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I wonder if all the other dark blue areas also have a system of ''in work benefits'' to fudge the unemployment figures?

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3 hours ago, nome said:

I wonder if all the other dark blue areas also have a system of ''in work benefits'' to fudge the unemployment figures?

Maybe Sweden, but I dont think anywhere else has it.

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Devon and Cornwall....N Yorks,  Cumbria...all less than 3.5% unemployment??? How did that happen?

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I remember when David Cameron was on his rounds trying to renegotiate European terms of membership,  European politicians coming out of the parliament incredulously stating that they had to have the concept of in work benefits explained to them.

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1 hour ago, nothernsoul said:

I remember when David Cameron was on his rounds trying to renegotiate European terms of membership,  European politicians coming out of the parliament incredulously stating that they had to have the concept of in work benefits explained to them.

Forgive my ignorance here, but are things like working tax credit only a UK thing?

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Sanctions on benefits, scam "courses", scam self employment; all ways to fiddle the figures down. Also education and pensions. 

Offset by the duck and dive cash in hand club.

Getting hard to know what the true rate is. 

Anyone got a graph of ( y axis) percentage of population earning enough to buy a house, vs (x axis)  year? We need to distinguish getting ahead vs just surviving. 

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Quote

The eurozone area's seasonally-adjusted unemployment rate was 7.7% in March 2019, down from 7.8% in February 2019 and from 8.5% in March 2018, according to Eurostat.

That is the lowest rate recorded since September 2008, the start of the global financial crisis.

The unemployment rate in the wider EU also dropped to 6.4% in March 2019, down from 6.5% in February 2019 and from 7.0% in March 2018.

That's the lowest level in 19 years.

 

 

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11 hours ago, Clarky Cat said:

Forgive my ignorance here, but are things like working tax credit only a UK thing?

As far as I'm aware, and I'm no expert, only the US, UK and Australia operate such a system.

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25 minutes ago, PaulParanoia said:

As far as I'm aware, and I'm no expert, only the US, UK and Australia operate such a system.

Interesting:

 

syOCLKf8H4DzyodzA5mKWRgQaskdB0EYO2D6uoly

 

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An interesting map; as you go South it all goes South.  It neatly illustrates the divide within the EU between the Northern members and the ones around the Mediterranean.

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I read the figures were fiddled at one time by excluding 1. Those who worked part time 2 those who'd given up looking and 3. Those who were currently unavailable.

And that they doubled the official figures ( then). 

Much like sanctions, disability benefit and pseudo self employment do here. 

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2 hours ago, 24gray24 said:

I read the figures were fiddled at one time by excluding 1. Those who worked part time 2 those who'd given up looking and 3. Those who were currently unavailable.

 And that they doubled the official figures ( then). 

Much like sanctions, disability benefit and pseudo self employment do here. 

The ILO definition of unemployment still has these exact problems you describe. 
https://www.ilo.org/ilostat-files/Documents/description_UR_EN.pdf

There's 2 sets of unemployment figures the media trot out, the ILO numbers or the claimant count. i.e those on JSA. 

Claimant count is easily manipulated, you just sanction people, or make them work in a charity shop full time for their £75 a week until they either stop claiming... or set up an "Avon business" to get tax credits. 

 

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22 hours ago, PeanutButter said:

Interesting:

 

syOCLKf8H4DzyodzA5mKWRgQaskdB0EYO2D6uoly

 

Looks like Canada have some form of Tax Credits too.  So 4 of the top 6 preferred migration destinations offer this sort of 'incentive'.

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34 minutes ago, PaulParanoia said:

Looks like Canada have some form of Tax Credits too.  So 4 of the top 6 preferred migration destinations offer this sort of 'incentive'.

Tax credits may well have an impact, but equally I'd have thought one of the big draws of USA, UK, Canada and Australia is that English is spoken - potential migrants are more likely to speak some English than other languages.

The USA is also far ahead of all the others no doubt mainly because it's the richest country on Earth, rather than anything else.

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29 minutes ago, scottbeard said:

Tax credits may well have an impact, but equally I'd have thought one of the big draws of USA, UK, Canada and Australia is that English is spoken - potential migrants are more likely to speak some English than other languages.

The USA is also far ahead of all the others no doubt mainly because it's the richest country on Earth, rather than anything else.

This is one of the things that blows my mind when I read about how many asylum seekers are lodging requests to live in Japan. 

Where on earth did you get the idea that Japan was an easy country to move to??? 

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15 hours ago, Council estate capitalist said:


Claimant count is easily manipulated, ..make them work in a charity shop full time for their £75 a week until they either stop claiming...

 

That is appalling, I am quite in favour of workfare but you should at least get the minimum wage so for £75 you should only have to work 10 or so hours.

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3 hours ago, iamnumerate said:

That is appalling, I am quite in favour of workfare but you should at least get the minimum wage so for £75 you should only have to work 10 or so hours.

I'd be in favor of it too if it was reasonable and was close to minimum wage, It would feel like working for the benefit rather than government funded free labour for supermarkets. 

It also must not result in companies cutting employee hours/not hiring real employees. Something with a social benefit like litter picking would be suitable,  There's enough rubbish in the streets here to keep many working. 

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4 hours ago, Council estate capitalist said:

I'd be in favor of it too if it was reasonable and was close to minimum wage, It would feel like working for the benefit rather than government funded free labour for supermarkets. 

It also must not result in companies cutting employee hours/not hiring real employees. Something with a social benefit like litter picking would be suitable,  There's enough rubbish in the streets here to keep many working. 

It is sad that we have such extreme politicians when it comes to benefits those who give too much and those too little, there is no middle.

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I have only been unemployed for 10 weeks twenty years ago, but would dread it. A single person who becomes unemployed, through no fault of their own, despite paying decades of full tax and national insurance receives just 75 pounds a week(that is half the state pension) . This is a fraction of the amounts paid out in tax credits(to individuals and the welfare system as a whole) to those with kids who have made zero contribution, yet it is the former labeled the scrounger. 

 

 

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10 hours ago, nothernsoul said:

I have only been unemployed for 10 weeks twenty years ago, but would dread it. A single person who becomes unemployed, through no fault of their own, despite paying decades of full tax and national insurance receives just 75 pounds a week(that is half the state pension) . This is a fraction of the amounts paid out in tax credits(to individuals and the welfare system as a whole) to those with kids who have made zero contribution, yet it is the former labeled the scrounger. 

 

 

Very true

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A Spanish colleague of mine explained that while in the UK we massively under-record unemployment, in Spain it's common than here for people claim unemployment benefit but then do low paid work still. In effect subsided work - although still counted as unemployed though, but if we were to include tax credits as unemployed as per the Spanish definition, what would our colours be on the map?

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23 hours ago, scottbeard said:

Tax credits may well have an impact, but equally I'd have thought one of the big draws of USA, UK, Canada and Australia is that English is spoken - potential migrants are more likely to speak some English than other languages.

The USA is also far ahead of all the others no doubt mainly because it's the richest country on Earth, rather than anything else.

I'm sure English is the big draw.  But I'm also sure there's plenty of people who came to the UK just because of the open benefits system too.

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  • 295 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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