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Foreign aid should be indexed to education and family planning. Look at average ages of childbirth in these developing countries.

https://data.unicef.org/topic/child-health/adolescent-health/

Until women are free to be educated and attain employment instead of being socialised into baby farming they cannot escape the poverty cycle.

 

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Citation?

I think the figure for Germany is 7% of professors are born outside germany, cf 23% in the UK. The German system is pretty geared to appointing people with German qualifications. tbf the German govt knows there is a problem and has been encouraging universities to consider a wider range of applicants

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I think the figure for Germany is 7% of professors are born outside germany, cf 23% in the UK. The German system is pretty geared to appointing people with German qualifications. tbf the German govt knows there is a problem and has been encouraging universities to consider a wider range of applicants

I still think a lot of this is because most academics learn English as that's the international language of publication, so the UK is an easy location to survive in, whereas for Germany then you're going to need to know English, German, and your native language.

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The idea that the EU is not working against corruption and the issue with Poland and Hungary is related to muslim immigration is laughable. Firstly, the EU Commission works hard against corruption, but it is small and relatively weak so can't stamp it out immediately and needs national governments to work on it. Secondly, the issue with Poland and Hungary is over respect for the rule of law and democracy, not immigration.

I know of a smattering (parents and children or siblings), but it's not common as UK academia doesn't pay as well compared to other professions as it does in Italy, so that is also likely to be a factor - i.e. you can have a very good standard of living there as an academic, but in the UK you either need to progress well up the tree or be very passionate about the subject. In the UK it doesn't seem to be at the same institution, though, as kids seem to try to find a university to go to well away from prying parents and stay there. Many of my old professors from my undergraduate degree seemed to have children that were also academics. Less so the younger lecturers, but then their kids weren't old enough.

There are plenty of families of doctors in the UK, though, and entire families of teachers 30 years ago seemed to be pretty common.

 

But surely a GP can't get his or her son preference at medical college can they? Or am I missing something?

Surely doctors' children are doctors children in the same way that Stuart Broad, Simon Jones, Jonny Bairstow are England cricket players whose fathers played cricket for England?  A mixture of genes and family encouragement.  I would guess if they had been taken away from their parents at birth and been brought by up by pro baseball players they would now be playing baseball professionally.

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But surely a GP can't get his or her son preference at medical college can they? Or am I missing something?

Surely doctors' children are doctors children in the same way that Stuart Broad, Simon Jones, Jonny Bairstow are England cricket players whose fathers played cricket for England?  A mixture of genes and family encouragement.  I would guess if they had been taken away from their parents at birth and been brought by up by pro baseball players they would now be playing baseball professionally.

Have you seen what the competition is to get into a British medical school? How do you think they winnow down the list of candidates?

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Have you seen what the competition is to get into a British medical school? How do you think they winnow down the list of candidates?

I was hoping on A level grades.  It would be awful if they think "Smith, Newton Abbot - my friend Smith is a GP there - is that his son - I will give him a place."  I would expect that sooner or later someone would notice that and it get caught.

Edited by iamnumerate
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Foreign aid should be indexed to education and family planning. Look at average ages of childbirth in these developing countries.

https://data.unicef.org/topic/child-health/adolescent-health/

Until women are free to be educated and attain employment instead of being socialised into baby farming they cannot escape the poverty cycle.

 

More babies = more starving children = more Aid.

Id add that we never gave foreign aid to China, South Korea, Taiwan, etc.

European - as in mainland European aid seems to more of a sop to having a closed agri-sector, and area where MEA countries could add value via trade.

Subbing a French farmer handrolling Cheese at a sub of ~80k/y results in the high tariffs for ME and African producers.

 

 

 

 

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But surely a GP can't get his or her son preference at medical college can they? Or am I missing something?

Surely doctors' children are doctors children in the same way that Stuart Broad, Simon Jones, Jonny Bairstow are England cricket players whose fathers played cricket for England?  A mixture of genes and family encouragement.  I would guess if they had been taken away from their parents at birth and been brought by up by pro baseball players they would now be playing baseball professionally.

GP/NHS recruitment./training is one of the few UK areas where theres a level 'help' rather than out n out corruption.

Separately, the whole BMA setting the number of medical school entrants is bent.

 

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More babies = more starving children = more Aid.

Id add that we never gave foreign aid to China, South Korea, Taiwan, etc.

European - as in mainland European aid seems to more of a sop to having a closed agri-sector, and area where MEA countries could add value via trade.

Subbing a French farmer handrolling Cheese at a sub of ~80k/y results in the high tariffs for ME and African producers.

Poor African producers have zero tariffs for agricultural products into the EU.

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I was hoping on A level grades.  It would be awful if they think "Smith, Newton Abbot - my friend Smith is a GP there - is that his son - I will give him a place."  I would expect that sooner or later someone would notice that and it get caught.

I'd be surprised if A level grades give the resolution these days considering the limited places and competition and the seeming desire to award everyone the highest grade.

Selection is probably more made at the entrance exam level.

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Poor African producers have zero tariffs for agricultural products into the EU.

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45342607

There is an arrangement that covers other developing countries beyond the LDCs. It's known as the Generalised System of Preferences (GSP). Other rich countries, including the US and Japan operate their own GSPs.

The EU's version applies to Nigeria and has benefited Kenya but does not cover South Africa.

It doesn't open the tariff-free gates as wide as EBA does. The EU says it gives tariff-free access for 57% of products and reduced rates for most of the rest. But the minority of goods still subject to full tariffs are often farm produce.

Yeah, If a country is too poor to get low tariffs then its too poor to develop its economy.

They need to offer low to zero tariffs to *all* African countries.

Countries have developed roughly - subsidence/family farms -> industry -> services.

Europe kills that first transition.

 

 

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I was hoping on A level grades.  It would be awful if they think "Smith, Newton Abbot - my friend Smith is a GP there - is that his son - I will give him a place."  I would expect that sooner or later someone would notice that and it get caught.

Of course it's not A-Level grades. Everyone who applies will be a high achiever with similar high grades, similar to the competition for Oxbridge entry.

Medical schools require a medical aptitude test to be taken and I presume some amount of one-to-one coaching from a qualified medical practitioner would be an advantage for this.

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45342607

There is an arrangement that covers other developing countries beyond the LDCs. It's known as the Generalised System of Preferences (GSP). Other rich countries, including the US and Japan operate their own GSPs.

The EU's version applies to Nigeria and has benefited Kenya but does not cover South Africa.

It doesn't open the tariff-free gates as wide as EBA does. The EU says it gives tariff-free access for 57% of products and reduced rates for most of the rest. But the minority of goods still subject to full tariffs are often farm produce.

Yeah, If a country is too poor to get low tariffs then its too poor to develop its economy.

There's a difference between the minority of goods subject to tariff often being farm produce and the majority of farm produce by value having tariffs applied.

As an illustration, the UK now has tariff-free access to Japanese markets for things it doesn't produce or does not export to Japan, the reverse situation.

 

They need to offer low to zero tariffs to *all* African countries.

Why all?

 

Edited by NobodyInParticular
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My friend, a German university lecturer who taught in the UK for a decade told me that the structures are very different. In the UK, you move up the ranks as you get more experience. In Germany, numbers are strictly limited, and the only way to move up the upper ranks is if people die....also, after about 7 years or so, you will be booted out and have to find work elsewhere.

He works in media studies ... and I think he said there are 70+ media studies departments in the Uk, vs around 17 in Germany. 

 

 

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There's a different between the minority of goods subject to tariff often being farm produce and the majority of farm produce by value having tariffs applied.

As an illustration, the UK now has tariff-free access to Japanese markets for things it doesn't produce or does not export to Japan, the reverse situation.

Why all?

 

No, the good subject to tariffs ae farm produce.

Hand craft African tat art is probably traded on zilch tariff.

Because African has a lot of agricultural land; Europe doesnt.

Blocking African argi trade would be like forcing Germans to work in tourist and service industry rather than making cars and manufactured goods.

 

 

 

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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-45342607

There is an arrangement that covers other developing countries beyond the LDCs. It's known as the Generalised System of Preferences (GSP). Other rich countries, including the US and Japan operate their own GSPs.

The EU's version applies to Nigeria and has benefited Kenya but does not cover South Africa.

It doesn't open the tariff-free gates as wide as EBA does. The EU says it gives tariff-free access for 57% of products and reduced rates for most of the rest. But the minority of goods still subject to full tariffs are often farm produce.

Yeah, If a country is too poor to get low tariffs then its too poor to develop its economy.

They need to offer low to zero tariffs to *all* African countries.

Countries have developed roughly - subsidence/family farms -> industry -> services.

Europe kills that first transition.

 

 

from your link:

 

If it's not a weapon or ammunition, and it is made or grown in one of the countries concerned, it has duty-free access to the EU. If the product is from Ethiopia, Uganda or Malawi, for example, there would be no tariffs.

 
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No, the good subject to tariffs ae farm produce.

Hand craft African tat art is probably traded on zilch tariff.

Because African has a lot of agricultural land; Europe doesnt.

Blocking African argi trade would be like forcing Germans to work in tourist and service industry rather than making cars and manufactured goods.

from your link:

If it's not a weapon or ammunition, and it is made or grown in one of the countries concerned, it has duty-free access to the EU. If the product is from Ethiopia, Uganda or Malawi, for example, there would be no tariffs.

Is 'tat' grown or manufactured?
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from your link:

 

If it's not a weapon or ammunition, and it is made or grown in one of the countries concerned, it has duty-free access to the EU. If the product is from Ethiopia, Uganda or Malawi, for example, there would be no tariffs.

 

All failing countries.

They need to trade with African countries that are not on their knees.

 

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Of course it's not A-Level grades. Everyone who applies will be a high achiever with similar high grades, similar to the competition for Oxbridge entry.

Medical schools require a medical aptitude test to be taken and I presume some amount of one-to-one coaching from a qualified medical practitioner would be an advantage for this.

True the same as with Stuart Broad etc getting batting advice from their parents.  However it is not the same as nepotism.  (I do often see adverts by the way to coach children for Oxbridge or Medical school entry).

 

 

GP/NHS recruitment./training is one of the few UK areas where theres a level 'help' rather than out n out corruption.

Separately, the whole BMA setting the number of medical school entrants is bent.

 

The BMA is probably the world's best trade union.

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My friend, a German university lecturer who taught in the UK for a decade told me that the structures are very different. In the UK, you move up the ranks as you get more experience. In Germany, numbers are strictly limited, and the only way to move up the upper ranks is if people die....also, after about 7 years or so, you will be booted out and have to find work elsewhere.

He works in media studies ... and I think he said there are 70+ media studies departments in the Uk, vs around 17 in Germany. 

 

 

The Dead men's shoes phenomena is common on the continent. An italian professor told me that it lead to apathy over achieving very much. The UK focuses on measurables like research grants or outputs much more in promotion cases.

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The Dead men's shoes phenomena is common on the continent. An italian professor told me that it lead to apathy over achieving very much. The UK focuses on measurables like research grants or outputs much more in promotion cases.

At a slight tangent, do you think we will have large  job losses in the education sector?

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At a slight tangent, do you think we will have large  job losses in the education sector?

Perhaps in the arts, or other schools that do not make any money really. Higher education is changing its nature very rapidly at the moment. To answer your question -i am amazed by many things eg how it still retains deadwood so well at the same time as pissing off the talented. I honestly find it hard to predict where it will end up. Except it will move further towards entertainment than education. The real question is were will students get jobs and will universities remain worthwhile or necessary to achieve that. If it is any answer, i am very relieved my children do not want to be academics. i managed to get high up the system but now hate it. So well paid but very cynical, some of the young people i deal with are brilliant and marvellous, just about the only thing that keeps me going.

Edited by debtlessmanc
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Perhaps in the arts, or other schools that do not make any money really. Higher education is changing its nature very rapidly at the moment. Wrt your question i am amazed by many things eg how it still retains deadwood so well at the same time as pissing off the talented. I honestly find it hard to predict where it will end up. Except it will move further towards entertaiment than education. The real question is were will students get jobs and will universities remain worthwhile or necessary to that. If it is any answer, i am very relieved my childrens do not want to be academics. i managed to get high up the system but now hate it. So well paid but very cynical,sone of the young people i deal with are brilliant and marvellous, just about the only thing that keeps me going.

The work environment was shrinking before Covid 19, the future is uncertain, i do think we will have 5 million unemployed very soon. 

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