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New right to add 2 floors to existing flats without planning permission.


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In an extension of the reduction of planning restrictions that allowed office blocks to be turned into flats, developers are now being allowed to add 2 floors to existing flats. Scheme starts 'in the summer' 

It would appear to be literally any block of flats, a New build 15 stories or an older townhouse that's been turned into flats (as per the picture in the article). They won't allow the Conversion of existing houses into 'new flats' just for this purpose. 

Im lost as to quite how you just add 2 stories to a building not originally designed to carry that weight. Id imagine most buildings couldn't be added to in that way.... But if you don't need planninng permission, what's going to stop you having a go? 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/mar/12/property-owners-right-build-upwards-without-planning-permission

Edited by regprentice
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6 hours ago, regprentice said:

In an extension of the reduction of planning restrictions that allowed office blocks to be turned into flats, developers are now being allowed to add 2 floors to existing flats. Scheme starts 'in the summer' 

It would appear to be literally any block of flats, a New build 15 stories or an older townhouse that's been turned into flats (as per the picture in the article). They won't allow the Conversion of existing houses into 'new flats' just for this purpose. 

Im lost as to quite how you just add 2 stories to a building not originally designed to carry that weight. Id imagine most buildings couldn't be added to in that way.... But if you don't need planninng permission, what's going to stop you having a go? 

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2020/mar/12/property-owners-right-build-upwards-without-planning-permission

Easy you just add extra floors on top. They do it in lots of other countries. Sure they sometimes collapse but mostly they don't.

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9 hours ago, regprentice said:

Im lost as to quite how you just add 2 stories to a building not originally designed to carry that weight. Id imagine most buildings couldn't be added to in that way.... But if you don't need planninng permission, what's going to stop you having a go?

The fact that, like any development currently, you will still need building regulations to sign-off? 

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17 hours ago, Oki said:

Building regulations.

 

13 hours ago, dugsbody said:

The fact that, like any development currently, you will still need building regulations to sign-off? 

But you can get building regs retrospectively. I couldn't finish the sale of my house til the owner got a completion certificate for work done 15 years ago. As I understand it the completion inspection meant a 'nice man from the council' came round for a coffee and a quick look at the outside of the house. They certainly didn't tear up floorboards to check if the right sized load bearing joists had been used. And they definitely didn't check the wiring because when I went to change a light fitting months later the mains lighting cable in the roof void was thin grey cable, with no positive or negative markings, similar looking to speaker extension wire. 

My dad sold double glazing and estimated some building work. He took it quite seriously and attended council meetings and courses. He was always driving around pointing out windows and extensions which were against building regs. This is in Aberdeen where a large part of the city is a 'conservation area' due to the granite buildings, despite some of these areas being low value tenements. 

In some cases its cosmetic, all the windows in a a unform set of buildings have different shaped or coloured windows where they shouldnt, but in others it's dangerous, 3rd floor flats with windows that don't open to escape in case of a fire. Once those windows are in its easy to tell from the street but the council does nothing about it. 

Some developers out there will factor in a fine for not submitting a building warrant application as part of their cost of doing business. Build what they like and submit an 'optimistic' drawing in retrospect for retrospective certification. 

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  • 415 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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