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How sky-high rents forced people into imaginative alternatives

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Tenants and others who found unusual ways to keep a roof over their head in an era of record costs

Renting a property in the UK can be a bleak business. The average monthly rent rose to £932 last month and in London it is even more expensive at £1,588, according to new figures. It is of little surprise then that more young people are choosing to stay in the family home. Recent research showed nearly a million more young adults live with their parents than was the case two decades ago. The proportion of people aged 20 to 34 who live with their parents has risen from 19% in 1997 to 25% in 2017 – some 3.4 million people, according to the thinktank Civitas.

With spiralling rents leaving many people with barely any disposable income, let alone the means to save towards a deposit, some are now choosing alternatives.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/money/2019/feb/17/high-rents-alternative-living-arrangements

Just live in a van! #lifeontheroad 

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Depends on where your parents live and how many spare bedrooms they have.....those who are fortunate enough to live in the most expensive areas close to where they work have more freedom and better choices, can do far more and save so much more.......You pay how much rent????;)

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24 minutes ago, longgone said:

Lives in a van yet he smiles. i guess having a mug with your name on it makes all the difference. 

 

He's just had a dump on Rees-Mogg's lawn.

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Office administrator Tina Gotla-Aluri, 42, was struggling to cope with the £950 a month she was paying for her house share in Putney, south-west London, when a friend suggested Share and Care Homeshare, which matches older homeowners who have a spare room with people who can offer practical help in exchange. She now lives in Putney with a man in his 90s and pays £180 a month to the scheme.

In return, Gotla-Aluri provides companionship, goes food shopping, and cooks meals. “He is quite well travelled and food is one of the things we have bonded over,” she says. “I cook British food like Sunday dinners and sometimes Indian or Moroccan food. It’s mutually beneficial.”

She says the lower rent has made her less anxious about money. “It has given me breathing space. It was very stressful. I was only working to pay rent, and as an administrator I don’t make much. I hardly had anything left for food and travel. It was very depressing, but now I can go to the cinema and out with friends.”

 

working only to pay rent ??  why bother working go on the social. 

going to the cinema to pay £20 to watch one film and £10 for a box of popcorn. 

The high life. 

i feel less of a chump reading these stories 

Thanks OP.😄

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The Guardian has obviously sold its soul.  Did anyone notice the disclaimer at the bottom of this article, saying that they have been paid for the links in the article?

Rather than take a stand and say these kinds of living conditions are unacceptable for working people, they are profiting from the providers of this kind of living.

They could have written 'ADVERTORIAL' at the top, but they did not.  Quite unacceptable for a paper purportedly of 'the left'.

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20 hours ago, longgone said:

 

working only to pay rent ??  why bother working go on the social.

Why? Because:

- local housing allowance is far below private rents

- vast majority of landlords won't take someone on HB, a few will take them but only with a guarantor or 6 month's rent in advance which is difficult to save up for

-  5 to 9 week wait for anything due to universal credit changes

- getting through the application process is complicated and humiliating and even if your claim is successful, unless you have schizophrenia you will be subject to regular meetings and/or work capability assessments which are designed to make you as miserable as possible so you give up your claim.

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18 minutes ago, EnglishinWales said:

Why? Because:

- local housing allowance is far below private rents

- vast majority of landlords won't take someone on HB, a few will take them but only with a guarantor or 6 month's rent in advance which is difficult to save up for

-  5 to 9 week wait for anything due to universal credit changes

- getting through the application process is complicated and humiliating and even if your claim is successful, unless you have schizophrenia you will be subject to regular meetings and/or work capability assessments which are designed to make you as miserable as possible so you give up your claim.

can`t be any less humiliating than going to work paying the landlord and nothing else left. 

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1 minute ago, longgone said:

can`t be any less humiliating than going to work paying the landlord and nothing else left. 

Yes it is, tenants on HB are sometimes going into debt to pay the rent. 

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1 minute ago, EnglishinWales said:

Yes it is, tenants on HB are sometimes going into debt to pay the rent. 

and half as many are probably better off than workers. 

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  • 293 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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