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Was it a massive mistake to pay the Furloughed to do mostly what they want ?


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I'm wondering, as the unemployed sign a contract to prove they are job seeking for 35 hrs a week to get their £60 + a week & rent/  benefits. 

Why were the furloughed not contracted to do online or phone voluntary work to help others / society ?

Was it a rush job, too complicated to set up ?

I appreciate many folks are doing voluntary work, but the nhs volunteer scheme has been highly criticised   

 

The Twilight Zone (PILOT) - Where Is Everybody ?

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I have been noticing in recent weeks a lot of people where lockdown has not really applied to them and have continued to work, even a few a little harder than ever, have been getting really p**ed off that they have been left out of a massive paid holiday resembling something like a well paid for half gap year.

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33 minutes ago, Saving For a Space Ship said:

Why were the furloughed not contracted to do online or phone voluntary work to help others / society ?

Was it a rush job, too complicated to set up ?

With so many people living hand to mouth they had to get money to them NOW to stop mass defaults and a crime wave of people stealing food or running up giant debts.  If you recall, the fact it was announced on a Tuesday but not actioned until the following Monday (less than 1 week) caused howls of protest.

Setting up work for millions of people to do would have taken months - furlough would have been over before it started, and that's assuming the people were competent at doing it and actually turned up for work.

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I'm seeing some of this 'them and us' starting to emerge in my company, we have about 30% of the workforce on furlough scheme. However, what neither parties understand is that if the work doesn't return the furlough workers will be the first ones to be made redundant - unfortunately.

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2 minutes ago, scottbeard said:

With so many people living hand to mouth they had to get money to them NOW to stop mass defaults and a crime wave of people stealing food or running up giant debts.  If you recall, the fact it was announced on a Tuesday but not actioned until the following Monday (less than 1 week) caused howls of protest.

Setting up work for millions of people to do would have taken months - furlough would have been over before it started, and that's assuming the people were competent at doing it and actually turned up for work.

The voice of common sense 

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22 minutes ago, crumblingcon said:

I have been noticing in recent weeks a lot of people where lockdown has not really applied to them and have continued to work, even a few a little harder than ever, have been getting really p**ed off that they have been left out of a massive paid holiday resembling something like a well paid for half gap year.

I am one of those people (kind of). 

I wouldn't say lock down hasn't applied to me. Wife has closed her business temporarily (staff furloughed but none of the self employed people involved get diddly squat so far) but is still doing online stuff whilst trying to deal with our kids. I'm working from home, trying to manage useless ******ing trainees who need their hands holding through every little decision (they're not all like this by a long shot, before anyone starts, just these two), deal with the mountains of my own actual work I have to do and try to chip in with the kids and the house to keep wifey sane (no cleaner due to lockdown either), all with constant update calls and the boss dangling redundancy over our heads like the sword of Damocles plus the whole looming recession and global ******ing pandemic.

It's like swimming through treacle being chased by a hungry alligator. Started out ok but as it's becoming clearer how much harder it is to actually deliver our work like this the pressure is ramping up and the pressure on me as main bread winner is high. 

To top it all off, I'm being told I'll be bring handed an increased tax bill for all this as well as paying for it through inflation and a pay freeze. Wonderful news. 

Broadly supportive of the concept but there needs to be some recognition of the unfairness of it and some gratitude on the part of the furloughed. 

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Yes.

Too generous - they could of made it 70%, and I still think most people would of thought that was a good deal to be at home doing nothing and enough to live on.

It should of had some restrictions - some businesses should of had to contribute something from day one. The very young, e.g. those living with parents without mortgage or rent responsibilities should of received nothing or a much smaller percentage.

It is like a drug that will be very hard to wean people off.

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1 hour ago, crumblingcon said:

I have been noticing in recent weeks a lot of people where lockdown has not really applied to them and have continued to work, even a few a little harder than ever, have been getting really p**ed off that they have been left out of a massive paid holiday resembling something like a well paid for half gap year.

I have not been feeling to jealous of my friends being furloughed seeing the amount of stress they are going through and the level of uncertainty they are facing 

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35 minutes ago, Hullabaloo82 said:

I am one of those people (kind of). 

I wouldn't say lock down hasn't applied to me. Wife has closed her business temporarily (staff furloughed but none of the self employed people involved get diddly squat so far) but is still doing online stuff whilst trying to deal with our kids. I'm working from home, trying to manage useless ******ing trainees who need their hands holding through every little decision (they're not all like this by a long shot, before anyone starts, just these two), deal with the mountains of my own actual work I have to do and try to chip in with the kids and the house to keep wifey sane (no cleaner due to lockdown either), all with constant update calls and the boss dangling redundancy over our heads like the sword of Damocles plus the whole looming recession and global ******ing pandemic.

It's like swimming through treacle being chased by a hungry alligator. Started out ok but as it's becoming clearer how much harder it is to actually deliver our work like this the pressure is ramping up and the pressure on me as main bread winner is high. 

To top it all off, I'm being told I'll be bring handed an increased tax bill for all this as well as paying for it through inflation and a pay freeze. Wonderful news. 

Broadly supportive of the concept but there needs to be some recognition of the unfairness of it and some gratitude on the part of the furloughed. 

+1 

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What's the thoughts on those furloughed being more at risk of redundancy? Than those that do the same job, but continue to work.

 

I know of a few cases where as soon as the lock down happened, some employees refused to go in - they were furloughed. However others did, and are keeping the company going. I would like to think if the company does need to cut costs, those that worked are considered higher than those that didn't.

 

 

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If I am totally honest - I am furloughed as is my better half both on 80% and having the best time of our life in the garden with our 2 young kids with all bills paid and no stress except is the sun going to shine today. I appreciate this will not be a popular post yet thought I would share it with you good people to confirm what you are pretty sure is happening anyway.

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3 minutes ago, The Real Eagle said:

If I am totally honest - I am furloughed as is my better half both on 80% and having the best time of our life in the garden with our 2 young kids with all bills paid and no stress except is the sun going to shine today. I appreciate this will not be a popular post yet thought I would share it with you good people to confirm what you are pretty sure is happening anyway.

Popular with me - I dont benefit from the scheme, but it makes me happy that someone is enjoying life - which is the whole bloody point of life!!

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1 hour ago, dougless said:

Look on the bright side, the furlough scheme will help to crash the economy which in turn will help the ongoing collapse in property prices.

I am seriously fine with it when it comes to those that got it, good luck to them, c***s?

But you know what it's like, as soon as people get something the rest don't then the little green monster starts raising his head and it can get a little nasty. I always remember a company I was working for years ago where half of those with company cars were given deals to buy the car for next to nothing and the other half were fobbed off. It was so funny how it affected the moral for months after and it really became quite bitter and angry workplace, even friendships were lost.

On the other side of the coin with this though, there are a sizable group out there who earn far more than £2500 per month in normal circumstances and who have committed themselves to monthly payments, cars, houses etc, this has to be hurting them

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10 minutes ago, Jason said:

What's the thoughts on those furloughed being more at risk of redundancy? Than those that do the same job, but continue to work.

 

I know of a few cases where as soon as the lock down happened, some employees refused to go in - they were furloughed. However others did, and are keeping the company going. I would like to think if the company does need to cut costs, those that worked are considered higher than those that didn't.

 

 

Actively working on it with a client - not out of malice just that if your smaller team can deliver the goods why change a winning formula at half time ? 

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8 minutes ago, The Real Eagle said:

If I am totally honest - I am furloughed as is my better half both on 80% and having the best time of our life in the garden with our 2 young kids with all bills paid and no stress except is the sun going to shine today. I appreciate this will not be a popular post yet thought I would share it with you good people to confirm what you are pretty sure is happening anyway.

I have been saying this for a while now on here, I am seeing people in my village loving this lockdown, big country gardens, evening walks up to our very scenic village church in the evening, empty roads to jog and cycle. If you put the obvious little negatives to one side it really is quite pleasant for many.

I personally have my own business and it's costing me, but even I am getting a load of positives out of this, I am a f****g great cook now as well? 

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27 minutes ago, zugzwang said:

Was it a mistake to gift the banksters with a decade-long rolling bailout and profiteering opportunity?

Yes.

A much bigger and longer term mistake, without which the recent rolling bailout would not even be necessary, is/was to grant the commercial banks the (almost exclusive) right to create and lend to us at interest our essential medium of exchange.

Continuously they charge us enormous amounts for the existence and the use of their free to produce electronic numbers.

'Rent-a-currency' is the mother of all scams.

 

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9 minutes ago, The Real Eagle said:

If I am totally honest - I am furloughed as is my better half both on 80% and having the best time of our life in the garden with our 2 young kids with all bills paid and no stress except is the sun going to shine today. I appreciate this will not be a popular post yet thought I would share it with you good people to confirm what you are pretty sure is happening anyway.

Good on you - happy days and times with kids is so precious we all make our choices. I don't get a bean since running my own business paid with dividends and over the years paid hundreds of thousands in taxes maybe a low 7 figure sum. No problem with it all but think it has now gone on too long or at least it will.

I think though too many people think life will just take off where it left off it really won't - the sense amongst business owners and bosses is people are my biggest cost I am going to be fine and make good money in the next  phase but with far less people - not saying that applies to you

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10 minutes ago, GregBowman said:

Actively working on it with a client - not out of malice just that if your smaller team can deliver the goods why change a winning formula at half time ? 

100% this.

As I alluded to earlier, all of our furloughed employees are now essentially "at risk" to use the proper HR.

Edited by Smiley George
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9 minutes ago, crumblingcon said:

 

On the other side of the coin with this though, there are a sizable group out there who earn far more than £2500 per month in normal circumstances and who have committed themselves to monthly payments, cars, houses etc, this has to be hurting them

This is me (only without the sizeable car payments and a very manageable mortgage); I know, boo hoo, but we were offered the chance to furlough voluntarily but the cap would be a sizeable pay cut for me so it was a non starter. Could have afforded it comfortably but who volunteers for a pay cut in the run up to what we're being told is the financial apocalypse whilst at the same time indicating to the boss they're not that committed to the job? 

I think they'll keep weaning companies off it gradually rather than risk mass redundancies (you can trust the Tories with economy, see) on their watch too, so a lot more people will "get away with it" than you think, too. 

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35 minutes ago, Andy T said:

Yes.

Too generous - they could of made it 70%, and I still think most people would of thought that was a good deal to be at home doing nothing and enough to live on.

It should of had some restrictions - some businesses should of had to contribute something from day one. The very young, e.g. those living with parents without mortgage or rent responsibilities should of received nothing or a much smaller percentage.

It is like a drug that will be very hard to wean people off.

I think a lot of this public and media so called outrage about returning to work, fueled by troublemaker politicians like Sturgeon is in a lot of cases disingenuous, just people now getting too comfortable on that sofa and dreading the biggest Monday feeling in history

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