Jump to content
House Price Crash Forum

Homebuyers plotting move to country and increased home working


Recommended Posts

Well, that's what it says here at any rate. So, are people finally deciding that working from home is feasible and they can leave London and other cities, or is this the idle online musings of bored dreamers trapped indoors for several weeks? And is this really good news for areas like the West Country or the North of Scotland (Inverness & Shetland topping the searches list)?

Also, I suspect that very few of these folks have considered any of the downsides to living in rural areas (potential isolation, weather, limited facilities, time and costs of travel to places like schools, hospitals, anywhere "urban", etc.). You can't eat the scenery....

Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Shrink Proof said:

You can't eat the scenery

A lot of the scenery around here is edible: sheep, potatoes.... You can buy a lot of local food in farm shops and it usually tastes better than supermarket food.

More seriously, as long as you are reasonably near a town you will have a reasonable number of pubs and restaurants, hospitals may be further away but GPs tend to be less stretched than in big cities. As for schools, people are getting a taste of home education and some like. We have been doing it for years, and although we have to drive to get kids to things its not every day and is better overall (no more time on the road, and less stressful as its not at quieter times) than an urban school run.

You will miss out on art and theatre and really good restaurants (or at least have to drive a bit to get to them) , but for how many people are those a big part of their lives?
 

51 minutes ago, Ghostly said:

I will be watching closely to see if UK Govt fulfils its promises about full fibre to the premises internet too.

We do not need FTTP - people are working from home fine with FTTC. What would be more useful IMO would be lower latency and better upload speeds.

Link to post
Share on other sites

No please no keep the townies out of here. The last thing I want is a city hpc bit no country one. You know the types who need a range rover sport to drop sprog at school so God knows what they will bring to the narrow country roads in case it may get slightly muddy or a flake of snow falls. The Honda civic is fine for such things nobody except farmers needs a suv here. On a serious note I wonder what will happen to village life if alot of newcomers suddenly move in.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think this is ********.

As I have posted I live in nice but not top expensive Norfolk.

(Before covid) I earned x times average wage and finding a nice house is hard.

A nice sized estate house in a semi rural location which is like any estate in country.... 350-500.

Then you move to house with 800m2 plus garden with country view...500 and needing work.

Then if you are like me and fancy non estate four beds and need a good school...over 500.

Anything posh 600 plus and already owned by someone from London loads over 800/900k

The sad fact is it's over priced here someone posted a thread about price falls in nice Croydon a 200m2 4bed with garden near schools and jobs 700k ish.

I would say that's better value than the Hoveton equivalent at 600 as the former would rent for 2000 plus and the latter 1200.

 

Edited by Fromage Frais
Link to post
Share on other sites
21 minutes ago, Fromage Frais said:

I think this is ********.

 

Agreed, already in the majority of nice towns locals are priced out by 'incomers'. 10 years ago on the Isle of skye there wasn't a single property of any kind under £250k, even a bedsit above a carpet shop. 

I also don't think that many employers will suddenly allow the majority of people to WFH. Mine has already said productivity is down almost 50% but that's okay for now because of the situation we are in, they issued guidance telling people at home to relax, to not expect to be as productive as you can be in the office. They are quite clear though we can't afford to continue at this pace once we get back to normal. 

Link to post
Share on other sites

All these people have to sell their London homes first to raise the funds to relocate - so someone has to want to buy them at the 'right price'.

Perhaps easier for renters - hand it your notice and move in a few weeks. And why even restrict yourself to the UK - Ireland and for now the EEA area are also options given transition is likely to be extended.

Surely best to rent first - and then see if you like living more remotedly. Its nice in May - not so nice in January if you get snowbound for a week?!

I certainly don't think productivity from working at home is higher - its fine for senior managers who spend all day waffling in endless MS teams or Skype meetings delivering FA but less so for more junior staff doing operational or transactional or spreadsheets. Laptops crash more, documents take long to save, home wifi is unpredictable, noisy neighbours distractions of family/children etc. I expect real productivity is way down! And that is before people swelter in 30 degrees heat in the summer - they will miss their air conditioned offices then!

Edited by MARTINX9
Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, 12fixer said:

I wonder how much of the increase in Rightmoves website traffic is people like us house prices crashers looking hoping to see 'reduced' sale prices.

Probably comparing what £400k gets you in Hackney compares to a town in the Highlands ranked as one of the nicest places to live in the UK. They are both about the same distance from a station! And the Highland one is actually closer to a local general hospital and an airport and the beach - and has an indoor gym.

https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-85934147.html

https://www.rightmove.co.uk/property-for-sale/property-89353943.html

 

 

Edited by MARTINX9
Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, regprentice said:

I also don't think that many employers will suddenly allow the majority of people to WFH. Mine has already said productivity is down almost 50% but that's okay for now because of the situation we are in, they issued guidance telling people at home to relax, to not expect to be as productive as you can be in the office. They are quite clear though we can't afford to continue at this pace once we get back to normal. 

It's no wonder people aren't as productive at home currently... many are home schooling (or simply just trying to keep happy) their kids at the same time. As a parent and worker, this current situation is very stressful where I'm left feeling like I'm failing at both and my household has a stay at home parent (but our 1 year old means one adult is pretty much permanently taken out by her).

Employers are lucky they are getting much productivity at all currently, rewind just 15 years and they'd have got pretty much 0 productivity in this crisis from most workers.

Link to post
Share on other sites
40 minutes ago, Save me from the madness! said:

It's no wonder people aren't as productive at home currently... many are home schooling (or simply just trying to keep happy) their kids at the same time. As a parent and worker, this current situation is very stressful where I'm left feeling like I'm failing at both and my household has a stay at home parent (but our 1 year old means one adult is pretty much permanently taken out by her).

Employers are lucky they are getting much productivity at all currently, rewind just 15 years and they'd have got pretty much 0 productivity in this crisis from most workers.

So true. The wife and I are WFH full time and doing home schooling and it's bloody stressful. Plus, even when the kids aren't doing work, you feel bad for just letting them play on consoles or watch TV the rest of the time.

Link to post
Share on other sites

My heart until the day I die will always be in London SW19, was born and bred there,  but would I ever live there again, not for all the money in the world. I have been rural for decades now, and even when there were times when I was totally skint, and I mean skint, many of the things I love doing did not cost a penny and will forever continue not to cost a penny. From running, cycling openwater swimming, just hiking in the lush countryside in May, sitting watch a crappy Village cricket match drinking one or two beers in Summer, and going out to the secret fields in Autumn  and filling a sack with L caps(but that was in the old days of course) ?, but that's not a story for here.

I hope people do make that move out of the City, hopefully not too many though so we end up  getting  over crowded, but people considering Scotland and and the Isles, I have driven on roads in the far North where there is grass in the centre they are so unused and you really feel like you are in the wilderness.

Just one or maybe two weekend trips a year back to London will do me these days.

Edited by crumblingcon
Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm biased because I've already made the move out of London but I can't see how housing costs can be sustained there.

This period has proven that there's no need for my company to have an office. Despite all the issues with childcare etc work has been more productive.

Public transport is going to be screwed for quite a long time so colleagues near the city are no better off than me ~100 miles away. A lot of them have ditched rented flat to live back at home with parents anyway.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Ghostly said:

Really interesting topic.  I think this crisis will really accelerate these trends.  I think quite a few CEOs and CFOs are also seeing how much they could save in rent, rates, travel costs, etc.  Great time to be a landlord!

I will be watching closely to see if UK Govt fulfils its promises about full fibre to the premises internet too.

There are downsides to rural living but there are also the upsides of lower population density so less likely to be affected by pandemics.

Won`t be that if everyone decides it`s now a "thing" to move there?

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, regprentice said:

Agreed, already in the majority of nice towns locals are priced out by 'incomers'. 10 years ago on the Isle of skye there wasn't a single property of any kind under £250k, even a bedsit above a carpet shop. 

I also don't think that many employers will suddenly allow the majority of people to WFH. Mine has already said productivity is down almost 50% but that's okay for now because of the situation we are in, they issued guidance telling people at home to relax, to not expect to be as productive as you can be in the office. They are quite clear though we can't afford to continue at this pace once we get back to normal. 

The money to buy that piece of "paradise" comes from equity "earned" elsewhere though, probably in a large town or city, and if people are not going out, not working, and lending is tightening then that equity won`t be there any more, so the room above a chip shop won`t attract dafties with silly money to spend, in fact the bedsit you mention could only be pumped by the daftness that is "London Money", so that about says it all really.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

  • 417 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.