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PeanutButter

How big data can help solve the UK's housing crisis (no, really)

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The property industry has for years been resistant to change, stagnating in endless paperwork, dated professional practises and rotating government schemes. Yet there have been signs that this is shifting. And the first group to embrace this change are those with the most to gain – property developers.

London-based startups LandInsight and UrbanIntelligence have slowly been revolutionising the land market by providing online, accessible land data. Instead of exhausting themselves trying to navigate the research needed for buying land, developers are now able to access all the information they need in one user-friendly place. The data-driven maps these companies produce not only save their clients time, but remove the burden of data sharing from local authorities, which previously had to offer these services.

UK councils certainly play a big role in housing, but if these land services show us anything, it’s that local authorities cannot be relied on to provide the innovation that the housing market needs.

2019 will be the year when emerging businesses recognise the need for market innovation, and utilise data to turn this into capital gain. Evidence of this is already apparent in the rise of online versions of traditionally offline services, such as architects. Online architects are still in their infancy, but are already proving a powerful disrupting force.

 

https://www.wired.co.uk/article/big-data-housing-crisis

 

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28 minutes ago, PeanutButter said:

UK councils certainly play a big role in housing, but if these land services show us anything, it’s that local authorities cannot be relied on to provide the innovation that the housing market needs.

why would they most council employees are low skilled admin people 

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Just now, happyguy said:

why would they most council employees are low skilled admin people 


I expect people earning over £100,000 to be able to use the vast funds available to them effectively and for the good of the people. 

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In 2016-17:

There were at least 2,306 council employees who received total remuneration in excess of £100,000. This is 60 fewer than the previous year.

558 council employees received remuneration in excess of £150,000.

The council with the most employees who received remuneration in excess of £100,000 was the City of London Corporation with 31. Although some of these employees were only partially paid from the City Fund.

The council with the next most employees who received remuneration in excess of £100,000 was Wandsworth with 30.

There were 77 councils with at least 10 employees who received remuneration in excess of £100,000.

Birmingham had three employees who received remuneration in excess of £250,000

 

https://www.taxpayersalliance.com/town_hall_rich_list_2018

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24 minutes ago, PeanutButter said:

I expect people earning over £100,000 to be able to use the vast funds available to them effectively and for the good of the people. 

I agree so would I, but having worked as a consultant with a number of LA's most of the employees  would never survive in a commercial organisation 

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49 minutes ago, happyguy said:

I agree so would I, but having worked as a consultant with a number of LA's most of the employees  would never survive in a commercial organisation 

From experience, most people in commercial organisations wouldn't survive outside of that specific organisation...that's the nature of corporates / large entities - hire -> hide -> retire

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I suppose the Peter principle applies. 

I know a chap who worked in council planning in the 60s, proper heyday of social construction. They really cared, they really wanted to make poor workers live better lives in better homes. 

 

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What a load of ********. The housing crisis isn’t a puzzle that needs solving ‘with innovation’ it’s not complicated or difficult.  

The problem is that it is a zero sum game: solving the housing crisis means bankrupting landlords.  

There’s no compromise solution or work around. However you get prices down, they still have to go down, otherwise you haven’t fixed anything. And a minority of very wealthy people, and their armies of useful idiots, do not want that.

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37 minutes ago, FreeFall said:

From experience, most people in commercial organisations wouldn't survive outside of that specific organisation...that's the nature of corporates / large entities

True of some certainly not of all which is why many move jobs and change careers 

Most in the private sector do not work for large corporates 

There were 5.7 million Small and medium size business Es in the UK in 2018, which was over 99% of all businesses.  People in those business do not have the latitude to hide and do nothing 

21 minutes ago, BorrowToLeech said:

People who live in glass houses...

Not really

You make a childish comment about someone you have no knowledge or experience of

 I have an engineering / electrical degree - have owned 2 companies one of which I sold and allowed me to pay my mortgage one - of which I still run 

I have worked with 2 LA's and a Housing Association and I do have experience of the lazy, clock watching mentality.  The fact is that most (not all) people on these organisations are low skilled admin staff. 

Some like the social workers work under extreme pressure in a difficult job and I have great respect for them.

Most are perfectly nice people I would not dispute that at all.   

 

 

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2 hours ago, BorrowToLeech said:

What a load of ********. The housing crisis isn’t a puzzle that needs solving ‘with innovation’ it’s not complicated or difficult.  

The problem is that it is a zero sum game: solving the housing crisis means bankrupting landlords.  

There’s no compromise solution or work around. However you get prices down, they still have to go down, otherwise you haven’t fixed anything. And a minority of very wealthy people, and their armies of useful idiots, do not want that.

Thank you.  Keep bringing it back to the basic truth.

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6 hours ago, BorrowToLeech said:

What a load of ********. The housing crisis isn’t a puzzle that needs solving ‘with innovation’ it’s not complicated or difficult.  

The problem is that it is a zero sum game: solving the housing crisis means bankrupting landlords.  

There’s no compromise solution or work around. However you get prices down, they still have to go down, otherwise you haven’t fixed anything. And a minority of very wealthy people, and their armies of useful idiots, do not want that.

So true 

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  • 293 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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