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bear.getting.old

EPC requirements for landlords on house prices

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Probably old news but I've never seen it discussed here, from last April houses rented out must be EPC rated E or above, with fines on LL's who ignore this on old inefficient properties. Isn't this leading to more LL's selling up alongside the tax relief changes, just throwing in the towel. 

Currently its E but who's to say it won't be raised to D etc in future...?

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11 minutes ago, ebull said:

I think it's this April that it applies to existing tenancies as well.

It doesnt apply to existing tenancies 

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22 minutes ago, BobbyZZZ said:

It doesnt apply to existing tenancies 

OK sorry, they seem to have given an extra year. Will apply to existing from 2020. I think at some point it was planned to be this year.
 

Quote

April 2020 Changes

In April 2020, the new MEES rules will apply to all existing lets. At this point, you will need an EPC rating of an E or above to let your property at all.

Even if your tenancy is already underway and you have no plans to renew, after April 2020, you will need to have an EPC rating of E or above or you could face fines.

 

https://blog.openrent.co.uk/epc-rules-2018-time-running-out-for-landlords/

Also:

Quote

properties reach at least an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) rating of E before granting a new tenancy to new or existing tenants.

These requirements will apply to all private rented properties in England and Wales, even where there has been no change in tenancy arrangements:

  • from 1 April 2020 for domestic properties

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-private-rented-property-minimum-standard-landlord-guidance-documents

Suspect that this also means any letting agent who have made a new contract since 2018 in order to collect renewal fees will have caused the LL to need an EPC-E. Bet there are a few in that situation.

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Moved out of a rental conversion flat with very poor EPC in July18. LL had assessor in to work out what it would cost to get it to an E. Place is old and not well looked after.  LL decided to put it up for sale. I thought it would be interesting to see how quick it went since it wouldn't be too attractive for any btl folks, so only good for people who need a place to live.  Agent: "this will shift in no time, a,ready some folks i know who will be interested blah balh" Apr19 and still hasn't shifted.

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25 minutes ago, Simples said:

Moved out of a rental conversion flat with very poor EPC in July18. LL had assessor in to work out what it would cost to get it to an E. Place is old and not well looked after.  LL decided to put it up for sale. I thought it would be interesting to see how quick it went since it wouldn't be too attractive for any btl folks, so only good for people who need a place to live.  Agent: "this will shift in no time, a,ready some folks i know who will be interested blah balh" Apr19 and still hasn't shifted.

Nice.

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There is an exemption that if the energy improvement works cost more than £3500 the landlord doesn't have to do them.

While reading the government document I came across this line regarding "green deal funding" that is available.

"The Green Deal charge is attached to the electricity meter at the rental property. It is paid off over time by the bill payer – so in most cases the tenant rather than the landlord."

 

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38 minutes ago, Council estate capitalist said:

There is an exemption that if the energy improvement works cost more than £3500 the landlord doesn't have to do them.

While reading the government document I came across this line regarding "green deal funding" that is available.

"The Green Deal charge is attached to the electricity meter at the rental property. It is paid off over time by the bill payer – so in most cases the tenant rather than the landlord."

 

Wonder if there's any obligation to tell tenants about this before they sign a contract? [Even an obligation to give an accurate answer if asked].

Sign up for a rent of 300/mo and discover a surcharge of 100/mo on the leccy bill. Bit unreasonable.

Also can it be added to rent when claiming HB?

If we had competent MPs or even an on-the-ball Shelter charity, would expect these questions to have been enswered when the legislation  was passed. By contrast, I assume the extra delays and exemptions are down to lobbying by LL groups.

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10 minutes ago, ebull said:

 

Wonder if there's any obligation to tell tenants about this before they sign a contract? [Even an obligation to give an accurate answer if asked].

Sign up for a rent of 300/mo and discover a surcharge of 100/mo on the leccy bill. Bit unreasonable.

Also can it be added to rent when claiming HB?

If we had competent MPs or even an on-the-ball Shelter charity, would expect these questions to have been enswered when the legislation  was passed. By contrast, I assume the extra delays and exemptions are down to lobbying by LL groups.

Good question, Yes the landlord has to tell the tenant & get them to sign an acknowledgement,  Or face the penalty of having to pay the green deal money back.... In theory.

How this works in practice is another matter.  I can imagine some tenants just signing the forms put in front of them & if they are on a key meter probably won't understand exactly how they are being ripped off. 

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My landlord wants us to sign a new tenancy agreement... How much will it cost him to get an EPC done? Our heating has a broken thermostat and no timer... Will that affect the EPC rating, or is it just based on the kind of heating?

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18 hours ago, Council estate capitalist said:

There is an exemption that if the energy improvement works cost more than £3500 the landlord doesn't have to do them.

Business idea: set up a company that will carry out energy improvement works for landlords and charges £100 for an online estimate. The estimate will always come out to at least £3501.

Edited by Dorkins

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  • 295 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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