my friend as he has stopped talking to me.

Will of course be cases and prob a much larger % around an airport. 

Would suggest looking at overall surveys is key. 

A landlord not getting paid will cry to anyone that will listen and shout to the Internet all day. 

The 9 getting paid on the same road will be silent in the background 

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10% is quite a significant amount when furlough is only just starting to wind down. The people on furlough are most likely to be in jobs that see them renting. I can see a significant rise where people can no longer afford to pay or even for those who realise they can't be evicted for many months. A CCJ doesn't worry people living hand to mouth. They're unlikely to want to make a large financial purchase for a house, car which a CCJ would be considered. 

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4 minutes ago, fatspanner said:

10% is quite a significant amount when furlough is only just starting to wind down. The people on furlough are most likely to be in jobs that see them renting. I can see a significant rise where people can no longer afford to pay or even for those who realise they can't be evicted for many months. A CCJ doesn't worry people living hand to mouth. They're unlikely to want to make a large financial purchase for a house, car which a CCJ would be considered. 

If enough people get ccj they will not have a worth, they will have to be disregarded for all purposes 

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7 hours ago, shlomo said:

UK landlords forum, but they all reporting the same thing, so many wished they had never got into BTL

Look at this landlord

Daniella Fonodi 

Have they realised when house prices are falling they're losing equity on multiple properties 😭

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  • 417 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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