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Hands up who never saw this coming... 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2020/01/16/banks-crack-lending-fears-dangerous-debt-bubble/?WT.mc_id=tmg_share_tw

Banks crack down on lending over fears of a dangerous debt bubble

 

Should read.... Causer of dangerous debt bubble realise the have ####ed up again. 

 

 

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10 hours ago, TheCountOfNowhere said:

Hands up who never saw this coming... 

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/business/2020/01/16/banks-crack-lending-fears-dangerous-debt-bubble/?WT.mc_id=tmg_share_tw

Banks crack down on lending over fears of a dangerous debt bubble

 

Should read.... Causer of dangerous debt bubble realise the have ####ed up again. 

 

 

But then the Telegraph article says:

The figures will intensify speculation that an interest rate cut is needed to boost the flagging economy.

Which will have the opposite effect.

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I think some muddled thinking here.  It is not clear what the problem is in their view?  Is the problem that debt is too high and in a bubble or is the problem that lending is being cracked down on?  Given that their solution is to lower interest rates it appears that it is the latter.

Noticeable also that the go to solution /crack down is on business lending, not lending into housing.

Summary - it is rotten and it stinks.

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7 minutes ago, Wayward said:

I think some muddled thinking here.  It is not clear what the problem is in their view?  Is the problem that debt is too high and in a bubble or is the problem that lending is being cracked down on?  Given that their solution is to lower interest rates it appears that it is the latter.

Noticeable also that the go to solution /crack down is on business lending, not lending into housing.

Summary - it is rotten and it stinks.

It is bizarre. If you're worried people are borrowing too much money then you raise interest rates, surely.

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4 hours ago, onlooker said:

But then the Telegraph article says:

The figures will intensify speculation that an interest rate cut is needed to boost the flagging economy.

Which will have the opposite effect.

Bizarre times and strange 'there is no alternative' groupthink when it comes to economics leads to weird, irrational results such as this.

What we need is the factories back and a return to mass production of our own consumer goods.

But - as with the USA - that ain't gonna happen, tariffs or no tariffs.

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11 hours ago, onlooker said:

But then the Telegraph article says:

The figures will intensify speculation that an interest rate cut is needed to boost the flagging economy.

Which will have the opposite effect.

I find it hard to believe people that say that actually care about the economy. An "open lie" I might call it, in which the lack of logic is obvious but easily disguised as a matter of opinion.

I suppose it's like if you have an unfit obese person, push them to go for a light walk, not too much strain, much like a rate rise. They can't do that? Try a few stretches while sat down, like a small rate rise. Can't do that? Maybe some breathing exercises? Can't do that? O.K. just sit down all day and get worse until it's too late and any kind of exertion might cause an accident, then make the argument that any kind of exertion is bad for you, ergo any interest rate rises are bad.

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9 hours ago, Arpeggio said:

I find it hard to believe people that say that actually care about the economy. An "open lie" I might call it, in which the lack of logic is obvious but easily disguised as a matter of opinion.

I suppose it's like if you have an unfit obese person, push them to go for a light walk, not too much strain, much like a rate rise. They can't do that? Try a few stretches while sat down, like a small rate rise. Can't do that? Maybe some breathing exercises? Can't do that? O.K. just sit down all day and get worse until it's too late and any kind of exertion might cause an accident, then make the argument that any kind of exertion is bad for you, ergo any interest rate rises are bad.

+1

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20 hours ago, Si1 said:

It is bizarre. If you're worried people are borrowing too much money then you raise interest rates, surely.

Look, there are some very clever people being paid lots of money to explain to us dumb hicks that the solution to too much debt is lower interest rates, please stop contradicting them as you're making everybody uncomfortable.

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https://m.republicworld.com/world-news/rest-of-the-world-news/imf-chief-warns-return-of-great-depression-driven-by-inequality.html

 

Interestingly, Christine Lagarde (friend of Gordon Brown, George Osborne, Mark Carney) has been out of the IMF job a matter of months and her predecessor is already calling out the mess that's been made

"IMF chief warns return of Great Depression driven by inequality & fin sector instability

Kristalina Georgieva, head of the International Monetary Fund stated that the present global economy showed risks of a return of the Great Depression."

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  • 418 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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