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Mancunian284

SINKIES (Single Income No Kids)

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I heard this expression for the first time today.  It sums me up, knocking 40, good job, stable income.  Not interested in a partner that comes with a kid (or few) in tow, which limits my options, given my age.  I’ve realised that I quite like single life and it would take a lot for me to give that up.  

 

I have wondered before if some people settle for an unhappy relationship to keep a roof over their heads and I’m wondering now if being a SINKIE is a rebellion against that.  Can’t afford kids and a modern lifestyle, given the cost of housing (millionaire actors excluded of course), so opt out of the marriage, mortgage, kids trajectory.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/nov/06/consciously-uncoupled-the-joy-of-self-partnership?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

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Relationships and kids are both a risk and a commitment...men can take the relationship risk but they need a woman to have a child and they require the relationship to succeed a commitment...

So could say twice the risk for men.😉

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I'm glad I've finally been included in one of these acronym groups.

4 hours ago, Mancunian284 said:

I have wondered before if some people settle for an unhappy relationship to keep a roof over their heads

I'm sure some people do.  Some people are also desperate to have kids so will 'settle' for someone.

Edited by Ghostly

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Staying single is mainly a female problem wether They like it or not they have a sell by date certainly if motherhood is involved even more so if they don't look after themselves.

42 in a few weeks and the only women who take any interest are young 20 somethings. Not that I Have any interest in being involved in them I do wonder why they are interested in someone 15-20 years older, strange as I don't parade any bling so it's not gold digger status.

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8 hours ago, winkie said:

Relationships and kids are both a risk and a commitment...men can take the relationship risk but they need a woman to have a child and they require the relationship to succeed a commitment...

So could say twice the risk for men.😉

Sperm donation?

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Hmm, I’m female but I don’t want a man to get half my savings, half my house (if I ever buy one), half my pension.  

 

I certainly dont don’t want to end up responsible for someone else’s kid.  Friend has been with his girlfriend and her kid for 6 years, split up and he’s now paying maintenance for someone else’s kid.

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Having a child (or children) is the biggest project (spanning over a quarter of a century) that you will undertake in your lifetime. 

If you don't have children, you will spend the twilight years of your life wondering what it would have been like if you had. If you have children, you will wonder how much more affluent your life could have been if you had been childless. 

The grass is ALWAYS greener on the other side of the fence. 

A word of caution: if you don't want to have kids, DO NOT have them. Raising a child to independence is a mammoth undertaking, and not to be treated lightly. 

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1 hour ago, Odakyu-sen said:

Having a child (or children) is the biggest project (spanning over a quarter of a century) that you will undertake in your lifetime. 

If you don't have children, you will spend the twilight years of your life wondering what it would have been like if you had. If you have children, you will wonder how much more affluent your life could have been if you had been childless. 

The grass is ALWAYS greener on the other side of the fence. 

A word of caution: if you don't want to have kids, DO NOT have them. Raising a child to independence is a mammoth undertaking, and not to be treated lightly. 

Totally agree....I also agree that children are best brought up in a secure stable family unit, other siblings a bonus......the question is can one good parent be better at bringing up children than two unstable or disfunctional parents......two good best, one good next.... this has nothing to do with how much wealth or riches parents have....some wealthy parents are of the worst kind and some with little money are of the best you can get.😉

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An only child can often be a lonely child. 

If we all only had one child per each couple, we would go extinct a little slower than if we had no children at all. 

And, yes. One parent can raise a child, but it is like driving a car with your feet.Yes, you can do it, but it is hard and it really is better with the two of you. 

To fathers: I am glad of the days I took off work to watch my daughters' sports days and other school activities. A man who sacrifies time with his children for his work is a fool.

Know this: The memories of you and your wife in the minds of your children will live on after you are dead and buried. 

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2 hours ago, Odakyu-sen said:

An only child can often be a lonely child. 

If we all only had one child per each couple, we would go extinct a little slower than if we had no children at all. 

And, yes. One parent can raise a child, but it is like driving a car with your feet.Yes, you can do it, but it is hard and it really is better with the two of you. 

To fathers: I am glad of the days I took off work to watch my daughters' sports days and other school activities. A man who sacrifies time with his children for his work is a fool.

Know this: The memories of you and your wife in the minds of your children will live on after you are dead and buried. 

Thank you for this. These sorts of ideas are important for me, as I need to be continually mindful to balance work and family.

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I remember going to work with my father in the west end... great times and my mother was always at home when we came home from school, come from a large family we didn't have much in possessions or space, but was made up with love and time with parents and siblings...security is a big happy close family....😉

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On 06/11/2019 at 12:49, Mancunian284 said:

I heard this expression for the first time today.  It sums me up, knocking 40, good job, stable income.  Not interested in a partner that comes with a kid (or few) in tow, which limits my options, given my age.  I’ve realised that I quite like single life and it would take a lot for me to give that up.  

 

I have wondered before if some people settle for an unhappy relationship to keep a roof over their heads and I’m wondering now if being a SINKIE is a rebellion against that.  Can’t afford kids and a modern lifestyle, given the cost of housing (millionaire actors excluded of course), so opt out of the marriage, mortgage, kids trajectory.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/lifeandstyle/2019/nov/06/consciously-uncoupled-the-joy-of-self-partnership?CMP=Share_iOSApp_Other

That has to be the most pretentious twaddle I have ever read, which is quite a feat for the Guardian

Still if it's being pushed in the MSM I'll happily cash in and open long positions on cat food, boxed wine, and...intimate...entertainment...device...suppliers?

Edited by chronyx

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8 hours ago, winkie said:

I remember going to work with my father in the west end... great times and my mother was always at home when we came home from school, come from a large family we didn't have much in possessions or space, but was made up with love and time with parents and siblings...security is a big happy close family....😉

In today's world, Winkie, would this not be a luxury?

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16 hours ago, Odakyu-sen said:

In today's world, Winkie, would this not be a luxury?

It should not have to be a luxury....then we were all in the same boat, no mobiles, Tec, fast foods fish and chips, only three TV stations....but lots of youth clubs, discos, great music on vinyl....friends to play with including risky games like swinging over the brook on old car tyre on rope, dangerous games such as conkers and tag.... walk to school over main roads, picking blackberrys...... leave home at 10 home for tea at 4pm....bus ride into town or market top deck...wimpy and chips for lunch....leave school at 16 lots of jobs available where can start making the tea and work your way up.... what happened?😊

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What happened? 

Low-skilled jobs were exported overseas. Technology has  made other jobs redundent. 

While it is true that millions in China and India (billions?) have been lifted out of abject poverty in recent decades, it has come at great cost to workers in the West. 

Mind you, what kind of person would want to be a supermarket checkout packer/cash register operator all their life? It's not a job fit for a human being. Let the customer (or a robot) do it. 

Still, people need income to be able to afford all the goods and services on offer today (or they need cheap credit). 

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22 hours ago, winkie said:

It should not have to be a luxury....then we were all in the same boat, no mobiles, Tec, fast foods fish and chips, only three TV stations....but lots of youth clubs, discos, great music on vinyl....friends to play with including risky games like swinging over the brook on old car tyre on rope, dangerous games such as conkers and tag.... walk to school over main roads, picking blackberrys...... leave home at 10 home for tea at 4pm....bus ride into town or market top deck...wimpy and chips for lunch....leave school at 16 lots of jobs available where can start making the tea and work your way up.... what happened?😊

"Progress" happened.

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  • 295 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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