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Climate breakdown and housing strategy


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7 hours ago, winkie said:

Run for the hills.?

Doesn't stop them trying to get you on flood risk! Had problems getting insurance because of the river about 30' below me, since a tiny strip either side of its usual course is marked as "high flood risk". Suppose that'll get quite a few of the houses they want to build on the other side on the remains of the mill (might as well object to those just to annoy people on here, but if you must build somewhere it's about the least objectionable place around here).

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26 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

Doesn't stop them trying to get you on flood risk! Had problems getting insurance because of the river about 30' below me, since a tiny strip either side of its usual course is marked as "high flood risk". Suppose that'll get quite a few of the houses they want to build on the other side on the remains of the mill (might as well object to those just to annoy people on here, but if you must build somewhere it's about the least objectionable place around here).

So you are not obliged to pay the insurance.... sometimes you know better.....only two types of compulsory insurance, car and public liability.....the rest is choice, often costing more than the risk benefits.?

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3 hours ago, winkie said:

So you are not obliged to pay the insurance.... sometimes you know better.....only two types of compulsory insurance, car and public liability.....the rest is choice, often costing more than the risk benefits.?

Obliged to have it by the terms of the mortgage. Of course I didn't have to have a mortgage, I could've just carried on renting off parasites. And I don't have to have a car either (and I've never been responsible for anything where I've been told "Have public liability insurance or else.")

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23 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

Obliged to have it by the terms of the mortgage. Of course I didn't have to have a mortgage, I could've just carried on renting off parasites. And I don't have to have a car either (and I've never been responsible for anything where I've been told "Have public liability insurance or else.")

I am sure the mortgage owners would prefer you to pay for insurance to protect their interests.....it is not a legal requirement though......not all mortgage providers insist, although many may prefer.?

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A Fun Story About Flood Risk And How Britain Handles It.

So everyone remembers Sam Notaro right? he was the guy that bunded his house when floods were imminent so it looked like this:

Tr8DxDh.jpg

Well the thing is, this guy knew he was building on flood plain and originally tried to get PP to build on piles around four/five feet tall as is commonplace in the flood zones of the Netherlands. It is cheap and 100% effective unless the piles are overtopped and the bare earth under the house is an excellent soakaway.

He was told by the LPA that despite being on a flood plain, building a floodproof house like that was Completely Verboten. It would apparently have made his house 'unacceptably tall'. 

When he heard of floods being imminent in the next couple of days he called the Environment Agency to ask if it was legal to bund his property and was told 'permission is required for that, expect it to take about six weeks.'

shit wept.

Edited by Oki
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18 hours ago, Oki said:

He was told by the LPA that despite being on a flood plain, building a floodproof house like that was Completely Verboten. It would apparently have made his house 'unacceptably tall'. 

When he heard of floods being imminent in the next couple of days he called the Environment Agency to ask if it was legal to bund his property and was told 'permission is required for that, expect it to take about six weeks.'

Sounds like you're defending him when in reality it's just a bloody stupid place to build a house. Ghastly looking house anyway.

Edited by Riedquat
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On 17/10/2018 at 16:14, PeanutButter said:

Without getting into the whole  climate breakdown debate, are any of you planning ahead to try and mitigate disruption?

I used to want to live on the Thames but that's definitely off the cards now (same for near any waterway or shoreline). 

I can't afford to buy your average hovel, let alone a fancy bio friendly house. If I could buy land and get builders to make something for me tailore-made, then maybe.

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3 hours ago, No One said:

I can't afford to buy your average hovel, let alone a fancy bio friendly house. If I could buy land and get builders to make something for me tailore-made, then maybe.

Land prices are prohibitive, true. I suppose that's what happens when we hand over vast tracts to land banking developers and the aristocracy. 

But if someone gave you £500,000 with no strings, would your choice of property (assuming you do buy one) be at all influenced by future climate breakdown? 

 

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3 hours ago, PeanutButter said:

But if someone gave you £500,000 with no strings, would your choice of property (assuming you do buy one) be at all influenced by future climate breakdown? 

 

I would try and buy at the top of a hill, large amount of land with ability to grow food and draw water from the ground.. 

I quite fancy one of those houses where you dig into the side of a hill and then just have the door and windows showing.. earth keeps it warm in the winter and cool in the summer.. saves energy.. more secure.. blends in with nature.. 

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22 minutes ago, macca13 said:

I would try and buy at the top of a hill, large amount of land with ability to grow food and draw water from the ground.. 

I quite fancy one of those houses where you dig into the side of a hill and then just have the door and windows showing.. earth keeps it warm in the winter and cool in the summer.. saves energy.. more secure.. blends in with nature.. 

Apart from the pile of rock you've had to dig out - may as well make a house with that.

Personally I like where I live now (aforementioned plan notwithstanding - ironically enough the bit closest to my back yard is the one area I really don't mind the idea of being built on, but the idea of suburbia following me here is depressing), which is about the opposite of all of those in every way (19th century house).

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16 hours ago, PeanutButter said:

Land prices are prohibitive, true. I suppose that's what happens when we hand over vast tracts to land banking developers and the aristocracy. 

But if someone gave you £500,000 with no strings, would your choice of property (assuming you do buy one) be at all influenced by future climate breakdown? 

 

? You haven't been on HPC for long, £1/2M is an average house in London, or a large house in the countryside. To make a house green you'd need £1M minimum.

 

 

To answer your question, green tech I would consider, but before that I have other consideration that succeeds the environment, and that is that what ever I would custom build, I can pass to my children, and that they can pass this on too. So the house would be built like a fortress to last generations. 

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37 minutes ago, No One said:

? You haven't been on HPC for long, £1/2M is an average house in London, or a large house in the countryside. To make a house green you'd need £1M minimum.

 

 

To answer your question, green tech I would consider, but before that I have other consideration that succeeds the environment, and that is that what ever I would custom build, I can pass to my children, and that they can pass this on too. So the house would be built like a fortress to last generations. 

:D only since 2006 lol

Nah, 500k would get a decent piece of land outside home counties (I expect the south will be hit worse by climate breakdown anyway)

Security is a tough one - anyone read The Death of Grass by John Christopher? Old book but fascinating concept. 

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13 hours ago, macca13 said:

I would try and buy at the top of a hill, large amount of land with ability to grow food and draw water from the ground.. 

I quite fancy one of those houses where you dig into the side of a hill and then just have the door and windows showing.. earth keeps it warm in the winter and cool in the summer.. saves energy.. more secure.. blends in with nature.. 

I like those Grand Designs type hobbit homes. Bunker chic. Not sure top of a hill would allow for water access but my long term plan is to get a place with a private water supply as well as mains. Not as easy as it seems (lots of water in UK is contaminated by farming). 

We’re on course for a dismal future, IMO. Can’t hurt to have a contingency.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/oct/30/humanity-wiped-out-animals-since-1970-major-report-finds

Humanity has wiped out 60% of animals since 1970, major report finds

The huge loss is a tragedy in itself but also threatens the survival of civilisation, say the world’s leading scientists

Humanity has wiped out 60% of mammals, birds, fish and reptiles since 1970, leading the world’s foremost experts to warn that the annihilation of wildlife is now an emergency that threatens civilisation.

The new estimate of the massacre of wildlife is made in a major report produced by WWF and involving 59 scientists from across the globe. It finds that the vast and growing consumption of food and resources by the global population is destroying the web of life, billions of years in the making, upon which human society ultimately depends for clean air, water and everything else.

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On 27/10/2018 at 23:30, Oki said:

A Fun Story About Flood Risk And How Britain Handles It.

So everyone remembers Sam Notaro right? he was the guy that bunded his house when floods were imminent so it looked like this:

Tr8DxDh.jpg

Well the thing is, this guy knew he was building on flood plain and originally tried to get PP to build on piles around four/five feet tall as is commonplace in the flood zones of the Netherlands. It is cheap and 100% effective unless the piles are overtopped and the bare earth under the house is an excellent soakaway.

He was told by the LPA that despite being on a flood plain, building a floodproof house like that was Completely Verboten. It would apparently have made his house 'unacceptably tall'. 

When he heard of floods being imminent in the next couple of days he called the Environment Agency to ask if it was legal to bund his property and was told 'permission is required for that, expect it to take about six weeks.'

shit wept.

only in fuking england

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2 hours ago, PeanutButter said:

:D only since 2006 lol

Nah, 500k would get a decent piece of land outside home counties (I expect the south will be hit worse by climate breakdown anyway)

Security is a tough one - anyone read The Death of Grass by John Christopher? Old book but fascinating concept. 

post some pics of eco houses, and I'll make up my mind

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50 minutes ago, Oki said:

nuking London = ''fascinating concept"

You read the entire book since my post? Amazing!

Lil error though, the 'fascinating concept' is about the central plot point, the impact on humanity after, and here's why the book is called The Death of Grass (and not say, Let's Nuke London), all grasses catch a virus and start dying off. 

They only nuke London AFTER the grass death event, to ameliorate the inevitable mass evacuation/starvation. 

No grasses - no wheat, no rice, no barley, no oats, no bamboo, no cows, no sheep etc etc. Rather a fascinating thought from a 1950s scifi story IMO*

 

*In My Opinion

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15 hours ago, PeanutButter said:

Can’t hurt to have a contingency.

Other than a global apocalyptic event perhaps through an existential threat, or planet wide holocaust by war or something equally as horrid there isn't.

Sorry.

Just live as well as you can and ignore all the bad news.

Perhaps this Brexit mess will learn some folk how to be partially self sufficient if food becomes both scarce and expensive.

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12 hours ago, cashinmattress said:

Other than a global apocalyptic event perhaps through an existential threat, or planet wide holocaust by war or something equally as horrid there isn't.

Sorry.

Just live as well as you can and ignore all the bad news.

Perhaps this Brexit mess will learn some folk how to be partially self sufficient if food becomes both scarce and expensive.

I agree it's easier to imagine everything will stay the same forever. I wish I could do that, and fully support everyone else just ignoring any changes and just plugging on towards retirement, same as ever. Meet you back here in 20 years and we can see how it's going? 

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9 minutes ago, PeanutButter said:

I agree it's easier to imagine everything will stay the same forever. I wish I could do that, and fully support everyone else just ignoring any changes and just plugging on towards retirement, same as ever. Meet you back here in 20 years and we can see how it's going? 

Everything will stay the same forever is just the opposite extreme from global apocalypse, arguing that the latter won't happen isn't the same as claiming that the former will. There's a tendency these days for people to act like you're supporting an opposite extreme position if you disagree with something. It could do with ending.

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On 30/10/2018 at 09:17, PeanutButter said:

Security is a tough one - anyone read The Death of Grass by John Christopher? Old book but fascinating concept. 

A superb and thought provoking book.  It was part of a cluster of dystopian/scifi novels popular in the post 2nd world war era like '1984', 'One', 'Brave New World' and 'Day of The Triffids' .  I read it in the 1980's and it is still haunts me from time to time - everyone should read 'The Death of Grass'.

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  • 1 month later...

Updating for G20

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/dec/02/world-verge-climate-catastophe

Quote

 

Even then the seas will not stop rising, Jevrejeva added. “They will continue to climb for centuries even after greenhouse-gas levels have been stabilised. We could experience the highest-ever global sea-level rise in the history of human civilisation.”

Vast tracts of prime real estate will be destroyed – at a time when land will be needed with unprecedented desperation. Earth’s population stands at seven billion today and is predicted to rise to nine billion by 2050 and settle at over 11 billion by 2100 – when climate change will have wrecked major ecosystems and turned farmlands to dust bowls.

Unfortunately many experts believe Earth’s population will actually peak well beyond 11 billion. “It could reach 15 billion,” said Sarah Harper, of Oxford’s Institute of Population Ageing. “All sorts of factors suggest women, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, will still want to have relatively high numbers of children and this might keep the world’s population approaching 15 billion rather than 12 billion.”

The world will have double its present numbers – but with hugely reduced areas of fertile land to provide food. We will be living in a shrunken, scorched planet bursting with human beings. Somaliland gives a grim vision of this future.

In the past few years climate change has killed 70% of its livestock and forced tens of thousands of families to flee from its scorched interior to live in refugee camps. “You can touch it, the climate change, in Somaliland. It is real. It is here,” the country’s environment minister, Shukri Ismail Bandare, said in the Financial Times last week.

 

So my question again, if you're not planning on dying in the next 20 years, how are you planning for future climate chaos?

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