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Bricklaying Robot Hailed As Future Of Construction


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Looks like the Brickie may lose their job to automation....

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A brick-laying robot named Hadrian X has broken its own record for speed, which is now up to 200 concrete blocks per hour—with the next landmark set at 240. (Its sibling robot Hadrian 112 aims to reach 1,000.)

The robot works by using sensors and what Fastbrick calls Dynamic Stabilisation Technology (DST) to adjust for “wind, vibration and other environmental factors instantly, enabling precise positioning of objects over large distances outside,” the Australian firm says on its site.

The robot's onboard computer has an entire 3D CAD rendering of the planned building, and the DST system helps it stay lined up and on task. In the video, it lays pristine, solid, concrete bricks in a dry situation, but Hadrian X can mortar as well.

This content is imported from YouTube. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

“When you consider that manual brick and block laying costs globally vary anywhere from AUD10 (US$6.90) per square meter to AUD100 (US$69) per square meter, we are already cost competitive across a broad range of the market at 200 blocks per hour,” Fastbrick Robotics CEO Mike Pivac said in a statement.

That’s before any labor shortage is taken into account—cost is irrelevant if you can’t persuade people to train for the gig. (In the U.S., numbers of construction workers have fallen since the 1960s, with a precipitous drop after the 2008 recession and yet-unknown ramifications from the COVID-19 recession.

https://www.popularmechanics.com/technology/robots/a32772384/bricklaying-robot-record-video/

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I have been saying for years the technological advances of the 20s and then the 30s will stop millions of jobs, professional ones too. The techies and economists always come out with but we’ve always found other jobs. Not this time. #Elysium

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44 minutes ago, Killer Bunny said:

I have been saying for years the technological advances of the 20s and then the 30s will stop millions of jobs, professional ones too. The techies and economists always come out with but we’ve always found other jobs. Not this time. #Elysium

The big one will be driving autonomy, big because of the number of jobs affected, huge because the penny will drop.

We are pretty much at a solid level 3 autonomy right now, with some venturing into 4 in prototypes. Obviously not all cars have it, but it is possible.

5 is hard, but much easier if you have a near complete set of level 4s on the road to interact with. I don't see this happening before the end of the decade but would not bet against it at this point.

Remember, it only has to be statistically safer than people at performing the task, that's the fulcrum.

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There will be driverless vehicles in UK within 5 years. I expect it to be widespread in deliveries by 2030. 100s of 000s of drivers.

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1 hour ago, Killer Bunny said:

There will be driverless vehicles in UK within 5 years. I expect it to be widespread in deliveries by 2030. 100s of 000s of drivers.

If you took humans off the road now you could probably have driverless cars now. The issues for driverless cars is knowing how humans will behave. Roads don’t change overnight, humans do things in seconds!

Read somewhere recently that once we have driverless cars, it probably won’t be long for driverless flying vehicles because there’s less things in the air to get in the way.

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There wasn't a video in warlords post for me, viewing on a mobile device, but here's a YouTube link to the same system. 

These have been posted before, but the are getting better, it does seem to need a lot of preparation and I suppose you've still got to deal with sparkies, roofers and, shudder, pipe fitters

One day we'll have modular houses whee you and I can easily add an extra electricy circuit, or replace/improve the plumbing without needing a professional to do it. Then you could get the robot to build the house, and fit out the other parts yourself. 

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Another really pointless development, cheered on no doubt by the usual fools. All very impressive, but pointless at best when it's doing something humans can do perfectly well and we're not facing a lack of people to do jobs (although we do have a lack of bothering to make the effort for things like training). Anyone who thinks this sort of technology actually improves lives is utterly deluded.

 

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3 hours ago, Killer Bunny said:

I have been saying for years the technological advances of the 20s and then the 30s will stop millions of jobs, professional ones too. The techies and economists always come out with but we’ve always found other jobs. Not this time. #Elysium

What’s different this time?

The fact is that if a robot now does  your old job you now have 40 hours a week in which you can do something else - the idea that we just ‘run out’ of things to do only applies if you think human beings will suddenly say ‘I have enough now thanks, and don’t want anything more even if it’s free’ which they never do. 

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15 minutes ago, regprentice said:

There wasn't a video in warlords post for me, viewing on a mobile device, but here's a YouTube link to the same system. 

 

Sensational.  Yet again technology showing what can be done more efficiently and likely to a higher standard than 'the traditional way'.

Technology always improves and gets rid of people.  That is of course the efficiency. It is proven that the more technological the more general prosperity...if the nation takes advantage.  THAT is the problem.

When pick your own grocers started popping up most businesses said it was a fad...

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9 minutes ago, scottbeard said:

The fact is that if a robot now does  your old job you now have 40 hours a week in which you can do something else

With what money?

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30 minutes ago, scottbeard said:

What’s different this time?

The fact is that if a robot now does  your old job you now have 40 hours a week in which you can do something else - the idea that we just ‘run out’ of things to do only applies if you think human beings will suddenly say ‘I have enough now thanks, and don’t want anything more even if it’s free’ which they never do. 

We've not really had all that long of the sort of developments that do that, just since the Industrial Revolution really (a few earlier ones but not enough to have a massive impact). At the time of the Industrial Revoluion everyone (well everyone not wealthy, which was almost everyone) was having to work flat out all the time just to produce enough to get by, if they were lucky. Most of the time since then further technological developments have been working away at that grind, so there was certainly still plenty to do with the time freed up. That only really changed a few decades ago (in developed countries at last). Society really hasn't come to terms with the idea of "enough", when wanting more was a strong driver that evolved just to make sure that we had a chance at getting the essentials.

So a level of luxuries is good, but at what point does it simply become a pointless, wasteful urge that can't ever be satisfied anyway? Meanwhile you've succeeded in making a large proportion of the population essentially useless - people whose ideal jobs are the ones that get automated end up with more and more meaningless lives.

How many people if given the time and opportunity will sit in front of the TV all day surrounded by fast food containers?

You might eventually end up with the same jobs being done as hobbies, and then (hopefully) people will realise that if people are wanting to do them anyway the machines are a waste of time. Just keep a few of them around so you don't have to work as many hours as we do nowdays, or for the jobs no-one wants to do.

Edited by Riedquat
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I can see a world where house builders just prepare plots, organise the roads, pavements and electric/gas/broadband provision on a site the you then you have a 'empty canvas' plot to play with.

You get an app that let's you design a house, it knows what is and isn't structurally viable and has been loaded with your local councils planning regs. Once complete your plan gets checked by the app, sent to the planning dept for an automated review, then you are ready to go. 

Along with your plot the house builder gives you the use if a house building robot for 1 day, you upload your design from your app and stand for a few hours watching your dream house being built from scratch. Once in a lifetime experience 

Ive just put builders, architects, council planning staff and probably tens of other jobs out of business. There may be new jobs, such as a filming a personalised drone video of your house build to keep for posterity. 

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43 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

Another really pointless development, cheered on no doubt by the usual fools. All very impressive, but pointless at best when it's doing something humans can do perfectly well and we're not facing a lack of people to do jobs (although we do have a lack of bothering to make the effort for things like training). Anyone who thinks this sort of technology actually improves lives is utterly deluded.

 

The old bricklayers will become the new brick throwers.

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2 hours ago, Killer Bunny said:

With what money?

Erm - the money they earn from their new job.  If I don't have to work 40 hours as a Blacksmith, I work 40 hours as a car mechanic.  If I don't have to work 40 hours as a car mechanic, I work 40 hours writing software etc etc.  There never comes a point when people go "actually that's it, there's enough things in the world now, you can all stop working."

2 hours ago, Riedquat said:

So a level of luxuries is good, but at what point does it simply become a pointless, wasteful urge that can't ever be satisfied anyway? Meanwhile you've succeeded in making a large proportion of the population essentially useless - people whose ideal jobs are the ones that get automated end up with more and more meaningless lives.

It's interesting though isn't it that even though things CAN be automated, people still do them manually out of choice.

For example, it's now possible to make bread and cakes for fantastically low effort compared to most of human history.  But yet the market for luxury cupcakes and artisan bread is booming.  In fact, it's precisely because essentials are now so cheap that many people in the UK have the money to splash out on artisan bread, instead of just struggling to get the bare minimum of calories into their bodies.

So if your passion is baking, and you don't want to simply work on a bread assembly line, you can still be an artisan baker.

I don't see the ultimate destination of automation being one where we are all "plugged into the Matrix".

But you and I have this discussion about once every 3 months and we just don't see eye to eye on it ;):) 

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3 hours ago, Riedquat said:

Another really pointless development, cheered on no doubt by the usual fools. All very impressive, but pointless at best when it's doing something humans can do perfectly well and we're not facing a lack of people to do jobs (although we do have a lack of bothering to make the effort for things like training). Anyone who thinks this sort of technology actually improves lives is utterly deluded.

 

Bricks are a compromise.

I remember reading a book about a bloke having a barn rebuilt as a house in the 1930s. One chapter was a discussion about getting brickies rather than stone masons- plently more brickies, being loads cheaper/less skilled,  and walls are built faster.

I'd guess the operating costs of the robot are massive - break downs, setup costs etc etc.

Besides, these are large concrete blocks rather than small bricks.

And its Oz.

 

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8 minutes ago, scottbeard said:

Erm - the money they earn from their new job.  If I don't have to work 40 hours as a Blacksmith, I work 40 hours as a car mechanic.  If I don't have to work 40 hours as a car mechanic, I work 40 hours writing software etc etc.  There never comes a point when people go "actually that's it, there's enough things in the world now, you can all stop working."

It's interesting though isn't it that even though things CAN be automated, people still do them manually out of choice.

For example, it's now possible to make bread and cakes for fantastically low effort compared to most of human history.  But yet the market for luxury cupcakes and artisan bread is booming.  In fact, it's precisely because essentials are now so cheap that many people in the UK have the money to splash out on artisan bread, instead of just struggling to get the bare minimum of calories into their bodies.

So if your passion is baking, and you don't want to simply work on a bread assembly line, you can still be an artisan baker.

I don't see the ultimate destination of automation being one where we are all "plugged into the Matrix".

But you and I have this discussion about once every 3 months and we just don't see eye to eye on it ;):) 

Afaict market for OTT priced 'artisan'  cupcakes is long gone.

Posh bread market is still there.

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33 minutes ago, scottbeard said:

Erm - the money they earn from their new job.  If I don't have to work 40 hours as a Blacksmith, I work 40 hours as a car mechanic.  If I don't have to work 40 hours as a car mechanic, I work 40 hours writing software etc etc.  There never comes a point when people go "actually that's it, there's enough things in the world now, you can all stop working."

 

apart from the fact the blacksmith would need 3 years training and 3 years work experience to get paid the same as the blacksmith he was in the first place as a car mechanic. And same for the software developer of course no one will train them anyway so they would need to pay for that too hopefully they have saved up enough cash to pay for the difference in HPI while all this is going on if they never bought a house when they were a blacksmith. 

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3 hours ago, regprentice said:

There wasn't a video in warlords post for me, viewing on a mobile device, but here's a YouTube link to the same system. 

These have been posted before, but the are getting better, it does seem to need a lot of preparation and I suppose you've still got to deal with sparkies, roofers and, shudder, pipe fitters

One day we'll have modular houses whee you and I can easily add an extra electricy circuit, or replace/improve the plumbing without needing a professional to do it. Then you could get the robot to build the house, and fit out the other parts yourself. 

might work for lego new builds not much use in refurbs and building extensions and garden walls on existing plots, time you set it up it would be cheaper and quicker for a conventional brickie even with tea breaks to get it done. 

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4 hours ago, Riedquat said:

Another really pointless development, cheered on no doubt by the usual fools. All very impressive, but pointless at best when it's doing something humans can do perfectly well and we're not facing a lack of people to do jobs (although we do have a lack of bothering to make the effort for things like training). Anyone who thinks this sort of technology actually improves lives is utterly deluded.

 

I hope they automate all of these Trades to be honest. I'm sick of Tradespeople, including Brickies, not turning up for a job, or turning up late with no explanation either way, (inconveniencing me & burning my Annual Leave in the process) then proceeding to saunter around like they own the place while having a smug, "you need me more than I need you" look plastered all over their face. About time they had a wake up call. You're not a God, you're not irreplacable & no, I don't need you more than you need me.

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1 hour ago, longgone said:

apart from the fact the blacksmith would need 3 years training and 3 years work experience to get paid the same as the blacksmith he was in the first place as a car mechanic. And same for the software developer of course no one will train them anyway so they would need to pay for that too hopefully they have saved up enough cash to pay for the difference in HPI while all this is going on if they never bought a house when they were a blacksmith. 

That’s transitional not structural 

In reality what happens is some mechanics end up taking early retirement, school leavers then decide to go into IT not mechanics etc

But the point is in the long run automation never causes us to “run out of work” with millions idle the way that some posters think it does 

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6 hours ago, scb said:

If you took humans off the road now you could probably have driverless cars now.

I can see us having an epidemic of bad driving where people will pull out in front of, or cut up, autonomous vehicles knowing they are programmed to react and get out of the way in microseconds.

Only once in a while they might meet a human driver.

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5 hours ago, regprentice said:

I can see a world where house builders just prepare plots, organise the roads, pavements and electric/gas/broadband provision on a site the you then you have a 'empty canvas' plot to play with.

You get an app that let's you design a house, it knows what is and isn't structurally viable and has been loaded with your local councils planning regs. Once complete your plan gets checked by the app, sent to the planning dept for an automated review, then you are ready to go. 

Along with your plot the house builder gives you the use if a house building robot for 1 day, you upload your design from your app and stand for a few hours watching your dream house being built from scratch. Once in a lifetime experience

I think its more likely that we will get standardised Pre-Fab buildings that arrive on the back of a lorry. If they are 10% cheaper than the alternatives then that's what most people will choose.

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