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HOUSEBUILDING SLOW-DOWN COULD LEAVE COMMUNITIES WITHOUT SAY OVER NEW DEVELOPMENTS, COUNCILS WARN


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HOUSEBUILDING SLOW-DOWN COULD LEAVE COMMUNITIES WITHOUT SAY OVER NEW DEVELOPMENTS, COUNCILS WARN

https://districtcouncils.info/press-releases/housebuilding-slow-down-could-leave-communities-without-say-over-new-developments-councils-warn/

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A slow-down in house-building due to the coronavirus crisis could see councils unfairly penalised, and communities denied a say in new developments under current planning rules, a new survey by the District Councils’ Network warns today.

With construction on new homes almost coming to a stand-still in the recent months, many councils fear, through no fault of their own, that they may fall short of meeting their housing targets, meaning local plans designating where development can take place and agreed by local residents can be ignored by developers.

This is despite council planning departments continuing to work and approve housing schemes during the lockdown.

The DCN, which represents 187 district councils in England with responsibility for planning and housebuilding, is warning that this risks opening the door to speculative developments taking place beyond the control and oversight of local communities.

Ahead of the expected publication of proposed planning reforms this week, it is calling on the Government to take a pragmatic approach to support councils, and amend existing planning guidelines.

This comes as the DCN’s new survey found that over half (57 per cent) of respondents were very concerned about the impact of coronavirus on being able to sustain a supply of land for housing over the next five years – known as the five-year land supply.

As a result of not having a land supply, local planning policies will not apply and areas could see developments which are refused following for example, objections from local residents, able to proceed on appeal.

Nearly two-thirds (62 per cent) of responding councils also fear they would not meet the Government’s housing delivery test, which sets targets on house building in local areas.

This would mean new developments would be subject to nationally-defined planning policies as opposed to local plans agreed by local communities.

The DCN is calling for the current planning guidelines to be changed to take account of the house-building slow-down caused by coronavirus, so councils are not unfairly penalised.

This should include a suspension of the five-year land supply and housing delivery test requirements.....

 

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build where you like apart from greenfield not directly next to existing houses.

BUT

those houses should be built to size and quality standards of the 1930’s (plus modern insulation and technology)

what the country needs is a lot more houses but stop cramming thousands of shite new builds on a a postage stamp of land.

im not saying that everyone should have or even deserves a large 3 bed house, but those who work should have a good quality of life, AND society would be a lot nicer if we didn’t have half the population ‘underhoused’ or crammed in crap new build estates and all the rage that is instilled into the populace from housing stress and lack of habitat

most housing built since the 50’s is a crime. 

the new builds estates are slums of the future

I think Prince Charles is actually onto something with building british style new towns. lovely human places to be.

we have enough history to know what works and looks good, which has the look of Englishness, the whole glass and steel of the 2000’s scream cheap shite. 

imagine what our grandchildren will think looking at new build estate or chavy grand designs modern type houses?

 

Edited by jiltedjen
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4 hours ago, jiltedjen said:

 

those houses should be built to size and quality standards of the 1930’s (plus modern insulation and technology)

 

 

The problem is it's the council and planning permission that are forcing the current building layouts.

In my last new build I bought (which I was very happy with) they didn't have enough parking for the 2-3 car families. The developer wanted to build a lay-by the length of the road (the estate was only on one side of the road, with a park the other), so parking could have been both sides of the road. Planning permission was declined as there was too much parking.

And funnily enough, my second new-build house (where I live now) has so called 'poor' access - i.e. through an older estate. This meant the density of houses was limited, and is half the number of the guidelines. The result is the gardens are very large compared to other new builds, and comes with a double garage (6mtr x 6.3mtr) and drive way for four cars (parked tandem, at a push admittedly).

 

 

 

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6 hours ago, jiltedjen said:

build where you like apart from greenfield not directly next to existing houses.

BUT

those houses should be built to size and quality standards of the 1930’s (plus modern insulation and technology)

what the country needs is a lot more houses but stop cramming thousands of shite new builds on a a postage stamp of land.

The last thing it needs is a lot more houses, or at best it should be recognised that it is very definitely a necessary evil at best and every effort should be made to stop needing to carry on the damage.

Whether or not next to existing homes is too bad a thing or not very much depends upon the specific location.

Agree with much better building standards (but without a lot of the nonsense - they're needed on the basics). Technology's something you put in a house if you want it though, it's not part of the house itself. Not sure the 30s is a good benchmark though. Well, it was good in terms of size (probably the best it has been) but they tend to be pretty ugly things. Go with modern insulation, 30s size, and Georgian and Victorian aesthetics (at least at the better end of that era) if you can't come up with anything better (most attempts, mass attempts at least, have all failed to do so, you occasionally get the individual decent one). Start building less depressing crap spat-out-of-a-machine plonked-there looking developments and there'll probably be rather less objection to them.

Edited by Riedquat
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  • 417 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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