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I told you.


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1 hour ago, Dreamcasting said:

The best days for the UK are well over and have been since the late 90s. This is the case for the entire west also. People these days aren't kind and considerate. Culture these days is not pleasant, and most people are just slaves with very little to live for.

100% agree with this.  The 1990's were the last hurrah before the lights went out. 

I was 21 when I voted for Blair in 1997.  Little did we know back then that nulabour would destroy the fooking country.

I've hated the 2000's so far.  It's been a sh1tty 20 years.

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10 minutes ago, Social Justice League said:

100% agree with this.  The 1990's were the last hurrah before the lights went out. 

I was 21 when I voted for Blair in 1997.  Little did we know back then that nulabour would destroy the fooking country.

I've hated the 2000's so far.  It's been a sh1tty 20 years.

It's been naff. I'm still waiting for my jetpack.

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9 minutes ago, Social Justice League said:

100% agree with this.  The 1990's were the last hurrah before the lights went out. 

I was 21 when I voted for Blair in 1997.  Little did we know back then that nulabour would destroy the fooking country.

I've hated the 2000's so far.  It's been a sh1tty 20 years.

I'm 3 years behind you, being 18 in 1997. And I wholeheartedly share your sentiment. For me, something that I couldn't quite put my finger on went spectacularly wrong around 2004, and seemed never to recover. 

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15 minutes ago, Orb said:

I'm 3 years behind you, being 18 in 1997. And I wholeheartedly share your sentiment. For me, something that I couldn't quite put my finger on went spectacularly wrong around 2004, and seemed never to recover. 

House Price inflation kicked in properly in the early 2000's and it has destroyed the country imo. 

Obsession with property has destroyed peoples minds and society in general.  We are about to pay the price for 20 years of this bloody rubbish and I think it's going to be a high price for the millions who bought into this trainwreck of a property market.

It's time to pay the piper.

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27 minutes ago, Orb said:

I'm 3 years behind you, being 18 in 1997. And I wholeheartedly share your sentiment. For me, something that I couldn't quite put my finger on went spectacularly wrong around 2004, and seemed never to recover. 

The disconnection between merit and reward?

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3 minutes ago, Social Justice League said:

House Price inflation kicked in properly in the early 2000's and it has destroyed the country imo. 

Obsession with property has destroyed peoples minds and society in general.  We are about to pay the price for 20 years of this bloody rubbish and I think it's going to be a high price for the millions who bought into this trainwreck of a property market.

It's time to pay the piper.

Have we actually seen any evidence of drops yet? I am hearing a lot of whinging about buyers “trying it on” for 20% but seeing no drop in asking prices.

dont get me wrong, as a trigger poised, gun cocked first time buyer I am ready to pounce but really want to start seeing some hard evidence that postponement for a year is a solid course of action

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8 minutes ago, Si1 said:

The disconnection between merit and reward?

That's a very good description.  It feels to me that after 2000, no matter how many qualifications you had or how hard you worked, you really don't progress anywhere in life.

Another symptom of HPI and the perceived easy money it has to offer by doing fook all and getting vast rewards.

Edited by Social Justice League
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3 minutes ago, Si1 said:

The disconnection between merit and reward?

No, it's something bigger than that. It's something I can't articulate in one post. It's paradigmatic in nature. Everything seems cheaper today, such as values, aesthetics, and workmanship. Things seem way more vacuous than they were, way less substantial. Everything sees completely warped and twisted in all spheres: economic, social, cultural, political. 

I think I just crave a good 90s rave followed by non-pc comedy and 7% on my savings. 

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49 minutes ago, Orb said:

No, it's something bigger than that. It's something I can't articulate in one post. It's paradigmatic in nature. Everything seems cheaper today, such as values, aesthetics, and workmanship. Things seem way more vacuous than they were, way less substantial. Everything sees completely warped and twisted in all spheres: economic, social, cultural, political. 

I think I just crave a good 90s rave followed by non-pc comedy and 7% on my savings. 

Our parents generation never really mentally left the 1960s - just be wary of doing the same with the 1990s!  The 60s and 90s were both outliers of being particularly good decades in Britain.

In many respects what you see is determined by the lens that you see it through...I am the same age as you, but I am a natural optimist, tending to see as positive even things which probably aren't.

However, the 2000s did see two paradigm shifts:

Firstly the huge boom in house prices around 2001-3, but most especially in 2002.   The key point of being locked out of housing is, in my view, not about when you were born but whether you owned a property before 2002 or not.  Secondly the change from "Made in Britain" to "Made in China", which is what kicked off the boom in cheap, nasty stuff, whilst at the same time draining the UK of "proper jobs".

However, socially I actually don't think things are all "warped and twisted": if anything I'm glad that racism and homophobia have retreated in those 30 years.  There's still a way to go on those, and sexism, and discrimination against the disabled, but all of those have gone in the right direction.  Technology too I think is great - better to have Zoom fatigue than no means to see your family's faces in this lockdown, and online shopping beats traipsing round shopping centres and supermarkets hands down.  But there's no getting away from the fact that unaffordable houses and 99% of stuff made by slave labourers in China is not sustainable.

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52 minutes ago, scottbeard said:

Our parents generation never really mentally left the 1960s - just be wary of doing the same with the 1990s!  The 60s and 90s were both outliers of being particularly good decades in Britain.

In many respects what you see is determined by the lens that you see it through...I am the same age as you, but I am a natural optimist, tending to see as positive even things which probably aren't.

However, the 2000s did see two paradigm shifts:

Firstly the huge boom in house prices around 2001-3, but most especially in 2002.   The key point of being locked out of housing is, in my view, not about when you were born but whether you owned a property before 2002 or not.  Secondly the change from "Made in Britain" to "Made in China", which is what kicked off the boom in cheap, nasty stuff, whilst at the same time draining the UK of "proper jobs".

However, socially I actually don't think things are all "warped and twisted": if anything I'm glad that racism and homophobia have retreated in those 30 years.  There's still a way to go on those, and sexism, and discrimination against the disabled, but all of those have gone in the right direction.  Technology too I think is great - better to have Zoom fatigue than no means to see your family's faces in this lockdown, and online shopping beats traipsing round shopping centres and supermarkets hands down.  But there's no getting away from the fact that unaffordable houses and 99% of stuff made by slave labourers in China is not sustainable.

I see the positives of technology, but tend to feel the negatives more profoundly. 

Take the digital revolution for example. I think that's the worst thing to happen to ordinary people. A selection of reasons would be: 

1) Tinder. Think of how it's shaped how an entire generation think of love, sex, and romance. Think of how a) people are essentially reduced to items in a catalogue, b) how it conveniently replaces the embodied and romantic thrill of eyes meeting across a crowded room in real life, c) it engages the paradox of choice whereby there's so much choice in the palm of your hand that one can't seem to commit to a choice, and relationships become disposable and shallow, and d) it skews the sexual market place to such an extent, it creates a sort of bubble, similar to the housing market, where even the most rotten dumps command a high price. In other words, app culture has cheapened how people approach mating and dating. 

2) Digital surveillance. I'm a lorry driver. I've seen dramatic change in the 16 years I've been doing it. Last year I suddenly noticed an inward facing camera filming me for my whole shift (10-15 hours), and my working life has never been the same since. They are abused, and are randomly screened. When my company needs to cull drivers, they do not choose redundancy, they choose to review camera footage until they spot somebody having a vape or eating a sandwich at the wheel, and sack them. Further, we have telematics, forward facing cameras, tachographs, in cab microphones, trackers, and a few other things surveying us and every tiny action is monitored and recorded. If telematics read our driving actions to be outside set parameters (such as a harsh braking incident), the boss receives and email, and we get 'retrained'. It's all a bit 1984. Work now feels like an open prison, and there is much fear and paranoia amongst drivers that was not there just 12 months ago and beyond. There is no joy in the job anymore. In wider society we have smartphones, facial recognition cameras, smarthomes (Echo, smartmeters, etc), ANPR, black boxes on cars, the list is endless. It feels overwhelming to anybody who holds privacy and freedom as a prime value, and a life where every minute action is recorded feels horrific.

3) Social media. Yes I know HPC is social media, but I'm talking about Fakebook and the like. It's a virtual space where people must be popular and showcase themselves as happy and fulfilled regardless of whether they are actually happy and fulfilled. One's profile operates as a shrine to oneself, where if one creates the illusion (through likes and friend lists) they are popular and liked, it means one must therefore be popular and liked in their mind. It's a dangerous lie, and seems to function like crack for the ego. If one fails to receive the expected or desired attention, or more profoundly, if they begin comparing their lives with others, it often perpetuates all manner of anxieties and mentally unhealthy issues, such as low self esteem, depression, and even suicidal thoughts. 

We had neither of these 3 things in 2000 in the guise or capacity we have today. 

Edited by Orb
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Greed and selfishness has destroyed Society since the 90's businesses demanded cheap lab our and the business owners wanted HPI as a side affect of using increased profits to fund BTL. Everyone was talking about BTL in the early 00's peoples lives and labour became an Income stream.

Only way to get a pay rise now is to move Jobs and no chance of any training rinse and replace.

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We're the luckiest people that ever lived. It was never going to last forever though, for anybody - none of us gets to see more than the tiniest window of time but our mini-adventure was tons better than the previous generation's (which was immeasurably better than their wartime parents' was)...and now looks like being a hell of a lot better than that of the poor sods of the future (or even anyone born 20 years after us).

There are things I hate about now (odd that it turned out to be nothing to do with the powers that be and was everything to do with people giving away all their freedoms voluntarily and living through their phones) but we're still at the 'swings and roundabouts' stage. But I do think it's going to get REALLY BAD.

I'd be shit-scared if I had kids. Thank ****** I dodged that bullet.

If all else fails, at least we can go to the pub. Oh.

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4 hours ago, frederico said:

The culture aspect is the saddest part, all this clapping for the NHS malarkey, how the hell did that start? It's all for appearances sake no depth of feeling. As with many things,  real people suffer but as it's a small number most don't get it. 

The gap between complete and utter rubbish and reality has somehow become blurred,  be it by social media, MSM or advertising. People are controlled by images and have very little idea of reality. 

I believe the fertility rate in the west is plummeting that should not be a surprise and represents the breakdown of western culture. That's the real reason for open boarders, cheap labour and canon fodder. 

If people want to clap and donate to the NHS to show their appreciation then what’s it to you? Not everyone is a miserly selfish misery guts. 

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2 hours ago, Si1 said:

The disconnection between merit and reward?

"Merit" is a flexible term though? One man`s Merit is another man`s load of sh*ite? People are just feeling their way at the moment in the new reality where you can promote yourself to the world if you wish without an outside arbitrator telling you if it has "merit" or "value" enough to be broadcast (of course the arbitrator has shifted from a person with a plummy accent at the BBC to a bunch of strangers on the internet telling you if it is c*rap or not, but the decision to broadcast now lies with the individual and that is a big shift IMO)

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2 hours ago, Orb said:

No, it's something bigger than that. It's something I can't articulate in one post. It's paradigmatic in nature. Everything seems cheaper today, such as values, aesthetics, and workmanship. Things seem way more vacuous than they were, way less substantial. Everything sees completely warped and twisted in all spheres: economic, social, cultural, political. 

I think I just crave a good 90s rave followed by non-pc comedy and 7% on my savings. 

The 90`s seemed shallow if you came of age in the 80`s, people who were young and living it large in the 70`s told you in the 80`s that "the best days for music/sex/film/everything was behind us etc.etc. etc. It`s all relative, we have to find our own way in space and time.

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2 minutes ago, dances with sheeple said:

The 90`s seemed shallow if you came of age in the 80`s, people who were young and living it large in the 70`s told you in the 80`s that "the best days for music/sex/film/everything was behind us etc.etc. etc. It`s all relative, we have to find our own way in space and time.

Correct, that thought doesn't escape me. I often think teenagers now will say in 2045 "The 2010's were the best time to be alive". 

However, economically speaking, things seem really bleak today compared with 25 years ago. 

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3 hours ago, Orb said:

3) Social media. Yes I know HPC is social media, but I'm talking about Fakebook and the like. It's a virtual space where people must be popular and showcase themselves as happy and fulfilled regardless of whether they are actually happy and fulfilled. One's profile operates as a shrine to oneself, where if one creates the illusion (through likes and friend lists) they are popular and liked, it means one must therefore be popular and liked in their mind. It's a dangerous lie, and seems to function like crack for the ego. If one fails to receive the expected or desired attention, or more profoundly, if they begin comparing their lives with others, it often perpetuates all manner of anxieties and mentally unhealthy issues, such as low self esteem, depression, and even suicidal thoughts. 

Can you imagine what its like to be a kid these days? Eughh no thanks.

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7 hours ago, scottbeard said:

I work in pensions so this could be fun.

Please start on pensions...

I was wondering the effect of the Coronavirus on how many pensions would be drawn. So far, I think it’s killed about 0.4% of all 70+ year olds. So not all that many. But I wonder if it will have shortened the lives of other who have had it.

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5 hours ago, longgone said:

Greed and selfishness has destroyed Society since the 90's businesses demanded cheap labour

People should think more deeply about these issues. You're scratching the surface and raging against something, but I don't think you go far enough.

Business don't demand cheap labour. Consumers do. Whenever you buy a foreign product you're supporting globalism and cheap labour. Even if you buy local products, if you ever make a choice based on price, you're demanding cheap labour. 

Business exist only at the whims of consumers, not the other way round.

And this isn't new. This has been happening since people first started trading. Globalism is nothing new. People want to eliminate globalism but I don't even think they know what they mean. What do they mean? No trade across nation state borders? What after that, no trade between regions because one region might have cheaper labour than another? 

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