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Realistbear

B B C Spin Has Gone To Far Today

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4678564.stm

They have gone too far this time. The quote below is the text of my official complaint to the BBC. As soon as I receive a reply I will post the response and file a complaint with my MP, John Maples. IMHO today's report is the worst example of biased reporting I have yet to see coming from the BBC.

Fellow HPCers, we MUST ALL FILE ONLINE COMPLAINTS THIS MORNING--go to the website and click on "contact us" and then click on "Website" and then "Complaint" (Via BBC website). Please report back on this blog with the results.

ITS WAR!

Partiality in reporting.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4678564.stm' rel="external nofollow">

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4678564.stm' rel="external nofollow">
I have read the article by Yorkshire Bank you have referred to and it does not say that 1 in 5 FTBs are willing to pay over the asking price. What it does say is quoted below:
"A further indication of an improving mood in the housing market is that one in five (21 per cent) buyers would be willing to offer above the asking price on a property they really wanted."
As a lawyer I am well aquainted with spin and the art of cross-examination. There is, in my submission, a world of difference between what you have reported and what the article actually says. The minority of buyers willing to pay over the asking price would only do so for a special property, not property in general. Had this same minority been asked if they would pay more for the general run of the mill property on offer they might well have said NO.
You have also conveniently overlooked the following, I quote:
"Yorkshire Bank also found sellers more willing to stand their ground in negotiations. One-in-six (16 per cent) sellers would be unwilling to accept offers under the asking price –"
Far from positive news, this survey is stating quite plainly that 5 out of 6 sellers are now willing to accept reduced offers.
The BBC turns a blind eye to any negative news concerning affordability. The article you quote also overlooks the following, I quote:
"One factor deterring first-time buyers is the prospect of higher council tax. Yorkshire Bank found almost one-in-four (23 per cent) first-time buyers are putting off plans to buy until local councils announce their charges for the year ahead"
This week has seen a number of reports of record repossessions and bankruptcies. To read the BBC reports anyone would think the Chancellor has actually succeeded in creating the perpetual miracle economy.
I am feeling constrained to take this matter up with my MP for an investigation as the level of bias in BBC reporting is disturbing. However, before taking this step I shall be pleased to receive your response.
Edited by Realistbear

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If it were me then I would have left out the comment about the Chancellor. Too blatantly political given the formal tone of the rest of the letter IMO. Good otherwise.

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If they carry on publishing blatant VI c**p like this then they are going to totally discredit themselves with the majority anyway

Just mopping up the last few suckers and stabilising the situation

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4678564.stm

They have gone too far this time. The quote below is the text of my official complaint to the BBC. As soon as I receive a reply I will post the response and file a complaint with my MP, John Maples. IMHO today's report is the worst example of biased reporting I have yet to see coming from the BBC.

Fellow HPCers, we MUST ALL FILE ONLINE COMPLAINTS THIS MORNING--go to the website and click on "contact us" and then click on "Website" and then "Complaint" (Via BBC website). Please report back on this blog with the results.

ITS WAR!

:lol::lol::lol:

As a lawyer, do you really think you will achieve anything with this petty complaint?

...and why are you encouraging others to 'war' against the BBC?

Strange behaviour for a lawyer IMO.

Edited by Without_a_Paddle

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:lol::lol::lol:

As a lawyer, do you really think you will achieve anything with this petty complaint?

...and why are you encouraging others to 'war' against the BBC?

Strange behaviour for a lawyer IMO.

Most MPs are lawyers, this is a political fight. Large numbers of "petty" complaints turn into one serious complaint. What do I have against the BBC? As a supporter of that institution through a hefty license fee I do not expect pro-VI/EA bias with every report.

Strange behaviour for a lawyer? :blink::blink::blink:

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Most MPs are lawyers, this is a political fight. Large numbers of "petty" complaints turn into one serious complaint. What do I have against the BBC? As a supporter of that institution through a hefty license fee I do not expect pro-VI/EA bias with every report.

Strange behaviour for a lawyer? :blink::blink::blink:

Been there, seen how it works and you're completely right. Enough small complaints and entire businesses get shut down altogether for matters far less politically sensitive than media bias. Seen it happen. Once the momentum is established, it's truly amazing how fast change can occur. Business as usual one day with few aware that anything is up. By the end of the week the game's over. Not suggesting the BBC be closed down altogether but the point is that small complaints do lead to big change if there's enough of them.

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Been there, seen how it works and you're completely right. Enough small complaints and entire businesses get shut down altogether for matters far less politically sensitive than media bias. Seen it happen. Once the momentum is established, it's truly amazing how fast change can occur. Business as usual one day with few aware that anything is up. By the end of the week the game's over. Not suggesting the BBC be closed down altogether but the point is that small complaints do lead to big change if there's enough of them.

Hope you will complain through the BBC website Smurf1976--every one will count!

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The BBC suck camel ***** there's my input. All their news has a slant towards something or other its not a neutral point of view, and for societal concerns they don't seem to arsed about hyping property. What about younger people? They don't care imo.

So BBC you suck camel ***** :)

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Excellant - They've changed to title to "May Overpay" from "Will Overpay" !!!! I think they've got the message!

To be honest though, I'm not sure its putting a positive spin on it anyway?

For me its a scary thing, and I'm sure most people will be shocked by it, not encouraged to pay over the asking price? Maybe the small minority of idiots would, but they always will.

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You guys are so blinkered, yesterday you were all welcoming the report (from the BBC) about record levels of bankruptcy. You're the real spinners, every news article to your own advantage - rather than accept at face value.

Edited by Peach

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Excellant - They've changed to title to "May Overpay" from "Will Overpay" !!!! I think they've got the message!

To be honest though, I'm not sure its putting a positive spin on it anyway?

For me its a scary thing, and I'm sure most people will be shocked by it, not encouraged to pay over the asking price? Maybe the small minority of idiots would, but they always will.

Did the original headline say "Will overpay" as opposed to the present headline "May overpay?"

The VI report they based their headline news on says:

"A further indication of an improving mood in the housing market is that one in five (21 per cent) buyers would be willing to offer above the asking price on a property they really wanted. Twelve months ago, only one in eight (13 per cent) would have done so."

http://www.yorkshiretoday.co.uk/ViewArticl...ticleID=1340223

4 out of 5 would not be willing--hence BBC spin accusation.

Edited by Realistbear

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You guys are so blinkered, yesterday you were all welcoming the report (from the BBC) about record levels of bankruptcy. You're the real spinners, every news article to your own advantage - rather than accept at face value.

Not quite, I can only speak for myself but i support factual information, repossessions up is factual, a misquoted representation of a paragraph from someone elses report is not to be supported.

Accept at face value? Yea gawd forbid we question things in life.

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Anything to make the BBC start reporting UNBIASED news is OK in my books! ;)

I agree. I'd have been inclined to have a beef with the BBC for ramping house prices when I already need a 135% pay increase to buy a house in my area, but it's gone far beyond that point now. You only have to have more than four brain cells to know exactly where house prices are going over the next decade, whatever 'noise' there may be in the market over the next ten months or so. My concern now is that the BBC are being puppeted by EAs who's only aim is to encourage more young people to over-extend themselves so they can ride this 'miracle train of inflation' that is, in reality, anything but.

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4678564.stm

They have gone too far this time. The quote below is the text of my official complaint to the BBC.

My complaint below:

Your article 'First-time buyers 'may overpay' at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4678564.stm is absolute twaddle. How does a survey commissioned by a building society warrant being put at the top of the Business News section?

We all know that a survey can be constructed to achieve whatever results the commissioning party wishes. So a survey of this nature commissioned by a building society is unlikely to come up 'First Time Buyers Looking for Significant Discounts'. The survey does not warrant the attention you are giving it on your web pages.

In any case after reading the article issued by the Yorkshire Bank it is clear that you have misrepresented it. In one extract the Yorkshire Bank says "A further indication of an improving mood in the housing market is that one in five (21 per cent) buyers would be willing to offer above the asking price on a property they really wanted.", i.e. for a SPECIAL property, NOT property in general

You have also conveniently overlooked the following quote:

"Yorkshire Bank also found sellers more willing to stand their ground in negotiations. One-in-six (16 per cent) sellers would be unwilling to accept offers under the asking price". Far from positive news, this survey is stating quite plainly that 5 out of 6 sellers are now willing to accept reduced offers.

You also turn a blind eye to any negative news concerning affordability and overlook the following quote: "One factor deterring first-time buyers is the prospect of higher council tax. Yorkshire Bank found almost one-in-four (23 per cent) first-time buyers are putting off plans to buy until local councils announce their charges for the year ahead"

What is wrong with reporting the actual news? There are first time buyers who on the basis of your misreporting may enter into the biggest financial transaction of their lives. Supposing house prices go down and they end up in negative equity? Or they struggle with a high mortgage, student debt and higher taxes. Is this a route to happiness and a better life?

I expect the BBC to perform significantly better in its analysis of the housing market. If the BBC wishes to justify a higher licence fee then it should be accurate and analytical in the reporting of the news, not serve the self interests of those who make a living from selling houses.

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My complaint below:

Your article 'First-time buyers 'may overpay' at http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/business/4678564.stm is absolute twaddle. How does a survey commissioned by a building society warrant being put at the top of the Business News section?

We all know that a survey can be constructed to achieve whatever results the commissioning party wishes. So a survey of this nature commissioned by a building society is unlikely to come up 'First Time Buyers Looking for Significant Discounts'. The survey does not warrant the attention you are giving it on your web pages.

In any case after reading the article issued by the Yorkshire Bank it is clear that you have misrepresented it. In one extract the Yorkshire Bank says "A further indication of an improving mood in the housing market is that one in five (21 per cent) buyers would be willing to offer above the asking price on a property they really wanted.", i.e. for a SPECIAL property, NOT property in general

You have also conveniently overlooked the following quote:

"Yorkshire Bank also found sellers more willing to stand their ground in negotiations. One-in-six (16 per cent) sellers would be unwilling to accept offers under the asking price". Far from positive news, this survey is stating quite plainly that 5 out of 6 sellers are now willing to accept reduced offers.

You also turn a blind eye to any negative news concerning affordability and overlook the following quote: "One factor deterring first-time buyers is the prospect of higher council tax. Yorkshire Bank found almost one-in-four (23 per cent) first-time buyers are putting off plans to buy until local councils announce their charges for the year ahead"

What is wrong with reporting the actual news? There are first time buyers who on the basis of your misreporting may enter into the biggest financial transaction of their lives. Supposing house prices go down and they end up in negative equity? Or they struggle with a high mortgage, student debt and higher taxes. Is this a route to happiness and a better life?

I expect the BBC to perform significantly better in its analysis of the housing market. If the BBC wishes to justify a higher licence fee then it should be accurate and analytical in the reporting of the news, not serve the self interests of those who make a living from selling houses.

Excellent!! Lets have more complaints-the BBC need to know that VI spin will not be tolerated.

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Vested Interests will not help the situation if it is already bad.

They will make it worse when the actual recession/housing market crash occurs.

People shouldn't worry about any sort of spin. It all comes out in the wash !!!!! :lol::lol:

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If a complaint is clearly justified, the BBC will wait weeks before replying to you. They hope you will have forgotton by that point.

I requested the regional breakdown from the Nationwide + Halifax (top and bottom 10) to be included when they report January's figures (as the regional breakdown wasn't mentioned). I did this as soon as the regional figures came out.

The BBC to date has not responded. I sent emails twice, and a complaint after the Nationwide article was released. They won't reply until it is too late. They will come up with some excuse (so far I have got the "little time" excuse).

Clearly, the Haliwide did not want the regional figures to be mentioned in the media.

That is why the BBC are a joke.

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Looking at the story, it'd be interesting to track down the news release that inspired it and see how similar the wording is!

Edited by gruffydd

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The key issue for me on this is that the whole thing is a "nothing story". There are much more important things happening in the business world than some survey on people's property aspirations, and yet the BBC chose to give it no.1 spot on the business page. This is very disturbing.

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For what it's worth I've sent in this comment on their web shite...

"Rather than reporting drivel like this....

First-time buyers 'may overpay'

Maybe the BBC News website should be looking into value for money and quality issues regarding newly built housing.

For example take a look at these retirement homes in Norwich.

http://www.rightmove.co.uk/viewdetails-928...pa_n=2&tr_t=buy

They are set in the red light district in Norwich on a street frequented by prositutes, some of whom have been murdered!

http://www.guardian.co.uk/women/story/0,3604,684395,00.html

This is one of many illustrations where the housing market has created opportunities to make money at the expense of first time buyers, those moving up the "ladder" and those seeking a peaceful retirement.

More investigative journalism wouldn’t go amiss on this site?"

Edited by bobed

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Perhaps you should email the Beeb and ask them if they will cover the story in the Blog "FT.com - Investors warned to avoid property".

Actually don't bother, they'll print it as "HSBC say London House Prices set to rise".

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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