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Saving For a Space Ship

Growing complaints about new-build houses  

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They are talking about poor builders not being eligible for the next Help to Sell to make big profits public funding.

A house is not an good looking chip £3k kitchen or £1k bathroom (buy a bathroom for £300 and a few tiles and flooring for not much more).....it is not stupid cushions and flowers....it is construction, quality of materials, quality of build and the after sales snagging service.......not cheap and cheerful, grab the money and run.;)

 

Edited by winkie
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The Queens Hills area (NR8) , a couple of miles away from me. Just one access road in and out of this estate that serves several hundred households. Others have complained to the press about shoddy construction of houses in this area in the past. 

Perhaps Wimpey should have stuck to burgers! 

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9 hours ago, Saving For a Space Ship said:

Growing complaints about new-build houses  

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-47826166

Quote

The Home Builders Federation own satisfaction surveys show a rise in the number of customers reporting snags - from 93% in 2015 to 99% in 2018.

That is shocking!  Specially considering the prices and profits.

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17 minutes ago, MattW said:

The Queens Hills area (NR8) , a couple of miles away from me. Just one access road in and out of this estate that serves several hundred households. Others have complained to the press about shoddy construction of houses in this area in the past. 

Perhaps Wimpey should have stuck to burgers! 

So many new build homes going up around the fine city.

HTB fodder though illogical otherwise with scary resale opportunities down the line.

All like toy-towns on a sunny day if you squint its like Merriyvale model village.

No facilities & existing facilities packed.

The way Norwich is growing (with few employers either) Norwich City will need a 40/50k stadium.

https://www.propertyweek.com/data/middle-england-shines-on-fastest-growing-cities-list/5085724.article

 

 

Edited by Fromage Frais

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6 minutes ago, Fromage Frais said:

So many new build homes going up around the fine city.

HTB fodder though illogical otherwise with scary resale opportunities down the line.

All like toy-towns on a sunny day if you squint its like Merriyvale model village.

No facilities & existing facilities packed.

The way Norwich is growing (with few employers either) Norwich City will need a 40/50k stadium.

https://www.propertyweek.com/data/middle-england-shines-on-fastest-growing-cities-list/5085724.article

 

 

this is social commentary too if you absorb the metaphor....

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22 minutes ago, Bear Hug said:

That is shocking!  Specially considering the prices and profits.

Is it though ? 

A house is mearly an inconvenience that needs to be built to a minimum standard to get access to funds. Since the 70's 90% of new housing is chite

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I had a funeral wreath delivered to a friend that bought a new build, with my sincere condolences for his future loss.  He laughed. 

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59 minutes ago, Fromage Frais said:

All like toy-towns on a sunny day if you squint its like Merriyvale model village.

No facilities & existing facilities packed.

Very true. :o I had a difficult task trying to find an NHS dentist recently. <_<

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Says there is a chronic shortage of skilled construction workers with total lack of investment......many of the best and knowledgeable skilled workers are retiring.....years of lack of training, few apprenticeships, shortage of skilled and well trained builders and associated qualified trades, under valued and under paid......;)

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29 minutes ago, winkie said:

Says there is a chronic shortage of skilled construction workers with total lack of investment......many of the best and knowledgeable skilled workers are retiring.....years of lack of training, few apprenticeships, shortage of skilled and well trained builders and associated qualified trades, under valued and under paid......;)

The future is square boxes to satisfy lending requirements. No skilled labour needed. Just a shed with some thick walls. 10k build 200k retail.

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11 hours ago, Saving For a Space Ship said:

Growing complaints about new-build houses  

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-47826166

 

Previous article on residents..

Norwich home owners leave as Taylor Wimpey fix faults

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-england-norfolk-44139491

Everything pointing towards a Property mis-selling scandal. I won't be surprised if these buyers band together and take on legal action against these builders.

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3 hours ago, longgone said:

Is it though ? 

A house is mearly an inconvenience that needs to be built to a minimum standard to get access to funds. Since the 70's 90% of new housing is chite

A slight exaggeration.

1980s/1990s housing quality seemed pretty adequate (if slowly getting more unimaginative and smallish) until the turn of the Millennia, then housing build quality, design, and locationing in earnest really fell off a cliff. 

Really, the awfulness of new builds has been reaching a tipping point this past decade.

Edited by Big Orange

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2 hours ago, Big Orange said:

A slight exaggeration.

1980s/1990s housing quality seemed pretty adequate (if slowly getting more unimaginative and smallish) until the turn of the Millennia, then housing build quality, design, and locationing in earnest really fell off a cliff. 

Really, the awfulness of new builds has been reaching a tipping point this past decade.

At least in the last cycle we got some larger as in  larger houses, new build estates.

I have yet to see a new build development remotely tempting from this recent boom near me

Edited by Fromage Frais

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Quote

The Home Builders Federation own satisfaction surveys show a rise in the number of customers reporting snags - from 93% in 2015 to 99% in 2018.

5 hours ago, Bear Hug said:

That is shocking!  Specially considering the prices and profits.

To be honest, in something as complex as a house, I'd expect 100% of them to have a snag of some sort: bearing in mind a snag could be something as tiny as "this door handle is scratched".  The 1% who don't report a snag probably don't have a perfect house, just snags so small they don't bother to report them.

What alarms me is more the *severity* of the snags - people saying they've had to have entire kitchens/bathrooms replaced etc.  To be honest, the kitchen being so bad as to need replacing isn't really a "snag" at all, it's just a complete build fail.

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17 minutes ago, Fromage Frais said:

At least in the last cycle we got some larger as in  larger houses, new build estates.

I have yet to see a new build development remotely tempting from this recent boom near me

I noticed the houses from the early to mid 90s in my neck of the woods to be noticeably more spacious and have far better ergonomics than a typical new build in the past 15 or so years.

Really, the only new housing with any passable quality and thought put into in them is a "eco village".

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11 hours ago, longgone said:

The future is square boxes to satisfy lending requirements. No skilled labour needed. Just a shed with some thick walls. 10k build 200k retail.

You could say in this throw away world the economy does not benefit from well built homes, built from solid quality materials lasting several hundreds of years with few faults or major repairs......keeps people in jobs, legal work, and money churning.;)

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12 hours ago, 24gray24 said:

I had a funeral wreath delivered to a friend that bought a new build, with my sincere condolences for his future loss.  He laughed. 

Friend of mine bought a wreath for a work colleague suffering spinal meningitis , the note on the wreath said 'if you don't die you can use it at christmas'. 

Almost lost his job over it. They were good mates with dark sarcastic sense of humour, but it upset a few other people at work.

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11 hours ago, Big Orange said:

I noticed the houses from the early to mid 90s in my neck of the woods to be noticeably more spacious and have far better ergonomics than a typical new build in the past 15 or so years.

Really, the only new housing with any passable quality and thought put into in them is a "eco village".

What that tells me is that.

80/90s Price boom for actual end users people taking huge debts to get bigger houses.  

This boom speculators and Government handouts ie making investment unit property rather than homes and building just enough to get someone onto the gov scheme and get those HTB readies. 

Just bizarre there are more executive flats than executives in Norwich many of which i dont think have sold since the 2006/2008 period.

Edited by Fromage Frais

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1 hour ago, Fromage Frais said:

What that tells me is that.

80/90s Price boom for actual end users people taking huge debts to get bigger houses.  

This boom speculators and Government handouts ie making investment unit property rather than homes and building just enough to get someone onto the gov scheme and get those HTB readies. 

Just bizarre there are more executive flats than executives in Norwich many of which i dont think have sold since the 2006/2008 period.

I think that's right...the end user is not at the front of their minds as is the case with most consumer products.  And do you think the architect, developer or planning official would live In one of these new houses....of course not.

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5 hours ago, winkie said:

You could say in this throw away world the economy does not benefit from well built homes, built from solid quality materials lasting several hundreds of years with few faults or major repairs......keeps people in jobs, legal work, and money churning.;)

everything else is throw away why not houses 😄 buy expensive buy twice.

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To winkie I am not sure where you are getting the underpaid from,  £1000 a week is  normal for bricklayers. I had a plasterer round to do my bathroom 2 yrears ago he told me painters were on £750 a week.

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21 hours ago, scottbeard said:

 

To be honest, in something as complex as a house, I'd expect 100% of them to have a snag of some sort: bearing in mind a snag could be something as tiny as "this door handle is scratched".  The 1% who don't report a snag probably don't have a perfect house, just snags so small they don't bother to report them.

What alarms me is more the *severity* of the snags - people saying they've had to have entire kitchens/bathrooms replaced etc.  To be honest, the kitchen being so bad as to need replacing isn't really a "snag" at all, it's just a complete build fail.

When a house costs £200k-£300k, I don't see why someone cannot spend an entire day examining the whole place to avoid any snags at all.  I know it's complex but there are lots of things which are complex where imperfections are not tolerated - cars for example.

 

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