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Pre - Fab Cost £65,000

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Just caught this article, a few days old, whilst doing a google news search for housing news:

 

Quote

'UK housebuilding revolution': £65,000 prefab homes go into production

Two Yorkshire factories try to tackle housing crisis with modular two and three-bedroom homes

followed later by the important point:

 

Quote

The factory cost of a two or three-bedroom home would be from £65,000 to £79,000, although that excludes the cost of land, on-site assembly and connecting the home to services, which could double or triple the final price.

That sentence perfectly sums up the problem of housing in the country, the land price.

 

I can easily afford 65k. I  could save that and with some help from BOMAD purchase in one go w/o going to the banks.

 

I have been saying for a long time now, that the easiest, cheapest way for the government to do away with the housing crisis and create a boom in jobs, is to torpedo the "Town and Country Planning Act of 1968". It's the cheap, libertarian way. You buy a plot, you build on the plot, and you pay a fee to connect the house to the mains and gas etc. You have complete freedom to build the house that you like, so this would solve the god-awful idetity kit sprawls that are latching on to the edge of towns and cities. 

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You haven't included a link.

£65,000 is a heck of a lot of money for a couple of truckfuls of nail-gunned softwood and plasterboard, I'm not surprised the company flogging it are keen.

It's not really very cheap, in the UK you can have a proper house built from long-lasting brick and block for around £1000/square metre (depending on area).  That would be around £100k for a decent-sized 100sqm house, probably equalling what this unmortgageable wooden shed would cost after building foundations then assembling and fitting it out.

In either case, as you rightly point out, you need somewhere to stick the thing.  But this prefab idea is just a distraction really, it doesn't solve anything or save any money.

Bricks are well under a quid each, and paying someone to stack them up with a bit of goo between them doesn't cost much either.

The one and only advantage of a prefab (vs the many disadvantages) is build speed.  You might spend less time in a static caravan, or a housebuilder might be able to flog them quicker (if anyone would want to or be able to buy them that is).

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Typically woodland in the south east is £7.5k per acre bulk or £10k per acre in small parcels. Agricultural/Pastural land is £10k bulk or £15k small parcels.

People are already buying up plots of woodland for ridiculous prices anticipating that they allow this at some point.

Very often on right move or on-the-market you can see 0.3 acres of woodland with no planning permission near a main road in Surrey/Berkshire for £40k.

Overall I do think this would be a good thing to relax planning laws. It would flood the market with new homes and bring prices down, making buy-to-let less attractive and would cause a sell-off of them.

 

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30 minutes ago, Tes Tickle said:

You haven't included a link.

£65,000 is a heck of a lot of money for a couple of truckfuls of nail-gunned softwood and plasterboard, I'm not surprised the company flogging it are keen.

It's not really very cheap, in the UK you can have a proper house built from long-lasting brick and block for around £1000/square metre (depending on area).  That would be around £100k for a decent-sized 100sqm house, probably equalling what this unmortgageable wooden shed would cost after building foundations then assembling and fitting it out.

In either case, as you rightly point out, you need somewhere to stick the thing.  But this prefab idea is just a distraction really, it doesn't solve anything or save any money.

Bricks are well under a quid each, and paying someone to stack them up with a bit of goo between them doesn't cost much either.

The one and only advantage of a prefab (vs the many disadvantages) is build speed.  You might spend less time in a static caravan, or a housebuilder might be able to flog them quicker (if anyone would want to or be able to buy them that is).

Haven't you noticed that legislating and complicating everything as much as possible is the UK way of making a living?

I'd have said not much more than half that would make a lot more sense. 

As it's housing we can charge what we feel were entitled to, the government will print the money to ensure we get it.

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34 minutes ago, Tes Tickle said:

You haven't included a link.

£65,000 is a heck of a lot of money for a couple of truckfuls of nail-gunned softwood and plasterboard, I'm not surprised the company flogging it are keen.

It's not really very cheap, in the UK you can have a proper house built from long-lasting brick and block for around £1000/square metre (depending on area).  That would be around £100k for a decent-sized 100sqm house, probably equalling what this unmortgageable wooden shed would cost after building foundations then assembling and fitting it out.

In either case, as you rightly point out, you need somewhere to stick the thing.  But this prefab idea is just a distraction really, it doesn't solve anything or save any money.

Bricks are well under a quid each, and paying someone to stack them up with a bit of goo between them doesn't cost much either.

The one and only advantage of a prefab (vs the many disadvantages) is build speed.  You might spend less time in a static caravan, or a housebuilder might be able to flog them quicker (if anyone would want to or be able to buy them that is).

Well, we can talk about the quality of pre fabs. I have no idea about this in all honesty. What I do know is the quality of "traditiona'" new builds are complete and utter sh1t.

 

I'd give pre fab a go for a meere 65k. No more rent for me ; )

 

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29 minutes ago, APerson said:

Typically woodland in the south east is £7.5k per acre bulk or £10k per acre in small parcels. Agricultural/Pastural land is £10k bulk or £15k small parcels.

People are already buying up plots of woodland for ridiculous prices anticipating that they allow this at some point.

Very often on right move or on-the-market you can see 0.3 acres of woodland with no planning permission near a main road in Surrey/Berkshire for £40k.

Overall I do think this would be a good thing to relax planning laws. It would flood the market with new homes and bring prices down, making buy-to-let less attractive and would cause a sell-off of them.

 

I would buy a woodland, and build a house in the center of it. Imagine waking up in a forest every day :D

5 minutes ago, Bluestone59 said:

Haven't you noticed that legislating and complicating everything as much as possible is the UK way of making a living?

I'd have said not much more than half that would make a lot more sense. 

As it's housing we can charge what we feel were entitled to, the government will print the money to ensure we get it.

Yes obviously. There is a reason why we have 5 big builders and near no independents and house prices are stratospheric and quality is sh1t.

This in a free market would not last 5 minutes. Competition would kick in almost imediately, as you could go high quality same price or less quality lower price.

edit: @maffo in oxford how easy wwould it be to set up an independent building company if there where no planning permission act, and you could just build on aplot of farmland?

Edited by No One

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29 minutes ago, No One said:

What I do know is the quality of "traditiona'" new builds are complete and utter sh1t.

 

 

Newly built houses made of brick and/or block are absolutely brilliant and should last for centuries, long after any softwood timber framed junk has turned to compost.

You're judging the building technique based on what's produced by the mass builders.  That's like deciding what beef tastes like based on eating a Big Mac.

My plan is to self-build.  In my case that will mean closely supervised brickies plus a few other trades plus lots of DIY.  A properly built solid house will be vastly superior to any nailed together softwood prefab shed and will, from what I'm seeing, cost roughly the same.

Edited by Tes Tickle

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Find a mortgage for a prefab house, it's a very limited market. This is only going to force issues when trying to sell as the prospective buyers will struggle to get a mortgage.

This in turn forces you to reduce the price as it isn't a 'traditional' construction method. Tread carefully with mmc's (modern methods of construction)

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1 hour ago, No One said:

Just caught this article, a few days old, whilst doing a google news search for housing news:

 

followed later by the important point:

 

That sentence perfectly sums up the problem of housing in the country, the land price.

 

I can easily afford 65k. I  could save that and with some help from BOMAD purchase in one go w/o going to the banks.

 

I have been saying for a long time now, that the easiest, cheapest way for the government to do away with the housing crisis and create a boom in jobs, is to torpedo the "Town and Country Planning Act of 1968". It's the cheap, libertarian way. You buy a plot, you build on the plot, and you pay a fee to connect the house to the mains and gas etc. You have complete freedom to build the house that you like, so this would solve the god-awful idetity kit sprawls that are latching on to the edge of towns and cities. 

Depends on what part of the country you put the house

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It has always been a land issue there is no housing issue houses don't cost much more to build now than 2 decades ago. Deliberate restricted planning and deliberate financial control to find it.

Comparing a self build to a bovis build is not the same thing mass builders use the cheapest chit they can get away with the cheapest red concrete clay bricks and MDF doors and arcitraves coving etc thin fast grown timber.

A small developer built 2 houses near me and they look bomb proof the upstairs was built with a concrete floor and even the stairway was concrete precast before being lifted in solid old style internal walls a very quite place to live I would imagine. Expensive though.

Big developers just build rubbish can't even hang a picture up. 65k for softwood rockwool and plasterboard no thanks.

 

 

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50 minutes ago, Tes Tickle said:

Newly built houses made of brick and/or block are absolutely brilliant and should last for centuries, long after any softwood timber framed junk has turned to compost.

You're judging the building technique based on what's produced by the mass builders.  That's like deciding what beef tastes like based on eating a Big Mac.

My plan is to self-build.  In my case that will mean closely supervised brickies plus a few other trades plus lots of DIY.  A properly built solid house will be vastly superior to any nailed together softwood prefab shed and will, from what I'm seeing, cost roughly the same.

ptfffff, well yes the self build stuff will last forever, so what?

 

I am talking of the identitykit new builds that make 96% of the market

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I'm proud to be part of the 4% that's not buying one then!

This is a bit of a false argument anyway, as many newbuilds that look like solid masonry are prefab timber framed anyway, just with a single skin of bricks or rendered block around the outside.  The bricks are entirely for decoration, insulation and weatherproofing - they do not hold the walls, floors or roof up.  They often assemble the frame, including the floors and roof before a brickie gets near the place.  If (probably when) water finds its way in and rots the base of the timber frame then it's going to fall down, and it's probably a choice of demolition or major repairs that might not solve the problem in the long term.

Wood is basically food for all sorts of nature (insects, fungus etc) , so is destined turn into compost - it's only a matter of when, not if.  Steel wants to combine with oxygen to make rust.  In either case, treatments and coatings only delay the inevitable.  Stone has already done all the degrading it's ever going to do - it's a lump of basic minerals.

Chuck a piece of steel, a chunk of wood and a lump of concrete in a field and come back in 10 years, see which lasts longest.  I know which my money would be on, I wouldn't build a house out of materials that are basically going to dissolve.

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3 hours ago, No One said:

@maffo in oxford how easy wwould it be to set up an independent building company if there where no planning permission act, and you could just build on aplot of farmland?

It would be as easy as it is now i.e. nothing stopping you apart from needing some contractual knowledge such as CDM reg's, F10 HSE notifications, possibly contacting council/highways about sections 38/278 if a frontage, roadway or access is altered/required, notifying planning, building control and utilities etc.

The design and construction aspects you can offer to sub contractors.

Edited by maffo in oxford

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1 minute ago, maffo in oxford said:

It would be as easy as it is now i.e. nothing stopping you apart from needing some contractual knowledge such as CDM reg's, F10 HSE notifications, possibly contacting council/highways about sections 38/278 if a frontage, roadway or access is altered/required, notifying planning, building control and utilities etc.

What are CDM regulations about?

F10?

HSE?

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CDM: Construction design and management regulations, mostly the appointment of health and safety responsibility for a project.

F10: Notification of a building project to the HSE, needed if the project exceeds 30 working days, 500 labour hours or has more than 20 workers on site at any one time

HSE: Health and Safety Executive i.e. the big boys!

Edited by maffo in oxford

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1 hour ago, Tes Tickle said:

Chuck a piece of steel, a chunk of wood and a lump of concrete in a field and come back in 10 years, see which lasts longest.  I know which my money would be on, I wouldn't build a house out of materials that are basically going to dissolve.

Traditional building has wood keeping the roof up, but I suppose as long as the roof is maintained (i.e. replace the odd slate or tile blown off in a gale) it should last as long as the rest of the building. Wood near the ground that you rely on, that's something to be avoided for anything more than the garden shed.

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This is of massive interest to me, I am a huge fan of the potential of pre-fab, and I have a six figure sum sat in the bank and would quite willingly part with the lot if if the government pulled it's finger out, i.e sort the land issues out in the UK if they are really serious about getting homes built. I am quite certain there are many like me as well, I am even prepared to buy land in an area with no utilities and aching to set up a few powerwall batteries and generate my own energy.

Just do a little research yourselves, we moved on light years from the post WW2 prefabs and there is some wonderful designs around the world at little cost, imagine what China could do with this. BUT, and there is a big but, looking into this as an option will just highlight the problem in the UK, too much meddling with land and no sincere motivation from government to build housing in a housing crisis and risk their values on their homes, and of course the need to placate the corrupt banking industry

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  • 293 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

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      • down 5% +
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