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Tenant eviction ban extended in UK by two months


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10 minutes ago, Now or never said:

Seems like everything is about buying time.

Time is becoming very expensive in the current climate.

The events that gets swept up into this delay, which would have happened organically over a wider period of time, will all happen at the same time now as govt will pull the ladder out from under tenants, workers on furlough etc all in the same month. 

Certainly autumn into winter doesn't feel like the right time for us to be taking the training wheels off.   

Had things run their course it would have been much more like the V shaped drop they are looking for, some things dropping, some increasing. I've no Idea how genuine they are but look at trumps employment numbers, he's already had his job losses and the 'snap back' to being in business.... I'm not expecting to be back at work this side of Christmas! 

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16 hours ago, regprentice said:

The events that gets swept up into this delay, which would have happened organically over a wider period of time, will all happen at the same time now as govt will pull the ladder out from under tenants, workers on furlough etc all in the same month. 

Certainly autumn into winter doesn't feel like the right time for us to be taking the training wheels off.   

Had things run their course it would have been much more like the V shaped drop they are looking for, some things dropping, some increasing. I've no Idea how genuine they are but look at trumps employment numbers, he's already had his job losses and the 'snap back' to being in business.... I'm not expecting to be back at work this side of Christmas! 

The US took a huge unemployment hit, nearly 20% were unemployed last month, you only needed a few stores and other businesses to open back up for employment to rise. It will be a miracle if it is less than 8%, the same as the 2008 crisis, by Christmas.

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17 hours ago, Now or never said:

Seems like everything is about buying time.

Time is becoming very expensive in the current climate.

Extend and pretend.

"The winter of discontent 2"; the first was bad enough but the second will be global (well in the northern hemisphere any how).

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On 05/06/2020 at 22:52, regprentice said:

The events that gets swept up into this delay, which would have happened organically over a wider period of time, will all happen at the same time now as govt will pull the ladder out from under tenants, workers on furlough etc all in the same month. 

May be they’ll redeploy all the contact tracers who remain idle as bailiffs.

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14 minutes ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

May be they’ll redeploy all the contact tracers who remain idle as bailiffs.

Sounds like a bad sitcom... As I understand most contact tracers are a 'work from home' opportunity being done by single mums, sitting in front of 10 year old laptops in their dressing gowns watching Jeremy Kyle out of the corner of their eye while taking your notes.

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7 minutes ago, regprentice said:

Sounds like a bad sitcom... As I understand most contact tracers are a 'work from home' opportunity being done by single mums, sitting in front of 10 year old laptops in their dressing gowns watching Jeremy Kyle out of the corner of their eye while taking your notes.

So working as bailiffs they could literally expel someone from the Zoom call they are on!

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  • 5 weeks later...
Posted (edited)

Almost a quarter of a million renters at risk of eviction when ban lifts, says Shelter

06/07/20

https://www.insidehousing.co.uk/news/news/almost-a-quarter-of-a-million-renters-at-risk-of-eviction-when-ban-lifts-says-shelter-67059

Quote

More than 225,000 private renters are at risk of being evicted due to rent arrears when possession proceedings resume in the courts next month, new research by Shelter has found.

More than 225,000 private renters are at risk of being evicted due to rent arrears when possession proceedings resume in the courts next month, new research by Shelter has found 

A poll carried out by YouGov on behalf of the homelessness charity found that an estimated 227,000 adult private renters (3%) have fallen into arrears since the coronavirus lockdown began.

According to the survey, this puts the total number of private renters in arrears at 442,000 (5%), which is double what it was in the same period last year.

The poll was based on the responses of 1,058 private renters in England, estimates were then calculated based on the total number of private renters in the UK.

It comes days after the government confirmed that it would not be extending the COVID-19 ban on evictions past the 23 August deadline.

Under the current legal system, if a tenants has accrued at least eight weeks of arrears during the crisis, they can be automatically evicted using Ground 8 of Section 8 when the ban lifts.

All tenants on assured shorthold tenancies are at risk of eviction if the fixed-term tenancy period in their contract has ended.

Government confirms evictions will resume next month

Homelessness could treble without ‘coronavirus home retention scheme’, campaigners tell government

Legislative changes needed to ensure homelessness does not rise during pandemic, says Crisis

Shelter’s poll found that roughly 174,000 private tenants have already been threatened with eviction by their landlord or letting agent during the COVID-19 crisis.

The research also revealed the impact the threat of eviction has had on the mental of health of some renters, as nearly a third of respondents said they felt depressed or anxious about their housing situation.

The government has previously said it is considering introducing a ‘pre-action protocol’ that would require landlords to negotiate with tenants before beginning court proceedings against them.

However, Shelter has argued that such a move would be meaningless unless legislative changes are introduced to give judges more power when deciding whether to grant an eviction.

The charity is calling on the government to amend Section 21 so that judges are not forced to automatically grant possession orders to temporarily disapply Ground 8.

It is urging the government to introduce these changes before parliament enters summer recess in 10 sitting days, as MPs will not return until after the ban is lifted.

These demands have been broadly echoed by much of the housing sector – including the Chartered Institute of Housing, Crisis and the Law Centres Network – due to fears that the current system will lead to a spike in homelessness when the ban is lifted.

Polly Neate, chief executive of Shelter, said: “The housing secretary promised that no one would lose their home because of coronavirus. But the financial chaos of COVID-19 means that many private renters are in danger of being evicted when the current ban lifts. Unless he acts now, he will break his promise and put thousands of renters at risk of homelessness.

“We know people have been doing whatever they can to pay their rent and keep their home safe. Despite this, the minute the evictions ban lifts, the 230,000 already behind with their rent could be up for automatic eviction if they’ve built up eight weeks worth of arrears. And judges will be powerless to help them. That’s more than the entire population of Portsmouth at risk of losing their homes. And let’s not forget: this pandemic is not over.

“The Housing secretary can still avert this disaster. He can prevent these ‘COVID evictions’ as the pandemic continues and keep families safe in their homes. All he and the government need to do – in the 10 sitting days before parliament breaks for the summer – is make some small changes to the law. These changes would give judges the power to ensure that no renter is automatically evicted and that the impact of coronavirus is always considered.”

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government has been approached for comment.

An MHCLG spokesperson said: “The government has taken unprecedented action to support renters during the pandemic and prevent people from getting into financial hardship. We have introduced the furlough scheme to protect jobs, provided over £6.5 billion to strengthen the welfare safety-net, and introduced higher Local Housing Allowance rates to cover the lowest 30% of market rents.

“We have also provided protections to renters that have meant no-one has been forced from their home as a result of the pandemic. We’re working with the judiciary to provide appropriate protection to those who have been particularly affected by coronavirus when proceedings start again.”

 

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship
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I'm guessing HB/UC will cover people's rent but it takes time to come through . 

I wonder what the price tag is going to be with potentially millions signing up to UC and HB.

 

 

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On 6/6/2020 at 1:08 AM, MonsieurCopperCrutch said:

This is welcome news for those renters on here and just confirms that all that irrational ire over mortgage holidays (when you could always get a mortage holiday anyway) was badly misplaced and ill-judged. 

OMG heresy on this site !

Was not misplaced or ill judged just and spiteful

On 6/8/2020 at 7:01 AM, regprentice said:

As I understand most contact tracers are a 'work from home' opportunity being done by single mums, sitting in front of 10 year old laptops in their dressing gowns watching Jeremy Kyle out of the corner of their eye while taking your notes.

Do you have any evidence for that 

 

 

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3 hours ago, richmondtw said:

Do you have any evidence for that 

This page on the NHS website states a fairly high clinical experience bar to be considered as a contact tracer, and confirms they work from home. 

According to this article there are two types of tracers, junior and senior. The senior, supervisor type, roles are 'clinical contact tracers' as per the NHS advert in the previous paragraph, the junior roles have a lower bar to entry and in order to meet the target of tens of thousands, appear to be largely general call centre staff as per the BBC article here

Certainly in the early days they were being paid to sit at home and do nothing as described herehere and here 

My observations about wearing pyjamas, watching their kids and watching Jeremy Kyle were more anecdotal but I'm working from home and that's what I'm doing sometimes. Anecdotally most people have at least some days like that. 

Edited by regprentice
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  • 1 month later...

The million $$ question is what is he plan if there is no more money ? 

The taxpayer cannot fund it as it so skint, and any available money will be needed for other things ie food & heat in winter  

Evictions ban: where to now?

https://www.insidehousing.co.uk/comment/comment/evictions-ban-where-to-now-67630

Quote

 

Evictions ban: where to now?

26/08/20 by Ligia Teixeira

The ban on possession proceedings in England and Wales has been extended until 20 September. It is important to use the next four weeks wisely to stop evictions leading to a rise in homelessness, explains Dr Ligia Teixeira

Dr Ligia Teixeira is chief executive at the Centre for Homelessness Impact
 

A total of 18,000 households in England have become legally homeless during the pandemic (picture: Getty)

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It is important to use the next four weeks wisely to stop evictions leading to a rise in homelessness, explains 

Evictions have been suspended since the beginning of lockdown, and on Friday the government announced it would extend the ban until 20 September in an “11th-hour U-turn”.

The extension is a welcome development and shows the government followed the data. In the absence of a clear, evidence-informed plan that addresses the root causes, and that targets efforts and resources effectively at those most vulnerable to homelessness – such as those living in poverty or fleeing domestic violence – it would have been unwise to stop the ban.

But there is no denying the fact that by extending it by just four weeks, the government has set itself a very tough challenge.

The question of how many people are likely to be affected when the eviction ban ends is hotly contested. Yet we do know for a fact that at least 18,000 households across England have become legally homeless during the pandemic despite the nationwide ban on evictions, according to a report in the New Statesman based on Freedom Of Information Act requests. Those numbers include evicted tenants and lodgers, as well as people in short-term accommodation, rough sleepers and victims of domestic abuse.

So it will be very important to use the next four weeks wisely.

As a what works centre that is politically neutral and whose only concern is to ensure we do the most good possible with resources available, we stand ready to help the government and others in the homelessness system, to make sure that by 20 September, a sound plan is in place.

Current evidence suggests that an evidence-informed plan needs to do three things:

Improve how the private rented sector works for people at the bottom of the market. This will require legislation and must be prioritised.

Let’s not delay fulfilling the Conservative Party’s manifesto commitment to abolish no-fault evictions – or legislate, so that judges have greater discretion. It is also right that the most egregious cases, for example those involving anti-social behaviour or domestic abuse perpetrators, begin to be heard in court again.

And let’s not forget that landlord behaviour – in the form of assured shorthold tenancies – continues to be a leading driver of statutory homelessness in London and the South East, through the ending of assured shorthold tenancies (60,000 cases in 2019).

Experiments such as the ones we’re currently undertaking with The Behavioural Insights Team and the National Residential Landlords Association can help to work out what works to foster effective landlord/tenant relationships.

Fix the wider housing market. The changes to England’s planning system could be a real opportunity if implemented well. This will require dedicated investment on the creation of genuinely affordable homes in the right places. And greater experimentation at local level could also help target limited resources more effectively while improving outcomes.

For instance, evidence shows that most people affected by homelessness not only don’t need an emergency housing stay, but that no intervention at all may be better than traditional crisis accommodation. Our analysis also suggests that replacing just 5% of current NPPMA/B&B use in London – eg by moving people to other accommodation types – could generate a net saving of just under £50m over a five-year timescale.

And if we’re serious about acting on rigorous evidence and ending homelessness for good, financial support must be available to those who need it – both tenants or landlords. We also need to experiment to ensure we find out what works for different groups, and acknowledge those in disadvantaged areas may need more support than your average renter or landlord. And housing benefits for private renters in areas such as London and the South East may need a boost, while access to emergency financial support and legal aid must be straightforward.

Both tenants and landlords would probably also benefit from an extension of the government furlough scheme, which is due to end in October. Our forthcoming policy paper on employment will include lots of tips on the types of interventions that work in this space.

So, a month doesn’t seem like a very long time, but ultimately quality is more important than quantity.

By the time the ban does end, we would like to see a robust, data-driven action plan for when the ban does lift that is ready to be implemented and evaluated. The priority needs to be to improve the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the system in the longer term.

Dr Ligia Teixeira, chief executive, Centre for Homelessness Impact

 

 

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I’ve joined a Facebook Landlord group, just for the lolz. It’s an absolute car crash over there, so bad in fact even our old friend Dr  Ros has been chipping in pearls of wisdom. I get the feeling a lot of these amateur BTLers haven’t got the capital to last much longer.

 

Hi

I wonder if any one has any views on this, I had a tenant who stopped paying in Dec 2019 got a section22 and got the court order on March 22nd 2020. The eviction by baliffs   has been postponed and was postponed for another month last week due to Covid 19. Apart from an illegal action as I have the court order is there anything else i can do? (i have CCj against him) He owes me £8000

 

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2 minutes ago, Odysseus said:

I’ve joined a Facebook Landlord group, just for the lolz. It’s an absolute car crash over there, so bad in fact even our old friend Dr  Ros has been chipping in pearls of wisdom. I get the feeling a lot of these amateur BTLers haven’t got the capital to last much longer.

 

Hi

I wonder if any one has any views on this, I had a tenant who stopped paying in Dec 2019 got a section22 and got the court order on March 22nd 2020. The eviction by baliffs   has been postponed and was postponed for another month last week due to Covid 19. Apart from an illegal action as I have the court order is there anything else i can do? (i have CCj against him) He owes me £8000

 

Link to the group, sounds like fun 

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26 minutes ago, shlomo said:

Link to the group, sounds like fun 

Just search UK Landlords Support Group and answer their questions for entry.

___________________________

Can tenants be evicted yet?? Been trying to get ours out for over a year. Section 21’s twice and now the agency are saying they can’t even do an inspection til October. This has stopped us from buying a new house as needed to sell it for the deposit. Never ever again will we ever rent.

 

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  • 417 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
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      • up 5%



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