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If properties are required by Govs to reduce carbon & energy use like cars, what happens ?


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Following the recent Gov announcing petrol, diesel & hybrid car ban by 2035

According to the Construction Climate Challenge report, the construction sector is responsible for up to 50% of climate change, 40% of energy usage and 50% of landfill waste.

I wondered what would happen to the property market if the Gov make a similar announcement to reduce their emmisions by a similar date ?  

Presumably, new built houses would have to approach passive house standards and existing buildings, 80% of which are predicted to still be standing by 2050, need to be deep energy retrofitted which costs a fortune.

Rock and a hard place .

Furthermore, given increased flooding and more frequent extreme storms, existing properties need to be improved to become resilient buildings 

 

Edited by Saving For a Space Ship
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1 hour ago, Saving For a Space Ship said:

Following the recent Gov announcing petrol, diesel & hybrid car ban by 2035

According to the Construction Climate Challenge report, the construction sector is responsible for up to 50% of climate change, 40% of energy usage and 50% of landfill waste.

I wondered what would happen to the property market if the Gov make a similar announcement to reduce their emmisions by a similar date ?  

Presumably, new built houses would have to approach passive house standards and existing buildings, 80% of which are predicted to still be standing by 2050, need to be deep energy retrofitted which costs a fortune.

Rock and a hard place .

Furthermore, given increased flooding and more frequent extreme storms, existing properties need to be improved to become resilient buildings 

 

It's a huge investment but one that in London at least pays off.

We have refurbed two houses along these lines, the cost is huge but you have to see it as making a old house fit for the next 100yrs.

At a minimum it includes external (cavity and internal  doesn't work well enough in practice) wall insulation, roof insulation, underfloor heating/insulation, new windows new boiler/water system, solar panels and low energy lighting.  Once you have decided to do all this work,  it makes sense to rewire, put in a new kitchen, probably add new bathrooms and extend if you have space.

The first one a three bed terrace cost over £100,000 back in 2,000. In terms of payback, the energy bill dropped by over 70% saving around £900 a year the house was much more pleasant to live in and we got the money back when we sold in 2012.   

 

    

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Apparently behind transport and agriculture the concrete industry is the largest producer of carbon, producing 8% of the world's carbon. And there is no proposed method of reducing the carbon produced in the production of concrete. 

4 hours ago, Saving For a Space Ship said:

Furthermore, given increased flooding and more frequent extreme storms, existing properties need to be improved to become resilient buildings 

Most older buildings are 'resilient' , ive lost a few tiles in the last 15 years but nothing more from a 60s brick built ex council house. Some timber construction new builds in this area have literally had the sides torn off by storms. My sister in Law lives in Gloucester where they have had bad flooding and again a brick construction house survives flooding far better than modern timber construction house lined in plasterboard. 

Reading that resilient houses page they seem to be more for extreme living conditions like the outback, they talk about hurricane resilience and 'methods of communication to warn Neighbours of impending threats'... If I need to warn my Neighbour about something i normally just catch her at the side door when she is having a fag. 

Edited by regprentice
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27 minutes ago, regprentice said:

Apparently behind transport and agriculture the concrete industry is the largest producer of carbon, producing 8% of the world's carbon. And there is no proposed method of reducing the carbon produced in the production of concrete. 

Most older buildings are 'resilient' , ive lost a few tiles in the last 15 years but nothing more from a 60s brick built ex council house. Some timber construction new builds in this area have literally had the sides torn off by storms. My sister in Law lives in Gloucester where they have had bad flooding and again a brick construction house survives flooding far better than modern timber construction house lined in plasterboard. 

Reading that resilient houses page they seem to be more for extreme living conditions like the outback, they talk about hurricane resilience and 'methods of communication to warn Neighbours of impending threats'... If I need to warn my Neighbour about something i normally just catch her at the side door when she is having a fag. 

There is but it will take a hefty Carbon tax to make people switch to it.

A concrete step toward net-zero carbon emissions in cement production

New builds are built from the cheapest possible materials so that the likes of Persimmon can achieve a +30% margin. There are far better building materials and construction methods that could be used but they would add 5-10% to cost and reduce the margin for shareholders.

If I was building my own house today, I would use MGO SIPS, they are about 10% more expensive than the Timber/Plasterboard construction used in new builds but miles ahead in terms of performance and incredibly strong/resilient.

https://www.ecoenvelope.co.uk/  

 

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On 08/02/2020 at 13:59, Confusion of VIs said:

There is but it will take a hefty Carbon tax to make people switch to it.

A concrete step toward net-zero carbon emissions in cement production

New builds are built from the cheapest possible materials so that the likes of Persimmon can achieve a +30% margin. There are far better building materials and construction methods that could be used but they would add 5-10% to cost and reduce the margin for shareholders.

If I was building my own house today, I would use MGO SIPS, they are about 10% more expensive than the Timber/Plasterboard construction used in new builds but miles ahead in terms of performance and incredibly strong/resilient.

https://www.ecoenvelope.co.uk/  

 

I agree with the MGO SIPS, but they have to come all the way from China with a big carbon footprint.

Is there a more locally made alternative ?

From my research with MMC / modular buildings, I know the manufacturers avoided mgo board for many yrs due to Chinese factory quality issues.

Are these now solved ?   

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  • 416 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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