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Landlord David Wright rented his four-bedroom property in Warrington, Manchester, to a mother and her two teenage sons before he was forced to turn to lawyers to gain access to the house. 

Mr Wright has spent £2,000 on clearing the property of rubbish and waste, and faces a bill totalling thousands of pounds to repair the damage.

He has also been left with rent arrears of around £29,000 which he is unlikely to recoup.

I won't be renting again after this, once the repairs are completed, I'll be selling it.'

Daily Mail

 

 

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That's why landlord insurance exists. I'm sure if there was egregious damage by the tenant it would be a valid claim.

This bit makes no sense to me though

I knew that her rent was in arrears, but I didn't realise how much money was outstanding.[/quote]

Surely you'd be aware the first time the rent payment was late or short? Even if you were an easygoing sort of person who lets things slide occasionally so long as they make it up, you'd know roughly how much you're owed.

Edited by Diver Dan

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10 hours ago, Diver Dan said:

That's why landlord insurance exists. I'm sure if there was egregious damage by the tenant it would be a valid claim.

This bit makes no sense to me though

 

He has lots of money, so it was a small part of his income 

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10 hours ago, Si1 said:

Business risk

Quite.... nobody is forced to go into business renting out property, if it was that easy and profitable everyone would be doing it....Many are being paid good money to live in and look after other people's spare property....😉

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I always say that landlords usually get the tenants they deserve. How many families looked at that property but turned it down because they knew they couldn't afford to pay the rent?

The people who ended up moving in probably had little or no intention of paying reliably but short-termist landlords such as the one in the OP just want the maximum possible yield regardless of any other factors.

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16 hours ago, Aidan Ap Word said:

Maybe he should have sold it in the first place?

Chose not to and decide to exploit someone...

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£2K clean-up costs? Him and some mates over a weekend with some rubber gloves, some hot water, some bicarb and vinegar, some paint, some bin bags...maybe a skip-hire...all costs £2,000?? He must have used a cleaning company. He didn't need to do that. I haven't got any sympathy.

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15 hours ago, EnglishinWales said:

£2K clean-up costs? Him and some mates over a weekend with some rubber gloves, some hot water, some bicarb and vinegar, some paint, some bin bags...maybe a skip-hire...all costs £2,000?? He must have used a cleaning company. He didn't need to do that. I haven't got any sympathy.

Waste removal nowadays is a complete joke in terms of costs.

A few years ago a tenant left a place of mine and left a lot of heavy furniture eg sofa, beds, mattresses etc. This was a property I bought with existing tenants In and they weren’t happy with letting agent or previous landlord and didn’t want a new landlord and made things a tricky as possible.
I think my lack of judgement on them plus my willingness to help them stay (or go) just aggravated them more...probably in the scheme of things too little too late.  

I used the previous letting agent manager at the time who needed receipts (the tenant insisted on receipts from the bond from a ‘proper firm’). I offered to clear it with a few trips to the tip and the dirty wet mattress x2  was to be left for the bin men (who charge)....I said £100 the lot and the council was £45 of that. 

Tenant refused and wanted a full receipt. Firm came in and removed the beds, wardrobe, mattresses and sofa for £550. Cheapest firm by far. 

I told the agent that they must absolutely warn tenants to remove things because the costs now are really high. Even ringing the council and leaving out for the bin men would have been better at around £240. It is cheaper to remove asbestos (if bagged) than mattresses. And often plaster board is cheaper to buy than dispose of. 
 

Ps I take your point by the way and don’t disagree....so my comments are a tad off thread. But only to make sure we all advise anyone leaving a place to make sure they do their very best to clear it particularly of big stuff. 

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On 07/11/2019 at 13:00, Sawitcoming said:

29k of arrears coming as a surprise?

Given that you can rent a 6 bedroom house within a few miles of there for 2k per month.

Let's assume the "arrears" athered up at 2k per month -> that's 14.5 months worth of arrears.

If it does indeed take (practically) a year to get a tenant out of a property when 0 rent is being paid, then I might start feeling some sympathy.

But 29k of arrears, I smell something about this stroy.

/me looks who published it ... ah yes.

How dumb must people be to swallow this stuff enough that it makes it worth the Daily Flail the time and effort to publish this?

 

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When someone I know tried renting this happened to them.  Tenants never cleaned the place for 4 years and anything that could be broken was broken/destroyed, every wall had some sort of damage.  There was two skips of junk to be disposed of in the garden alone.  Started off a brand new house with a 10k kitchen. 

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4 hours ago, morty said:

When someone I know tried renting this happened to them.  Tenants never cleaned the place for 4 years and anything that could be broken was broken/destroyed, every wall had some sort of damage.  There was two skips of junk to be disposed of in the garden alone.  Started off a brand new house with a 10k kitchen. 

I had a shocker once. Again I purchased with a tenant in situ....and a very unhappy tenant at that. Lots of property issues when I bought it, and but the place was as bad as you could imagine. I couldn’t pay anyone to clear it...yum yum. 
 

As ever, my ‘retaliation’ was to move fast, took my holiday entitlement from work, renovate and relet within a few weeks. 
 

I guess the previous landlord and that tenant ended up with situations which both developed themselves. Neither wanting to extend an olive branch...however, I didn’t have the full facts so that might be a very unfair statement regarding one of the parties? 😬

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nobody has sympathy for landlords except other landlords, complaining about 'nightmare tenants' when nobody asked them to be a landlord is just a waste of time, not sure why the media are bothering with landlord sob stories to be honest

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  • 293 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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