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Elizabeth

Where Should I Put My Money?

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Well, I'm not real good at speculation, and while I a great deal of respect for the knowledge of a great deal of people, often the thinking is left out of the advice (as a kind of intellectual property protection as I understand it). So while the advice may be sound, I find it hard to trust any kind of advice unless I understand the thinking (and the numbers) myself.

I don't like leaving my savings in piddling rate bank accounts but I haven't got the confidence to take the risks involved in moving it to somewhere more effective. So this is my question.

I know that the 'Fool School' on fool.co.uk offers a lot of advice, but I always feel like I am jumping in at the middle. So is there a straightfoward "dummies guide" to developing an understanding of the markets starting with the basics and adding the variables along the way?

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Well, I'm not real good at speculation, and while I a great deal of respect for the knowledge of a great deal of people, often the thinking is left out of the advice (as a kind of intellectual property protection as I understand it). So while the advice may be sound, I find it hard to trust any kind of advice unless I understand the thinking (and the numbers) myself.

I don't like leaving my savings in piddling rate bank accounts but I haven't got the confidence to take the risks involved in moving it to somewhere more effective. So this is my question.

I know that the 'Fool School' on fool.co.uk offers a lot of advice, but I always feel like I am jumping in at the middle. So is there a straightfoward "dummies guide" to developing an understanding of the markets starting with the basics and adding the variables along the way?

I can't really answer your question but this is what I did - it's important to me that my investments don't go towards the further destruction of the planet, so I decided to make sure that they are green (as dark as possible). That makes the market much smaller although potentially no less effective. Then I sought out an independent financial advisor who specialises in green investments. He has been brilliant and I trust his advice, and you do get the added bonus of having everything spelt out for you - both thinking and numbers. :)

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I too have my savings in very dull places but don't want to invest in evill. Is your financial adviser by any chance in London? If so, would you mind posting their details. If they're not, would you mind saying how you went about picking them so I can do the same thing?

I went for one who advertised in Ethical Consumer magazine. I'll pm the link for you :)

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Well, I'm not real good at speculation, and while I a great deal of respect for the knowledge of a great deal of people, often the thinking is left out of the advice (as a kind of intellectual property protection as I understand it). So while the advice may be sound, I find it hard to trust any kind of advice unless I understand the thinking (and the numbers) myself.

I don't like leaving my savings in piddling rate bank accounts but I haven't got the confidence to take the risks involved in moving it to somewhere more effective. So this is my question.

I know that the 'Fool School' on fool.co.uk offers a lot of advice, but I always feel like I am jumping in at the middle. So is there a straightfoward "dummies guide" to developing an understanding of the markets starting with the basics and adding the variables along the way?

All you can do is read. motley Fool is ok, http://www.incademy.com/pages/home.htm?ginPtrCode=10002 is also worth a look.

Register for free at http://www.digitallook.com/ and you can see lots of numbers about companies, graphs, news etc, get to understand them. Set up a watchlist of some companies that sound familar and track what news comes out and how is affects the share price. Might be worth starting with a couple of well known banks, as they are reporting soon and will be paying out final dividends.

Finally don't get spooked if your company drops a few percent, keep track of what is happening and make your own judgements!

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You need to first consider what YOU want to achieve through investing.

- What is your time horizon?

- How much time do you want to devote to research?

- What is an acceptable rate of return?

- What is your attitude to risk?

Only after asking yourself these sort of questions can you really make a sensible decision on how you're going to approach investing and consider different investment vehicles:

- cash

- bonds/gilts

- property

- stock market

- individual shares

- foreign shares

Most sensible investors would choose to diversify across several of these asset classes. Don't invest in anything you don't understand simply "because prices are going up", and avoid or at least minimize losses before worrying about making any profit (because losses are doubly hard to get back.. you need a share to go up 100% to make up for it if it loses 50%).

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Well, I'm not real good at speculation, and while I a great deal of respect for the knowledge of a great deal of people, often the thinking is left out of the advice (as a kind of intellectual property protection as I understand it). So while the advice may be sound, I find it hard to trust any kind of advice unless I understand the thinking (and the numbers) myself.

I don't like leaving my savings in piddling rate bank accounts but I haven't got the confidence to take the risks involved in moving it to somewhere more effective. So this is my question.

I know that the 'Fool School' on fool.co.uk offers a lot of advice, but I always feel like I am jumping in at the middle. So is there a straightfoward "dummies guide" to developing an understanding of the markets starting with the basics and adding the variables along the way?

Hi Elizabeth

I have been trying to teach myself for the last 5 years, and only last year felt confident enough to have a go and set up an internet trading account.

I recommend the following:

Have a look on the web-site www.dk.com which sells books on "essential lifeskills" for about £5.00. They do one on investing in the stock market. It is a really small book, A6 size, 70 pages and is about as basic as it gets. I have read it and it is a good start.

There is a guide to investing in the stock market in the "Dummies" range - you have probably seen the books, they are those yellow and black books with titles such as "Word for Windows for Dummies", or "French for Dummies" and seem to cover every subject under the sun. I read it ages ago. It was a bit indepth, but good.

Have a look on e-bay to see if you can get hold of them second hand or try your local library.

Also, there are a couple of weekly magazines, available in Newsagents. They are also often available in large libraries. They are The Investors Chronicle and Shares Weekly.

One major key to success seems to be to find a method that works for you and to have the self-discipline to stick to it through thick and thin.

It's not hard to find these methods, the magazines often write a feature on a specific method each week, and many successful investors write books in which they outline their chosen methods.

Good Luck and happy reading.

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There is a guide to investing in the stock market in the "Dummies" range - you have probably seen the books, they are those yellow and black books with titles such as "Word for Windows for Dummies", or "French for Dummies" and seem to cover every subject under the sun. I read it ages ago. It was a bit indepth, but good.

Investing for Dummies

I read this earlier this year. I'd recommend it as a good starting point, especially if you feel you are not wholly financially literate.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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