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juvenal

New build nightmares - mortar come..

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28 minutes ago, thewig said:

Slums of the future. Been saying it for years on here and elsewhere

At least the slums of the past involved not quite so fundamentally terrible buildings, even if the amenities were dire. You could do something with them, not with these.

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4 hours ago, juvenal said:

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-47816530

How come all the neighbours are leaving, and not a single Sale board to be seen?

Wow.

Tests arranged by homeowner showed 7 of 8 samples had too little cement in the sand-cement mix.

The HO have basically given up and accepted  a solution from Taylor Wimpey which is basically scraping out the bit closest to the surface / re-pointing.

The mortar holding the bricks together is basically then still too weak but just held in place by stronger mortar on the outside and [assuming a cavity wall] bits of insultion on the inside.

Better make sure you don't lean too hard on them walls.

One thing I miss in the article is where is the council in this. Assume that Taylor Wimpey did their own sign off on building regs but surely the council building regs dept could have been involved in assessing the problems.

If they are found to be deficient surely Taylor Wimpeys right to sign off their own building regs should be removed. At that point it looks like government dept job. Once again a system where those who break the rules see no / insignificant consequence and just carry on with making their profits.

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The weight of the building should hold it together far more than the mortar AIUI, which is why there are old buildings standing where you can scrape the mortar out with your finger easily enough (built with weaker and more flexible lime mortar in the first place). I guess a couple of thin walls might need gluing together more strongly.

Also AIUI the outermost bit - pointing - is mostly about keeping water out. I'd be worried if the plan was to use that to stop my house falling down.

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The council said

Quote

The local council in Peebles says the mortar used was not the type in the original building warrant and was changed later without its knowledge

How is that allowed?

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Quotes from the article that just show the crooked state of the industry, and the supine councils who turn a blind eye so they can charge council tax on the new homes:

Sheila later heard that the properties had been bought back by Taylor Wimpey after problems were discovered. The owners had signed non-disclosure agreements so they could not speak out.

-----

She paid for assessments by two different structural engineers, who both said the house needed extensive repair work, though Taylor Wimpey said its own inspections found that was not the case.

-----

The results suggested that there was far more sand in the mix than you would expect for a home in that area, although Taylor Wimpey says the type of chemical test used was "not appropriate" and the results could not be relied upon.

----

By then, Pete and Jill had hired their own engineers to examine the house. They recommended that the couple should stop using the garage because it was at risk of collapse, although Taylor Wimpey denies that there was a structural problem.

The couple bought a giant shipping container, covered it with warning stickers and left it on their front lawn.

That, they say, got Taylor Wimpey's attention and - two years down the line - an agreement has now been reached for their home to be fixed. 

"It falls short of where we think a full repair should be, but they have said it's that or nothing - so we have accepted it," Jill says.

-----

  • The local council in Peebles says the mortar used was not the type in the original building warrant and was changed later without its knowledge
  •  
  • -----
  • Taylor Wimpey says the material was "of sufficient strength to meet structural requirements" as "supported by an independent review" by the local council, but accepts it may be "less durable under prevailing exposure conditions"

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That's not the only problem Taylor wimpy have got: they've also sold 1000s of flats with ground rent doubling every 10 years.

Can't get a mortgage on them. 

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Stating the bleedin' obvious perhaps here but this is just cutting corners (in the extreme) by all these building companies for maximum profit/mad gainz? Throw HTB into the mix too...you could not make it up. Oh let's not forget the nice fat salaries & bonuses of the CEO's too. Should I laugh or cry?

Anyway more importantly (my mad gainz innit), is it worth shorting any/all of the builders, or have I missed the boat?

Edited by highcontrast

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4 hours ago, highcontrast said:

Stating the bleedin' obvious perhaps here but this is just cutting corners (in the extreme) by all these building companies for maximum profit/mad gainz? Throw HTB into the mix too...you could not make it up. Oh let's not forget the nice fat salaries & bonuses of the CEO's too. Should I laugh or cry?

Anyway more importantly (my mad gainz innit), is it worth shorting any/all of the builders, or have I missed the boat?

Depends on your view of whether authorities will act [against their mates]. IMO no chance.

My question is in a different direction. When there is no effective control on quality or even fit for purpose supplied by authorities in a very very expensive and over regulated country, are unregulated free for all countries [aka the third world] not only more pleasant in some respects but also offerring much better value?

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I really cant understand this one. There must be a standard for tests on brick mortar. Surely if the property failed the standard there would be a law firm willing to take the cases on a conditional fee arrangement. It's not like TW dont have the cash. 

 

There's something similar going on in Ireland at the moment with the mica content in bricks. Basically loads of houses are falling down because builders decided to use bricks with high micra levels. 

 

The Irish government has setup a 300 million redress fund. 

 

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.rte.ie/amp/1002044/

 

 

Edited by 2buyornot2buy

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I bet they simply tried to cost cut when building. It wouldn't even surprise me if the contractors nicked the cement to sell themselves. So on file the specs are correct, but in reality they aren't.

However, it's easier for the developers to get out the lawyers than actually fix the issue.

I've bought two new builds, never had any problems apart from easy to fix snags. And on both times the builders were nicking materials to flog to the new homeowners. I bet every [additional] patio slab on our estate is half-inched from the developer!

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