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mrtickle

David Goodhart, Policy Exchange - the problem is that houses are too cheap in the north!

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"Politics Live" today. Talking about North/south divide.

David Goodhart said "One of the biggest single burning north-south injustices over the last 30-40 years is what's happened to property prices. If you live in the London and the south-east and a few pockets else where, the value of your property has risen 4 or 5 times"

Oh good, I think, he's going to say how it's screwed everyone, all the money tied up in property and not invested in or contributing to the wider economy.

Ayesha Hazarika: "...and you've done nothing productive to deserve it" - bang on correct.

David Goodhart, continuing "...but other areas of the country have had no BOOST at all".

FFS. He thinks that high house prices are a "boost", and a GOOD thing. Instead of only children in the south-east being screwed, the problem is that children in the north haven't been screwed as well!
 

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1 hour ago, btd1981 said:

Are there any stats for fertility comparing north vs south, or showing any correlation between house prices and fertility?

Pass - the only thing I know is that low house prices up north mean I can purchase anything I want any time I want unlike my brother who had little choice but to purchase a property down south with an eye watering mortgage.

It also means he's reliant on our retired baby boomer parents for meals out and treats, while I can afford to argue over whose turn it is to pay...

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from Wikipedia - 

 

Early life and education[edit]

Goodhart is one of seven children born to Valerie Forbes Winant (the niece of John Gilbert Winant) and Conservative MP Sir Philip Goodhart.[2][3] He is a great-great-grandson of Mayer Lehman, co-founder of Lehman Brothers. He was educated at Eton College, and the University of York, where he gained a degree in history and politics.[4] He has written of being an "old Etonian Marxist" in his late teens and early 20s.[5]

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50 minutes ago, Chunketh said:

He's obviously not tried buying in Didsbury

Exactly. The notion that 'everywhere up North is cheap' is nonsense.

A reasonable house in  a reasonable area is still going to be a big mortgage for a typical couple with decent jobs that both work full time.

Cheap houses only exist where there are no jobs, or in really crappy areas.

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18 hours ago, mrtickle said:

"Politics Live" today. Talking about North/south divide.

David Goodhart said "One of the biggest single burning north-south injustices over the last 30-40 years is what's happened to property prices. If you live in the London and the south-east and a few pockets else where, the value of your property has risen 4 or 5 times"

Oh good, I think, he's going to say how it's screwed everyone, all the money tied up in property and not invested in or contributing to the wider economy.

Ayesha Hazarika: "...and you've done nothing productive to deserve it" - bang on correct.

David Goodhart, continuing "...but other areas of the country have had no BOOST at all".

FFS. He thinks that high house prices are a "boost", and a GOOD thing. Instead of only children in the south-east being screwed, the problem is that children in the north haven't been screwed as well!
 

Ah yes,

Economists.

 

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5 hours ago, Andy T said:

Exactly. The notion that 'everywhere up North is cheap' is nonsense.

A reasonable house in  a reasonable area is still going to be a big mortgage for a typical couple with decent jobs that both work full time.

Cheap houses only exist where there are no jobs, or in really crappy areas.

Absolutely. I've looked in cheap Northern areas and they are either in crap areas where you wouldn't want to live  - miles from any facilities or they have no jobs there, or usually both. Living there would soon get boring. Sure I have a house - but no job and no life. Wages are low in areas where there are jobs but houses are not much cheaper than the SE so no point 

Edited by bear.getting.old

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7 minutes ago, bear.getting.old said:

Absolutely. I've looked in cheap Northern areas and they are either in crap areas where you wouldn't want to live  - miles from any facilities or they have no jobs there, or usually both. Living there would soon get boring. Sure I have a house - but no job and no life. Wages are low in areas where there are jobs but houses are not much cheaper than the SE so no point 

Shush!

You'll upset his equilibrium.

 

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Uk median income is just under 30 grand. So if prices in the north are historically too cheap we should all be able to have our pick of decent properties for 4x that amount. In most places 120 grand will get you something, but that would be a terrace at the lower end of the market (the type of house i live in), nowhere near what a first time buyer, on say a teachers income could have got twenty years ago in the same town. 

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He has a degree in history and politics. Innumerate by other definitions.

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On 10/04/2019 at 14:11, bear.getting.old said:

Absolutely. I've looked in cheap Northern areas and they are either in crap areas where you wouldn't want to live  - miles from any facilities or they have no jobs there, or usually both. Living there would soon get boring. Sure I have a house - but no job and no life. Wages are low in areas where there are jobs but houses are not much cheaper than the SE so no point 

I am not sure about that.  Chorley has low unemployment, wages are slightly lower than average but the average house price is a lot lower £190k - compared to £312K - both figures from Zoopla.

http://www.lancsvitalsigns.co.uk/Chorley--r4.html

 

However the idea that a house can be too cheap is crazy.

Edited by iamnumerate

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It is the people that make a place......that is why giving good people a good reason not to move away and giving people a good reason to want to move there.......when we are living in a centralised country, where investment and infrastructure, jobs and facilities are to be found in one big expanding place and a very few other places....

What makes it even worse is wanting to push certain people out of the place with the most opportunities to the places with no opportunity...... escalating and compounding the huge divides further......and no a train going north to south slightly faster at escalating cost will not improve anything.......that money ~80 billion pounds should be invested in the North and the improvement of transport links connecting Northern towns.....growing business, tax breaks, broadband, IT, education and training first.....improvement of the neglected areas to encourage greater growth in prosperity.......😉

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2 hours ago, iamnumerate said:

I am not sure about that.  Chorley has low unemployment, wages are slightly lower than average but the average house price is a lot lower £190k - compared to £312K - both figures from Zoopla.

http://www.lancsvitalsigns.co.uk/Chorley--r4.html

£190k for a slightly below average wage might be a lot cheaper than average but there's no way it could be called cheap in absolute terms. First Google result gives the UK average salary as £29k, so £190k is six and a half times that. So more for an area a little below average.

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22 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

£190k for a slightly below average wage might be a lot cheaper than average but there's no way it could be called cheap in absolute terms. First Google result gives the UK average salary as £29k, so £190k is six and a half times that. So more for an area a little below average.

True

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  • 298 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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