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Supermarkets Under Threat From The Butcher The Grocer And The Fishmonger.

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I started a thread last year on the threat on - line poses for the big players, and want to take this opportunity to update my thoughts.

* Huge swing to on - line shopping.

*Supermarkets will LOSE trade because people will resort to local butchers, fishmongers and grocers for thier fresh food purchases because many of us like to view before buying, whilst restricting online supermarket purchases to washing powder, cereal etc.

* Time saved by not having to do the supermarket run = time to visit the butcher and farm shop.

CONCLUSION; - LARGE RETAIL UNITS WILL BECOME RARE. Cant see mant electrical retailers needing shops much longer.

No doubt some supermarkets will take the Waitrose route by including in - store specialists, but I think many of us would still rather 'nip' into the local butcher rather than all the hassle of queing in a supermarket, and continue to restrict the supermarket to the non - fresh weekly on - line shop.

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I certainly see traditional high streets making something of a resurgence in the next decade. I don't see this seriously impacting on supermarkets, and I don't see it as being the result of increased online trading.

I think the supermarkets themselves with their constant desire to cater for the lowest common denominator will drive away a small part of their middle class custom who will increasingly prefer to buy some things from small independents who they trust.

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I started a thread last year on the threat on - line poses for the big players, and want to take this opportunity to update my thoughts.

* Huge swing to on - line shopping.

*Supermarkets will LOSE trade because people will resort to local butchers, fishmongers and grocers for thier fresh food purchases because many of us like to view before buying, whilst restricting online supermarket purchases to washing powder, cereal etc.

* Time saved by not having to do the supermarket run = time to visit the butcher and farm shop.

CONCLUSION; - LARGE RETAIL UNITS WILL BECOME RARE. Cant see mant electrical retailers needing shops much longer.

No doubt some supermarkets will take the Waitrose route by including in - store specialists, but I think many of us would still rather 'nip' into the local butcher rather than all the hassle of queing in a supermarket, and continue to restrict the supermarket to the non - fresh weekly on - line shop.

haven't you gone to live in Eastern Europe yet ?

dont keep your prospective tenants waiting.........

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I certainly see traditional high streets making something of a resurgence in the next decade. I don't see this seriously impacting on supermarkets, and I don't see it as being the result of increased online trading.

I think the supermarkets themselves with their constant desire to cater for the lowest common denominator will drive away a small part of their middle class custom who will increasingly prefer to buy some things from small independents who they trust.

The reason I see a lot of people only retaining the on - line supermarket jolly for the non - fresh items is 'TRUST'.

I dont trust a spotty order - picker to not pick the joint of beef with the green tinge.

Watch people when they rumage through fresh fruit and veg. Do we really think these people will now put the fresh food needs of thier family in the hands of a zitty teenager?

Online for non - fresh only I say. Bring on the butcher.

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I think you are both in cloud cuckoo land . The retailers will get stronger and stronger

1) The retailer has so much power , prices will always be cheaper

2) No-one wants to go to the butcher and then the grocer and then the shop to buy a CD . We don't have time anymore

3) I am in the meat business and you can be sure someone like Tesco will audit your company many times a year always checking quality and standards

4) Easy and free parking

5) Do you really want to pay with a credit card for your newspaper and then your grocery and then again at the butchers .

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I think you are both in cloud cuckoo land . The retailers will get stronger and stronger

1) The retailer has so much power , prices will always be cheaper

2) No-one wants to go to the butcher and then the grocer and then the shop to buy a CD . We don't have time anymore

3) I am in the meat business and you can be sure someone like Tesco will audit your company many times a year always checking quality and standards

4) Easy and free parking

5) Do you really want to pay with a credit card for your newspaper and then your grocery and then again at the butchers .

1) 90% of products can be found cheaper at markets, local shops

2) I enjoy a trip to my butchers, where i know the provenance of my meat and it has been hung properly

3) Meat is not a generic product. Perhaps you order the 'meat curry' at an Indian

4) I walk. The exercise does you good. Look at european obesity.

5) I don't need a loan to buy my food.

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My bit of London (Southfields) has a small but remarkably good little area of shops. We have a couple of mini-supermarkets, a post-office, three banks, a butcher, a greengrocer, a baker, a fishmonger, a french deli, an italian deli, a chemist (oh, and about 7 estate agents).

My wife shops at these almost daily - we hardly need a freezer.

We tried online shopping, but found it too restrictive - waiting until you had a big list before you order (to avoid the £6 delivery charge) meant that we kept running out of stuff.

I think small shops have a great future in big cities, but the big-supermarket-surrounded-by-carpark model makes much more sense in rural areas.

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I think you are both in cloud cuckoo land . The retailers will get stronger and stronger

1) The retailer has so much power , prices will always be cheaper

2) No-one wants to go to the butcher and then the grocer and then the shop to buy a CD . We don't have time anymore

3) I am in the meat business and you can be sure someone like Tesco will audit your company many times a year always checking quality and standards

4) Easy and free parking

5) Do you really want to pay with a credit card for your newspaper and then your grocery and then again at the butchers .

My wife and most of the other Women in my village do the main non - fresh items on - line, but use a local farm shop (I hear they are spreading rapidly) for meat, veg etc.

A pleasant quick experience.

If my argument that peolpe like to pick thier own meat and veg carefully is'nt correct, how come people rummage through the meat and veg at Tesco's so dilligently.

Supermarket P45s here we come.

I think small shops have a great future in big cities, but the big-supermarket-surrounded-by-carpark model makes much more sense in rural areas.

I live in a rural area. The resurgance of farm shops, butchers etc is at the expense of supermarkets. My experience recently is that people started off doing all the weekly shop online, but have now restriceted this to non - fresh items only.

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Mr Nice

Good luck to you .

Sadly though I think you are in the minority . You must have lots of time on your hands

Just for the record - I NEVER order meat curry , but prefer when the mrs makes me an Organic chicken one. Much tastier

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1) The retailer has so much power , prices will always be cheaper

Yes, the prices will probably be cheaper.

But increasingly, a small but wealthy group of people are willing to pay a premium for high quality products and to know that what they are buying doesn't come at the expense of a farmer, a third world worker, the environment, etc. etc.

It is a niche area, hence why I don't think the big retailers will suffer, but it is an area I see growing strongly.

2) No-one wants to go to the butcher and then the grocer and then the shop to buy a CD . We don't have time anymore

Rubbish. We are repeatedly told by various media bodies that our lives are incredibly busy now, but are they? When I was small I don't remember my parents sitting around twiddling their thumbs because they had nothing to do.

We are not busier now. What has happened is that the benefit attached to various activities has changed for many people.

But for the wealthy group identified above, there is a high perceived benefit in shopping around for quality products from their local high street.

3) I am in the meat business and you can be sure someone like Tesco will audit your company many times a year always checking quality and standards

I am sure they do. My wife runs a high street florists. I am sure Tescos are ****-a-hooop at being able to offer a dozen red roses on Valentines day for £16.00. Strangely, she has no problem finding customers who prefer her to make them at £50. If you were to see the two arrangements side-by-side you would immediately understand why.

4) Easy and free parking

High streets cater for people who live largely within walking distance. It was ever thus.

5) Do you really want to pay with a credit card for your newspaper and then your grocery and then again at the butchers.

I don't think this bothers most people. Big purchase, pay by card, small purchase, pay cash.

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Why, if this trend should expand, would the large retailers not join in?

The stuff I buy, organic, vegetarian, has in the area of processed, packaged and tinned items seen the big players move in and some small successful manufacturers taken over by the big players.

The big groups are always looking for new openings.

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Why, if this trend should expand, would the large retailers not join in?

The stuff I buy, organic, vegetarian, has in the area of processed, packaged and tinned items seen the big players move in and some small successful manufacturers taken over by the big players.

The big groups are always looking for new openings.

Mush, the reason my wife only does the non - fresh items on - line at the supermarket, is we dont like the idea of spotty order pickers chosing our meat, fish, fruit and veg.

Also the farm shop (these are springup everywhere) can deliver the fresh items anyway BUT BUT BUT, they ensure we get high quality non - putrified produce in a way that the spotty order pickers in giant supermarket warehouses simply cant achieve.

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Mr Nice

Good luck to you .

Sadly though I think you are in the minority . You must have lots of time on your hands

Just for the record - I NEVER order meat curry , but prefer when the mrs makes me an Organic chicken one. Much tastier

Thanks!

I guess i just place a lot of importance on food both its source and its consumption and will happily spend time on that interest.

Good choice on the curry front! Especially if you can get her indoors to make it for you.

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My bit of London (Southfields) has a small but remarkably good little area of shops. We have a couple of mini-supermarkets, a post-office, three banks, a butcher, a greengrocer, a baker, a fishmonger, a french deli, an italian deli, a chemist (oh, and about 7 estate agents).

My wife shops at these almost daily - we hardly need a freezer.

We tried online shopping, but found it too restrictive - waiting until you had a big list before you order (to avoid the £6 delivery charge) meant that we kept running out of stuff.

I think small shops have a great future in big cities, but the big-supermarket-surrounded-by-carpark model makes much more sense in rural areas.

All the best bits of London are effectively small villages with all the traditional advantages.

Another good reason for the demand for these properties to stay buoyant.

I used to shop after work almost everyday in Chiswick. Organic supermarket open til 8pm. Best of all worlds.

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I guess i just place a lot of importance on food both its source and its consumption and will happily spend time on that interest.

And youre right to so do. Your body and health are but a reflection of the molecules it ingests.

People who care not about food have only half a brain. They find plenty of time to indulge in petty inconsequentials such as drooling over thier tekkie divices.

Its like people who say they have'nt time to excercise - we all have time even if it means doing sit - ups in front of the telly or turning a romp with the kids into excercies or deliberatley holding shopping bags without swapping arms etc.

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And youre right to so do. Your body and health are but a reflection of the molecules it ingests.

People who care not about food have only half a brain. They find plenty of time to indulge in petty inconsequentials such as drooling over thier tekkie divices.

Its like people who say they have'nt time to excercise - we all have time even if it means doing sit - ups in front of the telly or turning a romp with the kids into excercies or deliberatley holding shopping bags without swapping arms etc.

Sex is good excercise. I think, at least it used to be. Can't remember now.

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Mush, the reason my wife only does the non - fresh items on - line at the supermarket, is we dont like the idea of spotty order pickers chosing our meat, fish, fruit and veg.

Also the farm shop (these are springup everywhere) can deliver the fresh items anyway BUT BUT BUT, they ensure we get high quality non - putrified produce in a way that the spotty order pickers in giant supermarket warehouses simply cant achieve.

What I meant was that I can envisage the big players moving into "high street shops" but not neccessarily having their name over the door. Who owns your local "family" named undertaker? Possibly into buying farms and having farm shops.

Or, of course, they might just expand more overseas in the the Far East and Eastern Europe.

Of one thing you can be sure, the large groups will not stand still. Fortunes can turn too quickly now.

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Supermarkets try to make us reliant on them. There are a few things that i try to do that cut them out - i know the food is extremely good quality, and in some cases it takes less effort. I'm more bothered that the food is locally produced and in season than organic.

If something is organic - it isn't always better especially if it is out of season, and has travelled halfway across the world. (UK are the world experts in apples - but the organic apples we buy here in the supermarket are from places like the USA).

These are the things that take less effort for me:

Anyway - i have my non-homogonised (not sure how you spell it) milk delivered to my doorstep each morning (i don't have to order online it's just there!). We now never run out of milk like we did when we got it from the supermarket.

My friend has a small holding and we order half a lamb/ 10kilos beef every so often - it turns up on our doorstep ready in different cuts (all organic) - far cheaper than the supermarket.

Chicken i get when there's one available.

I visit the farm shop once a week for mostly organic local produce. It's far higher quality, and a lot cheaper. I try and combine that with a trip to their cafe (all locally produced food).

Also my bin is less full at the end of a week because there is less rubbish.

I feel very lucky having all these available. I do use supermarkets. But i love that i use it a lot less for the food - it works out far easier. I feel the food is far, far better quality than at the supermarket.

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Supermarkets try to make us reliant on them. There are a few things that i try to do that cut them out - i know the food is extremely good quality, and in some cases it takes less effort. I'm more bothered that the food is locally produced and in season than organic.

If something is organic - it isn't always better especially if it is out of season, and has travelled halfway across the world. (UK are the world experts in apples - but the organic apples we buy here in the supermarket are from places like the USA).

These are the things that take less effort for me:

Anyway - i have my non-homogonised (not sure how you spell it) milk delivered to my doorstep each morning (i don't have to order online it's just there!). We now never run out of milk like we did when we got it from the supermarket.

My friend has a small holding and we order half a lamb/ 10kilos beef every so often - it turns up on our doorstep ready in different cuts (all organic) - far cheaper than the supermarket.

Chicken i get when there's one available.

I visit the farm shop once a week for mostly organic local produce. It's far higher quality, and a lot cheaper. I try and combine that with a trip to their cafe (all locally produced food).

Also my bin is less full at the end of a week because there is less rubbish.

I feel very lucky having all these available. I do use supermarkets. But i love that i use it a lot less for the food - it works out far easier. I feel the food is far, far better quality than at the supermarket.

There is a quiet revolt against supermarkets. Even some chavs I know are know opting for local farm shops and butchers selling local non - messed with food.

Fresh food, and on - line supermarket shopping dont mix. The big boys on - line adventure has back - fired.

Supermarket redundancies just around the corner.

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There is a quiet revolt against supermarkets. Even some chavs I know are know opting for local farm shops and butchers selling local non - messed with food.

Fresh food, and on - line supermarket shopping dont mix. The big boys on - line adventure has back - fired.

Supermarket redundancies just around the corner.

I have to say when i have bought fresh food from a supermarket online - it's looked fine. It's not the people who handle the food (if i thought that - i'd never eat out, and i'd wipe door handles before i touched them!). It's where it comes from and not who's touched it in the supermarket that's the issue. Plus having not so long ago gone into a Tescos in Milton Keynes - to feel a bit overwhelmed by the size of it!

We really ought to think where and how our food is produced - supermarkets sell their food on how it looks/and price, we have been locked into the idea if it it's cheap - it's better - rather than how it tastes etc. They really are quite devious - we have to learn to see beyond the Aladins cave - and if "Chav's" (i don't like using the word) are learning this - then that can only be a good thing.

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High streets cater for people who live largely within walking distance. It was ever thus.

So great if you live in a crappy flat above a kebab house, or your husband/wife stays at home and can go shopping during the day... lousy for the rest of us.

Just had to go to the bank to pay in a cheque. Not only has car parking gone up from 30p to 70p over the last two or three years, but it just went up to 80p... that's a couple of percent of the cheque gone just to park long enough to get to the bank and back. But hey, I guess I should be thankful that inflation is low or the parking charges might have nearly trebled in three years... oh, hang on, they have?

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Supermarkets are clearly here to stay, but I think people are;

a) more willing to pay higher prices for better quality foods, and they can get this from local outlets who have reputations to think about (spotty chavs serving in the supermarkets dont care).

B) the increasing cost of fuel means its sometimes cheaper to buy online or from local shops now. I decided to nip out to get a few beers on Friday night, the local Spar about 2 miles away. I paid 40p more for some beers than I couldve in Tesco, but Tesco is 4 miles further (still local, but thats about £1 more in fuel..)

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Don't get me started about supermarkets.

The quality of basic fresh produce sold at supermarkets has been systematically declining over the last 15 years.

Why should I buy your "Ripen at Home" kiwis. Why dont' YOU sell ripe ones.

Half the Tesco fruit and veg I buy has to end up in the bin. The beef tastes like it's been pumped with water.

Why are there no TESCO supermarkets in France? The French consumer would boycottt them.

Why are UK consumers so willing to put up with it?

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Yes its terrible - the poor supermarkets just can't compete with the small local businesses. Its just not fair. Why should they be allowed to open up on the high street of all places, when the supermarket megastores have to make do with the out-of-town locations? Tesco's will be out of business before we know it while old Bloggs & Sons family butchers corner the sausage market.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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