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Climate breakdown and housing strategy

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Without getting into the whole  climate breakdown debate, are any of you planning ahead to try and mitigate disruption?

I used to want to live on the Thames but that's definitely off the cards now (same for near any waterway or shoreline). 

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Nothing really.

Do as a matter of course check the flood maps before going to see a house. It's free and can help reduce any nasty surprises. Also council maps for TPO as well.

Edit : Eplanning can also tell you who is at war with who,, and whether or not if you are planning on extending after buying whether or not it is likely to happen.

Edited by Gigantic Purple Slug

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Nope. I'm already near enough a watercourse to be a high flood risk according to the insurance (despite it being 30' below me, apparently the canal next to me doesn't count though).

I'd avoid a house on a floodplain regardless. Ditto anywhere near the sea prone to coastal erosion (even a mile or two away may be too close).

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58 minutes ago, PeanutButter said:

Without getting into the whole  climate breakdown debate, are any of you planning ahead to try and mitigate disruption?

I used to want to live on the Thames but that's definitely off the cards now (same for near any waterway or shoreline). 

Hit up your local university library for historic geology and fluvial flooding on your chosen area. No doubt they have it, and if not will be able to get you something.

Shame that developers & councils don't do something as basic as this. They fvck it up all the time as bags on money seem to draw their gaze away from common sense.

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Shame that developers & councils don't do something as basic as this. They fvck it up all the time as bags on money seem to draw their gaze away from common sense.

Because a lot of land on floodplains is in a great location from every other point of view, and most people do not check before buying houses.

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A lot of older Victorian properties tend to be built away from flood risk area so I suspect a safer bet.

In terms of rising sea levels,Scotland might be a safer bet than coastal southern England as it's rising due to rebound of the retreating glaciers, while the SE is counter sinking, i believe.

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1 hour ago, nightowl said:

A lot of older Victorian properties tend to be built away from flood risk area so I suspect a safer bet.

In terms of rising sea levels,Scotland might be a safer bet than coastal southern England as it's rising due to rebound of the retreating glaciers, while the SE is counter sinking, i believe.

As a rule of thumb, the UK is sinking in the East and rising in the West but these rises and falls are not significant in human terms.  What is probably more important is the proximity of rivers and low level coastal areas coupled with erosion.  Our East coast is eroding in places and has been subject to severe flooding on numerous occasions but 1953 was the worst in terms of lives lost.  The 1953 event was caused by a high tide and a storm surge in the North Sea.  The Netherlands was affected much more than the UK and as a result started on the Delta Works project which makes the Thames Barrier look a bit low key.

For those interested on how you can manage water in a densely populated country its worth reading this:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flood_control_in_the_Netherlands

Edited by dougless

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15 hours ago, Neverwhere said:

The British Geological Survey are currently engaged in research on climate change and geohazards, (for instance drought-driven subsidence), so that might be worth checking back on.

Thinking about how easy a property is to cool in the summer is probably worth considering more now than it was previously as well.

Useful, thanks. The heat level in our upstairs this summer was insane (south facing) and we've stuck in as much high quality insulation as possible so the heat aspect is definitely a future factor I'm considering. Also been reading about more frequent high winds (shall we all get into the fence business?) and how our mismanaged private water supply leaks away our water stores until we end up in drought conditions. Typical. 

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I am not sure I would get to obsessed with weather issues beyond flood plain or erosion on coastlines.  At risk of falling foul of the first post request there's a lot of hysteria, hype, cherry picking, alarmism in the MSM and general 'noise' surrounding this topic making an informed calculated judgement hard.

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22 hours ago, PropertyMania said:

Or just buy on a floodplain as vested interests usually powerful enough to get the taxpayer to foot the bill for compensation / prevention infrastructure. "I'm an idiot" is a legit defence these days

No one who was not insured during the last flood was compensated by the govt or anyone else.  

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Rising water levels will occur over a very extended period of time.  If I was buying near a river I may think about it as there is always a flood risk, but other than that I just get on with it.  I am positive by nature and do not worry about something that may possibly happen sometime somewhere somehow at some point in the future when I may or may not still be living there.

 

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5 hours ago, nightowl said:

I am not sure I would get to obsessed with weather issues beyond flood plain or erosion on coastlines.  At risk of falling foul of the first post request there's a lot of hysteria, hype, cherry picking, alarmism in the MSM and general 'noise' surrounding this topic making an informed calculated judgement hard.

I'm completely happy for anyone not concerned about it to remain unconcerned. Me, I like to plan a few steps ahead. Can't help it, just the way my brain works. 

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1 minute ago, PeanutButter said:

I'm completely happy for anyone not concerned about it to remain unconcerned. Me, I like to plan a few steps ahead. Can't help it, just the way my brain works. 

LOL I share the same thinking strategically  brain I think (or at least attempting to think like that) but find it hard to get suitable objective information. Its frustrating I know.

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9 hours ago, PeanutButter said:

Useful, thanks.

You're welcome :)

9 hours ago, PeanutButter said:

The heat level in our upstairs this summer was insane (south facing) and we've stuck in as much high quality insulation as possible so the heat aspect is definitely a future factor I'm considering.

Where have you been insulating?

I think there is potentially a bit of a problem in the UK in general with disproportionate loft insulation, (though this may be dictated by the underlying design of the property), as any heat in the house can get trapped under it as much in the summer as in the winter, so if you have a well insulated loft and a less well insulated south-facing aspect that could explain why the heat built up to such a high level over the course of the summer?

Something that a friend of mine did which apparently worked really well was buy super-insulated blinds for all of the windows and make sure that they were all down during the day and only up during the evenings and at night.

(Not particularly helpful if you're at home and want to use those rooms, but easy enough when you're out and about.)

Deciduous climbers, trees and shrubs - as long as they're carefully chosen to make sure that they're varieties which won't cause any damage to the building - could also help by providing some summer shade for the south-facing aspect.

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9 minutes ago, Neverwhere said:

I think there is potentially a bit of a problem in the UK in general with disproportionate loft insulation, (though this may be dictated by the underlying design of the property), as any heat in the house can get trapped under it as much in the summer as in the winter, so if you have a well insulated loft and a less well insulated south-facing aspect that could explain why the heat built up to such a high level over the course of the summer?

Loft insulation should help keep it cooler in summer. The roof will get more sun than the walls (at the right times of day at any rate) and is usually made of something fairly dark. Try going up in the loft during those times! That may be balanced out somewhat by an uninsulated roof that'll lose some of that heat at night, but on balance the insulation probably pays off in summer, and definitely does in winter.

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1 hour ago, Riedquat said:

Loft insulation should help keep it cooler in summer. The roof will get more sun than the walls (at the right times of day at any rate) and is usually made of something fairly dark. Try going up in the loft during those times! That may be balanced out somewhat by an uninsulated roof that'll lose some of that heat at night, but on balance the insulation probably pays off in summer, and definitely does in winter.

Sorry I probably phrased that badly above, I wasn't meaning to suggest that the loft should be uninsulated, but that other aspects of the property (especially south-facing) may also need to be if one of the aims is to keep the property cool (and not just cooler) in summer.

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https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/oct/26/rising-sea-levels-will-claim-homes-around-english-coast-report-warns

 

Quote

 

The report also found that 520,000 properties are already in areas with significant coastal flood risk. However, this may treble to 1.5m by the 2080s without action.

Currently, 8,900 properties are at risk from coastal erosion and in 2014 the Environment Agency calculated that 7,000 homes, worth more than £1bn, would fall into the sea this century. But the CCC report found that in the 2080s another 100,000 properties would be at risk of sliding into the sea.

As well as properties, key infrastructure is also at risk from the sea level rise and bigger storms being driven by climate change. In the 2080s, 1,600km of major roads, 650km of railway line and 92 stations will be at risk, the CCC found. Ports, power stations and gas terminals are also in danger. A further risk is toxic waste from old landfill sites falling into the sea as the coast is eroded; a 2016 study found 1,000 such sites at risk.

 

 

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On 18/10/2018 at 22:26, Neverwhere said:

Sorry I probably phrased that badly above, I wasn't meaning to suggest that the loft should be uninsulated, but that other aspects of the property (especially south-facing) may also need to be if one of the aims is to keep the property cool (and not just cooler) in summer.

We don't have a loft, it's a 60s house. Definitely going for thermal blinds before summer kicks in next year (we've only been here 6 months). Might start seeing more places with outside shutters as the climate heats up. Preventing the radiation getting inside is easier than cooling the place once it's in. 

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13 hours ago, PeanutButter said:

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2018/oct/26/rising-sea-levels-will-claim-homes-around-english-coast-report-warns

Quote

The report also found that 520,000 properties are already in areas with significant coastal flood risk. However, this may treble to 1.5m by the 2080s without action.

Currently, 8,900 properties are at risk from coastal erosion and in 2014 the Environment Agency calculated that 7,000 homes, worth more than £1bn, would fall into the sea this century.

FreeTrader had a great thread on current coastal erosion and house prices/sales:

 

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