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New homes 'crumbling due to weak mortar'

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Faced with what could be an expensive repair bill, many homeowners have been told by their own solicitors not to go public until the issue is resolved.

In some cases, customers have ultimately had their houses bought back by either the homebuilder or the NHBC.

In others, it appears repairs have been made and compensation paid as part of a deal that involves the signing of a non-disclosure agreement or gagging clause.

gagging orders should be banned

 

https://www.bbc.com/news/business-46454844

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Weaker than the crumbly stuff still in many old buildings? Bad to see stuff starting to disintegrate this quickly of course but more of a symptom of generally overall shoddiness?

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15 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

Weaker than the crumbly stuff still in many old buildings? Bad to see stuff starting to disintegrate this quickly of course but more of a symptom of generally overall shoddiness?

I'm pretty sure there's a survivor bias in old houses. Any shoddily built old houses have either been knocked down or repaired by now.

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I'm staggered if it is a simple as the builder willing to ruin houses worth hundreds of thousands of pounds to save on cement at £25 per bag... it would be like Mercedes fitting bungee cords instead of seat belts!

Also, did they not think they would get caught out?

 

 

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Did anyone see Watchdog on BBC last night, showed some really shady builder with very poor quality new builds who was also using Help to Buy/ with an off-books Builders contribution meaning the unsuspecting buyers were actually committing mortgage fraud. One owner had bought a new build for £179,000, and because of the build quality and defects, it is valued at £100,000. They had barely used mortar at all, with spaces in the pointing between the bricks which was letting water into the house. 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b0bv24fs/watchdog-series-40-episode-6

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39 minutes ago, StuartMc said:

 

Also, did they not think they would get caught out?

 

 

Basically yes, 10 year warranty then sorry mate not my problem

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For years I've been surprised by just how yellow the mortar I've seen on building sites is.  I've done a bit of DIY bricklaying myself, and my mortar is greyish when mixed according to the standard recipe.  It weathers to yellowish eventually, but at least it starts off grey.  I've seen them on the local newbuild estate using what looks just like wet sand.

There is some science in ensuring the mortar is weaker than the bricks, but even so it shouldn't just fall out.

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54 minutes ago, Si1 said:

I'm pretty sure there's a survivor bias in old houses. Any shoddily built old houses have either been knocked down or repaired by now.

One half of mine isn't very well built.. There's probably something to be said for survivor bias but I don't think too many fell down of their own accord (or if they did it was within a few years of being built).

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The bloke who's got a massive crack has probably got subsidence rather than bad pointing, i.e. the foundations have cracked.  The mortar isn't there to stop the wall moving, that's the job of the foundations, which presumably got a similarly generous measure of cement.

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Just now, Tes Tickle said:

For years I've been surprised by just how yellow the mortar I've seen on building sites is.  I've done a bit of DIY bricklaying myself, and my mortar is greyish when mixed according to the standard recipe.  It weathers to yellowish eventually, but at least it starts off grey.  I've seen them on the local newbuild estate using what looks just like wet sand.

There is some science in ensuring the mortar is weaker than the bricks, but even so it shouldn't just fall out.

Sand from different sources can be different colours (whether or not this should make it through to visibly different mortar even if all the mortar is decent isn't something I've got a clue about).

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Usually the blond yellow sand makes nice greyish buff coloured mortar, the classic colour.  The earwax orange sand makes a horrible brown, which is why I don't buy it from B&Q.  But in either case the grey cement should darken it, if there's a sufficient amount anyway.

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1 hour ago, StuartMc said:

I'm staggered if it is a simple as the builder willing to ruin houses worth hundreds of thousands of pounds to save on cement at £25 per bag... it would be like Mercedes fitting bungee cords instead of seat belts!

Also, did they not think they would get caught out?

 

 

more like £3  

 

most  builds have a temporary mixer in place where the mortar is premixed just plumb it in to water. 

Silo-6.jpg

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11 hours ago, Tes Tickle said:

The bloke who's got a massive crack ....

Huh-huh, huh-huh, huuh-huh. Hey, Beavis, he said "massive crack". Huh-huh, huh-huh

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On 06/12/2018 at 10:50, StuartMc said:

I'm staggered if it is a simple as the builder willing to ruin houses worth hundreds of thousands of pounds to save on cement at £25 per bag... it would be like Mercedes fitting bungee cords instead of seat belts!

Also, did they not think they would get caught out?

 

 

Been on a few courses recently and the current business management vogue seems to be 'incremental improvements'.

Sat through a long presentation about the sky cycling team and how they shave a gram off a bolt, use thinner paint to save another gram then all these small changes and drops in the bikes weight come together to guarantee success. In essence - cut everything you can see to the bone and keep 'innovating'  and 'thinking outside the box' about other stuff you can cut to guarantee 'success'.

I'm sure for builders 'success' is defined as getting customers to pay the highest price possible for the house built with the least or lowest cost materials 

Reminds me of Stewart Milne flats In Aberdeen. Because they have used the smallest joists possible the deeds stipulate moore than 10 people can congregate in the flat one time. Otherwise the floor will collapse. People still bought them for silly money even after it was headline news in the local paper. 

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On 06/12/2018 at 11:50, StuartMc said:

I'm staggered if it is a simple as the builder willing to ruin houses worth hundreds of thousands of pounds to save on cement at £25 per bag... it would be like Mercedes fitting bungee cords instead of seat belts!

Also, did they not think they would get caught out?

 

 

A motto in the building trade is "leave no corner uncut".

No-one more greedy than your average builder.

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brand new DEBTslavebox falling to pieces? just chuck a family of scumbag tenants in there on a cheeky teaser rate for christmas

 

buy some cheap nightvision on ebay - check through the windows one night (3am is deep sleep time) then if they look good and settled... BOOM just bang the rents up on em.

 

then charge them for any structural repairs if you can.

 

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The person giving the presentation was spouting bs, there's a minimum weight limit of 6.8kg set by the UCI for competition bikes so it would make no sense for Sky to shave bolts or use thinner paints as bikes are already bang on the limit.

It's an outdated archaic safety rule from years back in the era of steel frame which means that even the mid range carbon bikes you can buy straight out of the showroom today are too light to use in competition. 

 

 

Back ontopic I wouldn't consider a new build unless it was built by a smaller company and they allowed you to do spot checks on the progress or be onboard with the construction a bit like in that Grand Designs programs.

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