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Lurkerbelow

The Chickens are coming home to roost for the Tories.

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Everything that has been predicted is coming to pass and it looks like the slowly boiling Tory frog is finally realizing that, yes, the water its in is boiling - so now its time to have meetings where all solutions are up for discussion except the one where they actually make housing cheaper.

Quote

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-45699269

Would younger voters back Tories for £10,000?

"Kids say 'I believe in Conservative things, but I can't vote Tory, they're evil'. How do we deal with that situation?"

Carly, a former teacher from Watford, knows what it's like to belong to a political tribe that dare not speak its name.

"Being a Conservative teacher, you learn to keep very quiet," she told a packed meeting at the party conference.

"Walking into a teachers' room is like walking into a socialist convention."

Her fellow sufferers - let's call them "Tories Anonymous" - nodded in sympathy and applauded. They knew what she was talking about.

"I am afraid of commenting on my opinions about things on social media. I even say I'm voting Labour," said a man from the West Midlands.

Another woman said she had tried to organise a talk by Health Secretary Matt Hancock - a man so down with the kids he even has his own app - only to be told by her contact that, actually, it might not be such a great idea.

"She said 'my entire university house is Conservative but I can't own up to it and I can't possibly have him come and talk to us'."

But don't all young people go through a rebellious left-wing phase before growing up and becoming a Tory, asked one man at the Resolution Foundation meeting.

No, he was told by the MPs on the panel, it was different this time.

"Not enough people feel they have a stake in this country," said former Education Secretary Justine Greening.

The dream of getting on to the property ladder - something that had sustained her when she was growing up in Rotherham - was now out of reach for many young people, she said.

And the Conservatives were never going to win another election if they did not take action to win back a "lost generation" of voters.

The key number was 47 - below that age the majority of people vote Labour, above it they vote Tory. All the stats suggested that figure was getting higher all the time, the meeting was told.

There were some things the Tories could do immediately to win back younger voters, said MP George Freeman, such as scrapping the 6% interest rate on student loans and building far more affordable homes.

But it was also about "tone". Take this party conference - it was too boring and corporate, he said. It should be more like a music festival.

"For a young community, being a culture-free zone in an age of culture politics is very toxic. We begin to look like the besuited bank managers of austerity, who have no vision of the spirit and the soul that makes life worth living.

"And if we become like that I think they will treat us like that."

The Conservatives had to speak out more against corporate greed and were in danger of looking like "the landlords' party, not the tenants' party", said Mr Freeman, a former policy adviser to Theresa May, who was now on a roll.

Why not let top universities charge more than £9,000 in tuition fees - but only if they offer zero-fee bursaries for "bright kids from low income backgrounds"?

Why not set up a work experience scheme for "blue-collar youngsters" to experience life in Africa, to be funded by the Department for International Development?

Then there was Brexit.

Journalist Rachel Sylvester's suggestion that the Tories get behind a second EU referendum had been earlier been met with boos and jeers from Tory members in the room.

Mr Freeman said he was no fan of Brexit, but his party should be sounding a bit more positive about it.

"Brexit could still be a moment of profound and inspiring renewal. But it's starting to look, after two years, like a street alley-cat fight between lawyers, bureaucrats and people hoping to wrestle the crown off the PM."

The "religious zealotry" of Conservative hard Brexiteers looks "completely weird to a generation under 45 and I fear will lead us to Corbyn having the keys to Brexit Britain", he said.

But perhaps the most radical idea was proposed by the organisers of the meeting, the Resolution Foundation think-tank.

Why not give all young people £10,000?

This "citizen's inheritance" would be made available to all under-30s in work from 2030, but it would be phased in from 2020, to be used for housing deposits, skills training, pensions savings or "entrepreneurship".

"That more than doubles the wealth of the majority of people aged 30," said Lord Willetts, the think-tank's chairman.

If Conservatives wanted to get more people on the property ladder "we need to provide some means of getting them started", he added.

His defence of the policy had been prompted by a complaint from the audience.

This sounds exactly like the sort of "moon-on-stick", unfunded promise that Jeremy Corbyn would come up with, the Tory party member had thundered.

He looked like he was still in his teens.

 

Edited by Lurkerbelow

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£10k might attract young voters but it would crater the older votership who would see themselves as having paid for it.  They would also resent never having received such a thing themselves.

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1 hour ago, ElPapasito said:

Another typical and loony establishment idea.  Give £10k per young person and watch house prices and tuition fees and rentals rise by £10k.

This.

What is wrong with these people? Anything but deal with the issue staring them in the face.

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There's cross-party consensus on this asset bubble, the only differences are on the accompanying austerity. Corbyn might do people's QE or a 'citizen's inheritance' but the Tories aren't many steps from helicopter money either.

After 2008, most of the incumbent governing parties lost to their opposition, no matter whether they were right or left. Then everyone signed up to the same recovery policies, no matter left or right.

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no need to meddle. 

its all going to adjust on its very own. and here is why

 

the ftse is averaging 3.4% dividen yield per year + rising by a similar amount. 

 

housing is not and its a lot more hassle than looking at a screen every once in a while and staring at your bank account. 

 

and thats it, thats why. the housing boom only ever worked as a financial investment if prices kept rising on a scale faster than debt. but that just aint the case no more, and being a landlord is a very poor place to put your money. all that decorating and interest rate rises was only worth it at about 10% a year house price inflation. its not worth it anymore 

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6 minutes ago, A third of everything said:

I'll purposely vote Labour if the Tories go ahead with this... yes I'm spiteful but you don't turn 31 and all of a sudden find a sodding money tree

i thought the same but i got £4k free monies from the help to buy ISA so the free monies is there if you want it.
Any free monies will always be tied to being forced to use it to buy a house.

they would not want you to stick it in a bitcoin or gold afterall. 

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2 hours ago, ElPapasito said:

Another typical and loony establishment idea.  Give £10k per young person and watch house prices and tuition fees and rentals rise by £10k.

Exactly...more money chasing the same restricted supply of housing. Give youngsters £10k and it will flow through into the pockets of old home owners. And for this reason I fear they will be evil enough to do it. It is not far removed from HTB in concept.

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"If Conservatives wanted to get more people on the property ladder "we need to provide some means of getting them started", he added."

In 1990 that £10k would be £4628

£4628 would have got you much further along in terms of housing back then. Therefore, given that house prices ARE NOT included in inflation and house prices have increased by 600% or so, then in terms of spending it on the "property ladder" it's more like £1k or less (albeit not for things which have only risen with inflation, but as I say in terms of housing it is though).

In cockney rhyming slang that's 2 Monkeys.

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4 hours ago, rantnrave said:

Similar article, with an update from the Question Time Tax Credit Lady.

https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/oct/01/theresa-may-voters-tory-policies-labour

From that article - something that could easily be fixed if they had the will, but then it would show the sham lie of the employment figures (i.e. all the people who don't have full-time work but would like it)

At first business went well, but the economy in her hometown of Folkestone is as moribund as anywhere else in non-metropolitan Britain. She’s just closed her nail business and works in a local shop on a zero-hours contract, getting eight to 12 hours of shifts a week. She needs more, but the manager says the company will never give her 16 hours because they don’t want to pay employers’ national insurance

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39 minutes ago, dpg50000 said:

From that article - something that could easily be fixed if they had the will, but then it would show the sham lie of the employment figures (i.e. all the people who don't have full-time work but would like it)

At first business went well, but the economy in her hometown of Folkestone is as moribund as anywhere else in non-metropolitan Britain. She’s just closed her nail business and works in a local shop on a zero-hours contract, getting eight to 12 hours of shifts a week. She needs more, but the manager says the company will never give her 16 hours because they don’t want to pay employers’ national insurance

She dosnt want FT work FFS.

She's after the magic 16h to qualify for the browny bonus of tax credits.

Ive updated tax credit sad face thread.

 

 

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I have totally finished with the Tory party even though I am light years away from being a Labour supporter as well. Theresa May is light years from the revolution that is needed in this country, far too many of the working electorate working way over 40 hours per week with working families putting in close on 100 hours per week are just clinging on by their fingernails.

Every time I hear May make noises they are just empty gestures and not enough anyway, "We are going to" is all we hear as they chip chip chip away at the least well off and average earners. Since the financial crisis in 2008 policies from 99% of the politicians has been to look after the comfortable top 10%, maybe 15%, to keep house prices high, to keep cheap slave cheap labour from around the world on tap for business.

I will be voting, my home for my vote should be the Tories as a hard working businessman working long hours and paying my way in life as well as my taxes I might add, but no, it's going to Corbyns lunatic party. I am not wasting time on the Tories anymore, I have better chances by letting Corbynn f*** this country over and then be part of the clean up. I am even hearing ex right wing Tories suggesting that Corbyn is a better for many, even dirty old Archer is suggesting it.

 

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11 hours ago, Noallegiance said:

I was dismayed but unsurprised to hear JRM hail HTB as the sort of thing that needs to be kept going.

I used to like him until this morning.

HTB is soviet style central planning. And at the same time they bleat about Labour's moderate & progressive costed plans as 'Hard Left' policies. You couldn't make it up.

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13 hours ago, spyguy said:

These are Browns chickens.

The Tories have been in power for 8.5 years now. That's long enough to at least see an improvement in the housing prospects of younger people if the right policies were put in place.

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Just now, Dorkins said:

The Tories have been in power for 8.5 years now. That's long enough to at least see an improvement in the housing prospects of younger people if the right policies were put in place.

Not quite.

Colatiion for 5, COns for 3.

Brexit was too ambitious.

Colation spent its time rtying to deal with Browns run-away UKGOV spendign machine.

The Gdiot and crew di the Brexit vote, which fuxed up the next lot.

 

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12 hours ago, Wayward said:

Exactly...more money chasing the same restricted supply of housing. Give youngsters £10k and it will flow through into the pockets of old home owners. And for this reason I fear they will be evil enough to do it. It is not far removed from HTB in concept.

+1

 

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3 minutes ago, spyguy said:

Not quite.

Colatiion for 5, COns for 3.

Brexit was too ambitious.

Colation spent its time rtying to deal with Browns run-away UKGOV spendign machine.

The Gdiot and crew di the Brexit vote, which fuxed up the next lot.

 

The problem with Brexit was the UK voted for Brexit and then for people didn't believe in it to put it through.  A bit like voting to remain and making Nigel Farrage prime minister.

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  • 152 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
      • up 2.5%
      • up 5%



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