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Mass changes to UK immigration requirements


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erm....isn't that Globalisation?

Globalisation isnt really a thing, despite what the MBAs might say.

Theres gormless f-wittery of trying to chase ever cheaper labour. and longer supply chains.

This blew up when China entered the WTO, who's idea of trade was more IP theft.

Having trade at regional level is fine, exploiting arbitrage.

 

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Globalisation isnt really a thing, despite what the MBAs might say.

 

erm...you might want to tell that to the 52% 'will of the people' brigade

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/globalisation-poll-low-wages-inequality-technology-comres-a7467491.html

 

Brexit Britain turns against globalisation, blaming it for low UK wages and inequality poll reveals

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erm...you might want to tell that to the 52% 'will of the people' brigade

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/globalisation-poll-low-wages-inequality-technology-comres-a7467491.html

 

Brexit Britain turns against globalisation, blaming it for low UK wages and inequality poll reveals

Its the Independent. Its not reporting what its been told. Spinning

The lower ~50% are quite rightly laying the blame at the fall in living standards at the 15m-20m mainly low skllled, benefit dependent migrants who've rocked up in the UK in the last 20 years. First Labours let new voters in, followed by the millions of EEers.

 

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Its the Independent. Its not reporting what its been told. Spinning

The lower ~50% are quite rightly laying the blame at the fall in living standards at the 15m-20m mainly low skllled, benefit dependent migrants who've rocked up in the UK in the last 20 years. First Labours let new voters in, followed by the millions of EEers.

 

Oh come on, I expected more.  I can dig up similar articles from the Guardian, Express, F*rage's ramblings, and any number of b*t shit crazy right wing sites - are they all spinning to the same conspiracy?  To serve the 6ft Lizards?

The elites wanted Globalisation as it offshored costs, regulatory burden, and tax liabilities.  The masses were sold Globalisation on cheap tat and benefit bungs (Tax credits?).

I heard the same argument about 'immigrants coming over the last 20 years' in the 80s.

 

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Its the Independent. Its not reporting what its been told. Spinning

The lower ~50% are quite rightly laying the blame at the fall in living standards at the 15m-20m mainly low skllled, benefit dependent migrants who've rocked up in the UK in the last 20 years. First Labours let new voters in, followed by the millions of EEers.

 

Obviously if someone can get off a plane and get a nice home then it is not available to others.

I remember reading in Cronica Latina (a new defunct free Spanish language newspaper) an advert in IIRC in 99 about how if you are going back to South America take advantage of RTB your council house.

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More Poof!

Hungary and Poland stand firm against EU rule of law conditions

Both feel unfairly targeted, while febrile domestic politics constrain Warsaw’s room for manoeuvre

https://www.ft.com/content/6868477d-38a2-464e-b1c4-188fd0a62b1a



At the heart of the dispute is a mechanism that would allow the EU to suspend funding to member states where its values, including judicial independence, have been undermined or are under threat.

Proponents see the mechanism as a way for the bloc to protect EU funds in recalcitrant member states, something it has long struggled to do via its existing tools.

But Hungary and Poland, both of which have been the subject of the bloc’s existing disciplinary proceedings over the rule of law, regard the new rules as a politically motivated attempt to target them. “I think today ‘rule of law’ is everything and anything that you don’t like about Hungary,” Judit Varga, Hungary’s justice minister, said on a call with foreign journalists on Monday evening. She added that it was “unfair” to tie funding to the rule of law as each EU state had a different judicial system, and there was no common definition of the rule of law.

 

Comments are fun.

Well they can hand back cohesion development funds plus interest minus any net budget contributions and goose step east toward Belarus and the eternal leader of the Russian autocracy.

But they won’t. They will remain in a club that can’t expel them and continue to exercise their rights of veto. 

What part of “democracy and the rule of law are prerequisites for EU membership” do these two governments not understand?

What part of "rule of law is not defined anywhere" do you not understand?

They would argue they do have rule of law . . . Just not the kind the eu likes.

EU taxpayer funds should not be used for kleptocracy dictatorships. Trump has shown how eat it is for a dictator to bend the system even in a supposedly strong democracy. The EU does not need Hungary or Poland and should not hesitate to cut off funding until democracy and independent judiciary are restored. 

Errm. Poland was voted on a basis of democracy. Are you a pro-EU bot or something? Or just cannot accept a government with different values to yours / EUs?

 

Can I ask, could the rule of law measures be used:
- against Spain, for its refusal to allow Catalan politicians advocate independence
- against France, for its constant breach of the EU caps on budget deficits and public debt 
- against Italy for the same and for misspending some EU funds
- against Malta, for covering up the murder of an anti corruption journalist....?
 
And who should be the arbiter of this?
 
Once again, we see the logic of the single currency expose the institutional weakness of the EU:
- the single currency requires fiscal transfers 
- fiscal transfers are only politically acceptable if taxpayers of contributing nations think the money will be wisely spent
and therefore the Euro requires the EU to federalise ie the tax raising and spending needs to be overseen by elected EU politicians.
 
This naturally would require 27 referenda and will therefore never happen, except in small steps and without the consent of the people.

More wringing hands  EU-f-wittery

Opinion European Union

Corruption is rotting the periphery of Europe

The continent’s problems extend to troubled democracies beyond Hungary and Poland



Hungary and Poland are in the spotlight as their governments resist efforts to link EU funding to respect for the rule of law. But focusing exclusively on the Hungarians and Poles underplays the scope of Europe’s problem. In several other EU countries, recent corruption scandals and rule of law controversies have raised serious questions about the health of their democratic systems. They include Bulgaria, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Malta and Cyprus. Collectively, the troubled democracies account for between one-quarter and one-third of the 27 governments seated around the EU conference table.

All new members. All too bent to have be allowed full membership so soon. All have been even more bent by joining the EU.

All major exporters of in-work benefit takers in the UK.

And missing some old members - Spain (after the mess of handling the Catalonia episode) probably Portugal too. And most of italy.

 

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More wringing hands  EU-f-wittery

Opinion European Union

Corruption is rotting the periphery of Europe

The continent’s problems extend to troubled democracies beyond Hungary and Poland



Hungary and Poland are in the spotlight as their governments resist efforts to link EU funding to respect for the rule of law. But focusing exclusively on the Hungarians and Poles underplays the scope of Europe’s problem. In several other EU countries, recent corruption scandals and rule of law controversies have raised serious questions about the health of their democratic systems. They include Bulgaria, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Malta and Cyprus. Collectively, the troubled democracies account for between one-quarter and one-third of the 27 governments seated around the EU conference table.

All new members. All too bent to have be allowed full membership so soon. All have been even more bent by joining the EU.

All major exporters of in-work benefit takers in the UK.

And missing some old members - Spain (after the mess of handling the Catalonia episode) probably Portugal too. And most of italy.

 

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Cyprus is the leadind seller of EU citizenship for cash i believe. I had postgrad student from cyprus who had loads of problems, but was a bit thick mainly, he was a Cambridge grad but it was  always a mystery how.  One classic occurance, in late 2013 we asked if the run on the banks had been a problem, his quote "has their been a problem with the banks? i had'nt heard". The next day he came in and said, "i spoke to my dad, he works for the bank of Cyprus, yes you are right there was in March!". We later parted by mutual consent, i then received a reference request for him from the Bank of Cyprus for some senior position, i believe he got it. Guy could barely add up. I was left wondering about the Cambridge degree, i wonder if the college got a new swimming pool. Why the EU thinks propping this kind of stuff up is okay i have no idea. The UK is one of the better countries in this regard, our departure shifts the balance in the EU away from healthy.

 

After a while we came to a mutual agreement that he should leavd

Edited by debtlessmanc
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Cyprus is the leadind seller of EU citizenship for cash i believe. I had postgrad student from cyprus who had loads of problems, but was a bit thick mainly, he was a Cambridge grad but it was  always a mystery how.  One classic occurance, in late 2013 we asked if the run on the banks had been a problem, his quote "has their been a problem with the banks? i had'nt heard". The next day he came in and said, "i spoke to my dad, he works for the bank of Cyprus, yes you are right there was in March!". We later parted by mutual consent, i then received a reference request for him from the Bank of Cyprus for some senior position, i believe he got it. Guy could barely add up. I was left wondering about the Cambridge degree, i wonder if the college got a new swimming pool. Why the EU thinks propping this kind of stuff up is okay i have no idea. The UK is one of the better countries in this regard, our departure shifts the balance in the EU away from healthy.

 

After a while we came to a mutual agreement that he should leavd

You cannot use this as an example of EU incompetence, we probably have more cases of promotions and advancement due to family connections 

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You cannot use this as an example of EU incompetence, we probably have more cases of promotions and advancement due to family connections 

https://theconversation.com/study-italian-university-nepotism-is-endemic-2680

i have never met an academic in the UK who has a close blood relative who is also an academic. Some italian schools have 5 or 6 professors from the same family. This one reason why the UK has so many italian academics working in its system. If you talk to them they are usually quite open about it. They had to leave to get a job elsewhere as all the jobs in their department were going to friends/relatives of the head of Department. I am told it is getting a bit better, but it is still a long way from Northern European standards.

Edited by debtlessmanc
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https://theconversation.com/study-italian-university-nepotism-is-endemic-2680

i have never met an academic in the UK who has a close blood relative who is also an academic. Some italian schools have 5 or 6 professors from the same family. This one reason why the UK has so many italian academics working in its system. If you talk to them they are usually quite open about it. They had to leave to get a job elsewhere as all the jobs in their department were going to friends/relatives of the head of Department. I am told it is getting a bit better, but it is still a long way from Northern European standards.

That may be true in the academic area where people need to be a bit intelligent and are lowly paid, to advance in the UK the old boy network, going to the right university, family connections are still very important.

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That may be true in the academic area where people need to be a bit intelligent and are lowly paid, to advance in the UK the old boy network, going to the right university, family connections are still very important.

Above a certain level i agree, indeed a recently migrated into UK Pakistani Taxi driver said exactly that when i got in  a conversation  with him once (Taxi drivers always interesting to talk to). "In the UK when you reach a high level it is all corruption, but below that it is pretty much a meritocracy, in my country every single level, indeed every single damn thing is corruption"

My Father was born into a working class family in the north, he got to Grammar school and then red brick university. He got a job working for RTZ who bought a piece of land and built a tin smelter in the 50's my Father and two other engineers designed and ran the smelter which produced 10% of the world's tin, billions of pounds worth over its lifetime. He rapidly rose to 2nd in control. However for 30 years after that the MD was always some guy parachuted into from RTZ head office who was married to some lord or others daughter. It was my Dad's and his mates main job to stop these nutters (on 10 times their wages) ruining labour relations saying stupid things to the union or trying to implement impractical work practices. Time and again my father and two others actually ran the place watched as some upper class twit from London got the credit and money. He took it with good grace, after all he was earning many times what his signalman father ever did. Thats the UK for you

Just imagine if my Fathers career paths was also impossible for hard working gifted people, that is most other countries.

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Above a certain level i agree, indeed a recently migrated into UK Pakistani Taxi driver said exactly that when i got in  a conversation  with him once (Taxi drivers always interesting to talk to). "In the UK when you reach a high level it is all corruption, but below that it is pretty much a meritocracy, in my country every single level, indeed every single damn thing is corruption"

My Father was born into a working class family in the north, he got to Grammar school and then red brick university. He got a job working for RTZ who bought a piece of land and built a tin smelter in the 50's my Father and two other engineers designed and ran the smelter which produced 10% of the world's tin, billions of pounds worth over its lifetime. He rapidly rose to 2nd in control. However for 30 years after that the MD was always some guy parachuted into from RTZ head office who was married to some lord or others daughter. It was my Dad's and his mates main job to stop these nutters (on 10 times their wages) ruining labour relations saying stupid things to the union or trying to implement impractical work practices. Time and again my father and two others actually ran the place watched as some upper class twit from London got the credit and money. He took it with good grace, after all he was earning many times what his signalman father ever did. Thats the UK for you

Just imagine if my Fathers career paths was also impossible for hard working gifted people, that is most other countries.

We are becoming very corrupt if you read the media or we have always been corrupt and the internet is bringing this information into the public domain 

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That may be true in the academic area where people need to be a bit intelligent and are lowly paid, to advance in the UK the old boy network, going to the right university, family connections are still very important.

Going ahead, I'm not sure.

The only areas where I can think of posh thick people was finances and law.

The finsec has US banks, operating on meritocracy, burn thru the thickos. Then technology, then regulation and reduction of leverage.

By 2000 there were few posties left anywhere buy Lloyd's insurance.

Laws just full of bullshitters. Too many people fighting over too little money now.

 

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What dont you thing the UK is?

Corrupt andor cliquey

The UK is getting more and more transparent and accountable.

As mentioned my debtless above, there is a reason why continental Europeans are pouring into the UK - its not our weather.

Stuff like UEWO

There's more the UK can do, and should not stand still esp opaque corporate structures.

But compared to mainland Europe which, apart from Northern and Scandi bits, appears to be going backwards.

 

 

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Corrupt andor cliquey

The UK is getting more and more transparent and accountable.

As mentioned my debtless above, there is a reason why continental Europeans are pouring into the UK - its not our weather.

Stuff like UEWO

There's more the UK can do, and should not stand still esp opaque corporate structures.

But compared to mainland Europe which, apart from Northern and Scandi bits, appears to be going backwards.

 

 

It is the big lump sum, you get after you sell your London property after paying your 25 years mortgage 

I have a Turkish friend his father has just retired at 55ish with a flat in dalston worth £500k and a bus drivers pension, a comparable Turk working in Germany for BMW can only expect a pension of maybe £100-200 per week, 

I met an Italian hottie 26 years old who wants to be my friend as she want knowledge on how to get on the property ladder, no experiences were offered so I decided not to be her friend 

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It is the big lump sum, you get after you sell your London property after paying your 25 years mortgage 

I have a Turkish friend his father has just retired at 55ish with a flat in dalston worth £500k and a bus drivers pension, a comparable Turk working in Germany for BMW can only expect a pension of maybe £100-200 per week, 

I met an Italian hottie 26 years old who wants to be my friend as she want knowledge on how to get on the property ladder, no experiences were offered so I decided not to be her friend 

Thats an issue with the gormless UK welfare and migration systems.

Both need gutting.

I doubt the Euers piling into new build London property since 2010, a lot 'subbed' - see earlier -are going to have the same outcome.

 

 

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More wringing hands  EU-f-wittery

Opinion European Union

Corruption is rotting the periphery of Europe

The continent’s problems extend to troubled democracies beyond Hungary and Poland



Hungary and Poland are in the spotlight as their governments resist efforts to link EU funding to respect for the rule of law. But focusing exclusively on the Hungarians and Poles underplays the scope of Europe’s problem. In several other EU countries, recent corruption scandals and rule of law controversies have raised serious questions about the health of their democratic systems. They include Bulgaria, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia, Malta and Cyprus. Collectively, the troubled democracies account for between one-quarter and one-third of the 27 governments seated around the EU conference table.

All new members. All too bent to have be allowed full membership so soon. All have been even more bent by joining the EU.

All major exporters of in-work benefit takers in the UK.

And missing some old members - Spain (after the mess of handling the Catalonia episode) probably Portugal too. And most of italy.

 

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The EU seems to care more about the fact that Poland and Hungary don't want Muslim immigrants than corruption - very weird

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Thats an issue with the gormless UK welfare and migration systems.

Both need gutting.

I doubt the Euers piling into new build London property since 2010, a lot 'subbed' - see earlier -are going to have the same outcome.

 

 

Did you never hear the story of Dick Whittington, telling the poor  indians/pakistanis/turks/nigerians/polish that the streets of London are paved with gold, all you need is a self certifying mortgage, that can be purchased at a price.

dick_whittington.jpg.jpg?itok=yGzRzXI3

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Flipping this around, which countries does the money flow to?

I actually lived in India for 6 weeks on a business project and I did not come across corruption at all, according to the media everyone was on the take, but things worked I found the country too boring but not corrupt 

Edited by shlomo
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Flipping this around, which countries does the money flow to?

I actually lived in India for 6 weeks on a business project and I did not come across corruption at all, according to the media everyone was on the take, but things worked I found the country too boring but not corrupt 

India is so corrupt its like breathing the air.

Indias score and rank reflect that.

Imagine if the foreign aid budget was tied to high TI scores.

 

 

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