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btd1981

Boomer Freudian Slips

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At the annual huge family get together this year, my mother in law (who I like very much) came out with a nice little ice breaker

"Young people these days seem to be under this impression that they've somehow got things harder than we did"

Well that was me thoroughly triggered. Forgetting the own goals, like her and her husband buying a house on their early twenties and raising a family of four by the age of thirty on admin wages, her recently retiring in her very early sixties, I came out with the (knowingly exaggerated) "well you were able to buy a house for about twenty quid".

Her response? "Well in that case we would only have been earning about ten quid a year"

Exactly...

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4 minutes ago, btd1981 said:

At the annual huge family get together this year, my mother in law (who I like very much) came out with a nice little ice breaker

"Young people these days seem to be under this impression that they've somehow got things harder than we did"

Well that was me thoroughly triggered. Forgetting the own goals, like her and her husband buying a house on their early twenties and raising a family of four by the age of thirty on admin wages, her recently retiring in her very early sixties, I came out with the (knowingly exaggerated) "well you were able to buy a house for about twenty quid".

Her response? "Well in that case we would only have been earning about ten quid a year"

Exactly...

Some of my elder family members are a little fairer, they will tell me of the trade union protection that was ridiculous  back in the 1950's to 1980's, the 3 day week, some of the big companies government owned sound laughable from what I have heard, work was an annoyance. Houses were usually 2 to 3 times wages and the choice was fantastic.

For those wanting to go down the path of education and work life was a dream back then

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Perhaps if you are average it’s more difficult to admit you had things easy.

That’s not say that all “admin” boomers are as out of touch with the reality of how nowadays banks create (lots of) money out of thin air and devalue working for money.

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1 hour ago, btd1981 said:

At the annual huge family get together this year, my mother in law (who I like very much) came out with a nice little ice breaker

"Young people these days seem to be under this impression that they've somehow got things harder than we did"

Well that was me thoroughly triggered. Forgetting the own goals, like her and her husband buying a house on their early twenties and raising a family of four by the age of thirty on admin wages, her recently retiring in her very early sixties, I came out with the (knowingly exaggerated) "well you were able to buy a house for about twenty quid".

Her response? "Well in that case we would only have been earning about ten quid a year"

Exactly...

She does have a point, life was not all roses for them

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I really don't understand why the Boomers find it so hard to put 2 and 2 together. Your 30something children in dual income households with jobs that pay well above average wages are still living in private rentals, house prices are very high relative to their wages, maybe there could be some connection? One of those weird cognitive dissonance things like ultra-Christian teenage girls who don't "realise" they're pregnant until the baby is coming out while they're sat on the toilet, oh and they haven't had a period for 9 months, and come to think of it there was that shameful thing that happened 9 months ago.

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12 minutes ago, prozac said:

She does have a point, life was not all roses for them

It's much less rosy for their equivalents today. Two 30 year olds on admin wages with 4 kids in 2019, hello renting from a series of slumlords for life.

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3 minutes ago, Dorkins said:

It's much less rosy for their equivalents today. Two 30 year olds on admin wages with 4 kids in 2019, hello renting from a series of slumlords for life.

People used to live day to day, my parents used to buy second hand items all the time, we never had holidays

we used to buy cheap cuts of meat from the butcher with lots of fat on it.

It was not all rosy, houses were cheaper but it was a hard life in its own way.

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19 minutes ago, prozac said:

It was not all rosy, houses were cheaper but it was a hard life in its own way.

Boo-hoo -  no generation has had it all rosy, and that wasn’t even suggested.  What previous generations never experienced was a nasty and twisted “market”.

 

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7 minutes ago, Freezer? Best place for it said:

Boo-hoo -  no generation has had it all rosy, and that wasn’t even suggested.  What previous generations never experienced was a nasty and twisted “market”.

 

House prices are twisted in the south, look at Blackpool or Scarborough you can pick up a nice house for a very reasonable price 

Tell me why you don't want to go there? 

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42 minutes ago, prozac said:

Tell me why you don't want to go there? 

I PERSONALLY like “The Royal Hotel” in Scarborough, but wouldn’t want to live near the town, even if the Germans promised not to shell it again.

Edited by Freezer? Best place for it

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2 minutes ago, Freezer? Best place for it said:

I PERSONALLY like “The Royal Hotel” in Scarborough, but wouldn’t want to live near the town, even if the Germans promised not to shell it again.

Most people in Scarborough cannot earn what they would in london for the same job 

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There was a bit of a difference from 50 to 60 years ago to today....a) Most people rented, renting was secure, rents were subject to rent tribunals so landlords couldn't just increase rents to force people out, there were better places to invest money, there were no BTL mortgages.....b) It was very hard to obtain a mortgage, large cash deposits required, interest rates were high, capital growth was low.....;)

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4 hours ago, btd1981 said:

At the annual huge family get together this year, my mother in law (who I like very much) came out with a nice little ice breaker

"Young people these days seem to be under this impression that they've somehow got things harder than we did"

Well that was me thoroughly triggered. Forgetting the own goals, like her and her husband buying a house on their early twenties and raising a family of four by the age of thirty on admin wages, her recently retiring in her very early sixties, I came out with the (knowingly exaggerated) "well you were able to buy a house for about twenty quid".

Her response? "Well in that case we would only have been earning about ten quid a year"

Exactly...

Ahhh, you were "triggered" by an old woman who was making small talk in an attempt to entertain you at the family bash? Poor you. In future stay at home in your safe space.

Here's some new years resolutions for you....Grow up, ease back with the self pity and play the hand you have been dealt.

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3 hours ago, prozac said:

She does have a point, life was not all roses for them

She does, it wasn't all roses for them. It became all roses in the mid-2000s when the housing bubble really took off.

In the late 90s, housing wasn't a big issue. I was earning about 20K and you could buy a decent house for £70K. I felt wealthy at the time even though I didn't want to buy a house. I remember my friend's parents were struggling running their B&B they'd bought a decade earlier and I felt sorry for them.

After the housing bubble I became the poor one and my friend's parents became the wealthy ones with all that phony property wealth. They are retired now and no doubt spurting out the same old bull$shit as all the other boomers.

In reality, it's just been one big massive ponzi fiat debt bubble, enriching some at the expense of others.

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7 minutes ago, Captain Kirk said:

She does, it wasn't all roses for them. It became all roses in the mid-2000s when the housing bubble really took off.

In the late 90s, housing wasn't a big issue. I was earning about 20K and you could buy a decent house for £70K. I felt wealthy at the time even though I didn't want to buy a house. I remember my friend's parents were struggling running their B&B they'd bought a decade earlier and I felt sorry for them.

After the housing bubble I became the poor one and my friend's parents became the wealthy ones with all that phony property wealth. They are retired now and no doubt spurting out the same old bull$shit as all the other boomers.

In reality, it's just been one big massive ponzi fiat debt bubble, enriching some at the expense of others.

What year did you buy your house?

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17 minutes ago, Roman Roady said:

Ahhh, you were "triggered" by an old woman who was making small talk in an attempt to entertain you at the family bash? Poor you. In future stay at home in your safe space.

Here's some new years resolutions for you....Grow up, ease back with the self pity and play the hand you have been dealt.

the hand that has been dealt is: income is irrelevant, wealth is what matters. So young people that start at 0 wealth, suck it up! 

Nice way of thinking chap

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6 minutes ago, prozac said:

What year did you buy your house?

I didn't. I bought a flat in the late 90s but sold it soon after due to reasons not worth going into. I never bought again because it was obvious we were in a housing bubble. When it popped in 2008 I remember thinking I'd been vindicated, but then the muppets at the BoE and idiots in government managed to reflate the bubble.

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If all this was accidental, im sure the younger generation could bare it more. Unfortunately, the attitude seems to have been," well we took advantage of the welfare state and post war settlement, didnt like where things were going in the 70s so voted thatcher in, enjoyed the benefits she gave us but please protect us from the negative side just up until we croak and you have our vote" Its been like watching somebody pulling up the planks of a bridge as they cross it. Without government interference houses would be more affordable, unfortunately that wouldnt go down well at the ballot box. 

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My recent story...

Boomer: "everyone is practically a millionaire these days"

Me: "are they?"

Boomer: "yeah everyones house is worth £500k"

I didn't correct them on the arithmetic or indeed so few under 55's are even half a millionaire, but although they didn't mean any harm with the statement it does confirm that generation have lost touch with reality.

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3 minutes ago, nightowl said:

everyone is practically a millionaire these days"

Me: "are they?"

Boomer: "yeah everyones house is worth £500k"

I didn't correct them on the arithmetic...

LOL

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25 minutes ago, Captain Kirk said:

I didn't. I bought a flat in the late 90s but sold it soon after due to reasons not worth going into. I never bought again because it was obvious we were in a housing bubble. When it popped in 2008 I remember thinking I'd been vindicated, but then the muppets at the BoE and idiots in government managed to reflate the bubble.

But then, you must have a big deposit 

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  • 293 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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