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8 minutes ago, Sausage said:

The other factor is if we leave and rent via agency, the fees (£800 ish) will be the same as a years increased rent.

Are the fees that high? Different agents have different fees so maybe some lower ones about. Last time we took out a new tenancy it cost about £300 - about 7 years ago. This was with a large agency with branches across the SE. 

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On ‎20‎/‎08‎/‎2018 at 17:27, Sausage said:

Had message from landlord. Rent is going up from 825 to 900 pcm if we stay past this contract (ends in two months). House is shabby, no central heating, but we're settled, 2 young kids 5 & 7. Don't want to move... But if we do, he'd be forced to do it up to get the next tenant I reckon.

 

FFS

Are they pressing you for a decision? If not, then nearer the time perhaps you could say you'd be prepared to stay at the same rent. Otherwise he's faced with the prospect of a void while he looks for another tenant who may not be prepared to pay more.

 

Also I'd be careful about expected buying timescales. This can drag, so you may have to move again.

Edited by Kosmin
Typo corrected
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9 hours ago, Sour Mash said:

For all the bravado here about landlords not being able to raise rents and to tell any landlord who tries, to take a walk, the simple fact is that moving is a major, major hassle and expense for many renters (especially if settled with kids) and they are vulnerable to being squeezed.

Landlords cannot raise rents to reflect their costs precisely because individual landlords have all of the power in the relationship.

They’ve already done all the cost raising they can get away with. 

This isn’t bravado it’s economics.

Of course, economics is about aggregates and averages.  It says nothing about individual cases, which vary according to people’s circumstances and tolerance for hassle.

It’s not the case that landlords can’t raise rents. They certainly can and will. But they’ll do that anyway, regardless of any increases in rates or costs.

Edited by BorrowToLeech
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3 hours ago, Kosmin said:

Are they pressing you for a decision? If not, then nearer the time perhaps you could say you'd be prepared to stay at the same rent. Otherwise he's faced with the prospect of a void while he looks for another tenant who may not be prepared to pay more.

 

Also I'd be careful about expected buying timescales. This can drag, so you may have to move again.

Agreed - a clever landlord knows that with any change of tenant, there is an element of risk, and normally at *least* one month's void. If the new tenant turns out to be a freeloader, they could be faced with a year of getting no rent at all, whilst having to fork out for expensive court battles, and probably the place being left in an absolute state when they are finally evicted. 

It is simply not worth rocking the boat to *possibly* get a few more quid out of a good tenant. Even if you don't leave immediately, you'll probably start looking around, and with tenant fees being banned shortly, it will be a lot cheaper to move. 

You might find that just by making noises about possibly looking elsewhere, they might cave in.

All I had to do was ask how much notice I needed to give and my landlord at the time backtracked immediately (although admittedly, this was in the middle of the GFC in 2008 and  I could pick up a place on the same street, with an extra bedroom, for £25 a month less than I was paying. They cited an increase in their costs (sound familiar?) due to the increase in interest rates at the time, but I pointed out that their financial problems were no concern of mine.  

When prices start to collapse, so will rents. 

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On 20/08/2018 at 18:27, Sausage said:

Had message from landlord. Rent is going up from 825 to 900 pcm if we stay past this contract (ends in two months). House is shabby, no central heating, but we're settled, 2 young kids 5 & 7. Don't want to move... But if we do, he'd be forced to do it up to get the next tenant I reckon.

 

FFS

I have to cello tape my double glazing in the winter as the curtains move when the wind blows.. I glued my tap back together, toilets cracked (not me was already like that) internal electrical sockets on the outside of the house.. outside lights mounted upside down so fill with water when it rains as cable gland is on the top.. 

my cuz can’t turn more than 3 things on at once or the electric trips.. her only fire exit a double glazed patio door (converted house to studio) gets stuck so she would burn to death in a fire..garden full of rubble from the terrible conversion done on the cheap.. 

it is modern day slavery.. live in poverty for £1500 or live on the street..your choice.. 

 

what if tomorrow morning we wake up and bill gates has bought all the U.K. supermarkets.. 

a loaf of bread is now £50..  

you have 2 choices.. buy food or starve?

Basic needs should be ringfenced. If you want a productive happy, safe population basic needs should never be financially leveraged to profit the greedy and mostly stupid who could never earn what the take from tenants..  

Edited by macca13
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On 20/08/2018 at 17:27, Sausage said:

Had message from landlord. Rent is going up from 825 to 900 pcm if we stay past this contract (ends in two months). House is shabby, no central heating, but we're settled, 2 young kids 5 & 7. Don't want to move... But if we do, he'd be forced to do it up to get the next tenant I reckon.

 

FFS

Not much to say on this except hope the c*** rots in hell and all those like him.

Good luck with you and your family, you deserve better

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shame there is no single easy way to set up house moves, the full service.

Moving, decorating, and moving all your documents and post to the new address, setting up your gas, electric, water, council tax, broadband etc etc

The thing of service when a load of people turn up, and have you fully moved in over 1 day and set up and running. Would make renters much more liquid, but is that a good thing? would that actually act to drive rents up?

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6 minutes ago, jiltedjen said:

shame there is no single easy way to set up house moves, the full service.

Moving, decorating, and moving all your documents and post to the new address, setting up your gas, electric, water, council tax, broadband etc etc

Regarding post, you can pay the Post Office to forward post to your new address. You see what post has been sent direct to your new address and what has been addressed to your old address. This lasts several months, so gives you an opportunity to update the addresses you forgot after your move.

You probably could pay someone to help organise your move, but I expect it would be quite expensive.

7 minutes ago, jiltedjen said:

The thing of service when a load of people turn up, and have you fully moved in over 1 day and set up and running. Would make renters much more liquid, but is that a good thing? would that actually act to drive rents up?

It would drive rents down. If it's easier to move and hence renters choose to move more, they'd be moving to pay less not more.

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13 hours ago, Kosmin said:

Are they pressing you for a decision? If not, then nearer the time perhaps you could say you'd be prepared to stay at the same rent. Otherwise he's faced with the prospect of a void while he looks for another tenant who may not be prepared to pay more.

 

Also I'd be careful about expected buying timescales. This can drag, so you may have to move again.

I agree with this and that it's a good idea to hold on as long as you can before saying anything IF you do decide to stay on, on whatever terms.

That said, I really think it might be worth biting the bullet and finding somewhere to rent that you and your family are comfortable in and at a rent you find manageable, settling in and envisaging yourselves being there for a year. As Kosmin says, the process of buying can take ages even once you've found somewhere to buy. But apart from that, while you're looking for somewhere, it would be great to be doing so in a relaxed, unpressured frame of mind. You probably won't be making your best decisions if you're going home to a freezing, expensive flat at the end of cold February evenings of house-hunting. If you're looking from a cosy, reasonably priced place where the kids are happy, you'll really be thinking about what's best for you all, you'll be more picky. I'm sure it is a huge hassle to move when you've got kids, it's a pain anyway, but perhaps you could see it as an opportunity to have a good clear-out and get all your things in order so it's less of a hassle when you make the next move into your permanent home.

I think I wouldn't be comfortable with a landlord who has demanded so much additional rent because I'd know that they were taking advantage of my vulnerability in terms of my family - he knows you've got kids in a local school and what that means, he's behaving very cynically.

Whatever you decide, all the best with it.

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10 hours ago, macca13 said:

Basic needs should be ringfenced. If you want a productive happy, safe population basic needs should never be financially leveraged to profit the greedy and mostly stupid who could never earn what the take from tenants..  

Nah, this is the low IQ opinion. Doing this hands even more power to the big players and worsens living conditions for the average person.

Why do you think the Soviet Union was so so utterly totally ishtty? People like you would have been supporting ever more State intervention.

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On 20/08/2018 at 17:27, Sausage said:

Had message from landlord. Rent is going up from 825 to 900 pcm if we stay past this contract (ends in two months). House is shabby, no central heating, but we're settled, 2 young kids 5 & 7. Don't want to move... But if we do, he'd be forced to do it up to get the next tenant I reckon.

 

FFS

Price is a negotiation. Why not counteroffer £750 if things remain the same and £825 if he fixes everything currently wrong with the property?

He is free to demand what he likes; you are free to offer what you like. He does not hold all or even most of the cards here. Remain cordial, but firm.

If he ends up being a douche about it, then you were going to be forced out at some point anyway. Might as well bite the bullet now while it will maximise his pain.

Out of curiosity, are you a bloke or a woman?

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11 hours ago, oatbake said:

Agreed - a clever landlord knows that with any change of tenant, there is an element of risk, and normally at *least* one month's void. If the new tenant turns out to be a freeloader, they could be faced with a year of getting no rent at all, whilst having to fork out for expensive court battles, and probably the place being left in an absolute state when they are finally evicted.

Very true happened to a BTL landlord I know, no rent for a year and other problems, all because they wanted a reliable tenant to pay more and they found a different place.

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3 minutes ago, Locke said:

Price is a negotiation. Why not counteroffer £750 if things remain the same and £825 if he fixes everything currently wrong with the property?

He is free to demand what he likes; you are free to offer what you like. He does not hold all or even most of the cards here. Remain cordial, but firm.

If he ends up being a douche about it, then you were going to be forced out at some point anyway. Might as well bite the bullet now while it will maximise his pain.

Out of curiosity, are you a bloke or a woman?

Probably the best answer so far.

It does depends on your area and the rental market there. My area has not really seen any rent increases since the crash, and I've never had a rent increase or been kicked out in my renting history, although I've moved around quite a bit and always avoided certain places.

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17 hours ago, Sausage said:

Lived in tidier but identical house 3 doors up, same landlord (well his parents, they passed over the reins) since 2011. Moved to this one in 2014, long story, not out of choice! Rent has gone from 730 ... 800 ... 825 since 2011. Has been a bit below market rate, and no inventory/protected deposit which I accepted as a useful bargaining tool for future use. Now though 900 is bang on market rate, but for a poor house.

 

He's not using a a deposit protection service? Do you have an AST? I'd investigate what happens if he isn't using a protection service, if I were you. I seem to remember it involves lots of refunded rent, no eviction and no rent to pay until it gets sorted. Check out the rental forum for more help but I think you could have your solution right there.

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34 minutes ago, Pytyr said:

He's not using a a deposit protection service? Do you have an AST? I'd investigate what happens if he isn't using a protection service, if I were you. I seem to remember it involves lots of refunded rent, no eviction and no rent to pay until it gets sorted. Check out the rental forum for more help but I think you could have your solution right there.

I did wonder if the OP was just making things up as he goes along. Giving the deposit protection disclosure he definitely has the upper hand since it is an offence to not use a service, and the OP could claim substantial compensation if he wished to do so.

So OP, just lay out the facts to your landlord, maybe get a rent reduction or keep it the same and stay there until you've purchased.

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4 minutes ago, Captain Kirk said:

I did wonder if the OP was just making things up as he goes along. Giving the deposit protection disclosure he definitely has the upper hand since it is an offence to not use a service, and the OP could claim substantial compensation if he wished to do so.

So OP, just lay out the facts to your landlord, maybe get a rent reduction or keep it the same and stay there until you've purchased.

Or... Go talk to his local housing office, Shelter or CA to find out his options. Report the LL to the authorities, stop paying rent, pocket the rent refund (it's 6 months back rent I think) and go buy his house with a boosted deposit.

Any LL that rents unsuitable homes to families deserve everything coming their way. I would also assume he's avoiding tax so a polite word with HMRC may not go amiss.

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48 minutes ago, Captain Kirk said:

I did wonder if the OP was just making things up as he goes along. Giving the deposit protection disclosure he definitely has the upper hand since it is an offence to not use a service, and the OP could claim substantial compensation if he wished to do so.

So OP, just lay out the facts to your landlord, maybe get a rent reduction or keep it the same and stay there until you've purchased.

Why would I make things up?

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