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winkie

What a load of rubbish

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Plastic......do we need to use as much as we do?

Where does our sorted for recycling plastic go?....is it actually ever recycled? can it be recycled?

How long has this been going on, without us knowing about it?

Is it time we woke up to the fact that we are using far too much of the stuff, start to refuse buying the stuff wrapped up in so much of the stuff......sentiments are changing, it can't go on if we care about the world we live in, and the future of the people not yet born.....a plastic bubble wrap bubble?;)

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Again this is another perfect example of why rules constantly need updating to make markets do the right thing. We all know we need to address the plastic problem, but until there is some restriction on plastic packaging and or levy it will continue to drag on. 

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Plastic, its effects on the earth and recycling it weren't that high on our list of priorities until China refused to accept our waste any more. Since then media, corporations, governments, celebrities and the establishment have coordinated around a sustained campaign aimed at behavioural change on a societal basis.

As admirable as the ends may be, it's unmistakably propaganda at work and almost all those moralising now didn't care for as long as the landfills were on someone else's land.

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Plastic is not poisonous, it is not toxic, neither is it  a source of pollution, it is litter , that's all.

Keep calm and tidy up..._

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that's not true, it can be incredibly damaging to the environment. Coastal birds eat it and apparently it reacts as a hormone adversely affecting them. And then obviously they starve.

microbeads again for similar reasons harm wildlife.

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14 minutes ago, DiggerUK said:

Plastic is not poisonous, it is not toxic, neither is it  a source of pollution, it is litter , that's all.

Keep calm and tidy up..._

Really do hope that is sarcasm, for your sake.

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This is well worth a watch, shows just what a sham the plastics recycling industry is, with private firms being rewarded for 'recycling' plastic that's just being sent to foreign landfill.

 

(Incidentally, I can remember watching a similar report at least 10 years ago)

 

 

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Will continue to help out by washing plastic and tin containers sorting the rubbish out......sorting plastics is not recycling plastics.

Will look to purchase products where the manufacturers and retailers have tried to cut back on the plastic they have used in the past.....would like to see food and non food products sold by weight and volume put directly into the customers own reuseable containers.

Out of sight is not out of mind.......things have got to change.😉

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9 hours ago, whome_yesyou said:

Really do hope that is sarcasm, for your sake.

We have accumulated an assortment of toys for grandchildren when they stay over, many made from plastic. It causes no emergency calls to Salisbury hospital when the babies chew on their (plastic) teething rings either.

Plastic is not toxic, it is not pollution, it is not poisonous......it's a litter problem that needs tidying up..._

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6 minutes ago, DiggerUK said:

We have accumulated an assortment of toys for grandchildren when they stay over, many made from plastic. It causes no emergency calls to Salisbury hospital when the babies chew on their (plastic) teething rings either.

Plastic is not toxic, it is not pollution, it is not poisonous......it's a litter problem that needs tidying up..._

Children's toys are very recyclable.......plastic is pollution when not disposed of properly, when dumped at  sea for example......with our name on it.😌

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The plastic problem is a litter problem. It just needs addressing and sorting. Many animals do die as a result of rubbish dumping, both on land and sea, it is not a planetary catastrophe in the making.

If we all swallowed a lego brick a day for the rest of our lives, the only consequence would be funny shapes in our poo.

This is another example of eco catastrophists crying wolf, or should that be polar bear. Calm down and tidy up..._

 

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Strange how the end consumer rather than the producer is deemed to be the problem here.

I dont remember shoppers demonstrating on the streets demanding that items that previously came in glass containers, paper bags, cardboard and grease proof paper be wrapped in layers of plastic often more impenetrable than tank armour.

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2 hours ago, DiggerUK said:

We have accumulated an assortment of toys for grandchildren when they stay over, many made from plastic. It causes no emergency calls to Salisbury hospital when the babies chew on their (plastic) teething rings either.

Plastic is not toxic, it is not pollution, it is not poisonous......it's a litter problem that needs tidying up..._

It might not be toxic or poisonous but you try eating a diet that consists of a majority of plastic and see how you fair. This is the problem with it being concentrated in the marine food chain from plankton upward.

 

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I was actually quite heartened by the news that apparently 90% of the oceans plastic pollution comes from only 10 rivers... surely it can't be that difficult to target and clean up 10 rivers?

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I used to work in the waste business, members of my family still do.

The industry changed from disposing waste in a cheap an efficient way to essentially becoming accountants. This is because of the government's landfill tax. It steadily increases year after year with virtually zero publicity. When was the last time you heard about the land fill tax in the media, or mentioned by a politician?

Now, everyone in the business is just finding a way to justify avoiding the tax. They sound like accountants, moving waste and money around to avoid the taxes. A lot of total crap is sold as sorted waste. No wonder the Chinese banned it.

The industry is very corrupt to. There are a lot of one man bands. Offers of bribes, threats, places being set on fire, other peoples machines being smashed up and so on. Never make enemies with a man who has access to a landfill site. They will never find your body if you end up in there. The business attracts a lot of organised crime. I imagine the industry has been cleaned up somewhat since. I know of a bloke, just a machine driver in the yard. He paid his mortgage off nicking bales of "recycled" metal cans on the night shift. He was sacked but not prosecuted.

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I had a pint outside in Hyde park recently, by the serpentine - served in a plastic pint cup that carried a print saying "I am not a normal plastic cup" or something like that. I googled the company and found out it was made of PLA which is a type of plastic made from organic base.

Looked and felt exactly like any other plastic pint cup I have come across but apparently this cup when exposed to elements (landfill/composted) it breaks down completely in 6-24months.

I really cannot believe that we havent banned normal plastics for at least all the ordinary plastic cups/cutlery/straws etc that are used in the UK. I'm sure many other products could also be made using this PLA or similar organic plastics that break down quickly... I dont know why we havent forced the market over to these other options.

Surely the public opinion would be behind this kind of policy?

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On 04/08/2018 at 22:52, bushblairandbrown said:

Again this is another perfect example of why rules constantly need updating to make markets do the right thing. We all know we need to address the plastic problem, but until there is some restriction on plastic packaging and or levy it will continue to drag on. 

"Government intervention has failed, and in fact made the problem worse, so what we need, you see, is far far more government intervention."

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23 hours ago, nome said:

I was actually quite heartened by the news that apparently 90% of the oceans plastic pollution comes from only 10 rivers... surely it can't be that difficult to target and clean up 10 rivers?

Trouble is, they are all in "shithole countries" and good luck getting non-Europeans to give a single flying fig about polluting the environment

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On 05/08/2018 at 10:11, stormymonday_2011 said:

Strange how the end consumer rather than the producer is deemed to be the problem here.

I dont remember shoppers demonstrating on the streets demanding that items that previously came in glass containers, paper bags, cardboard and grease proof paper be wrapped in layers of plastic often more impenetrable than tank armour.

Bingo!

Obvious this is a bit of a generalisation but single use plastics just need to be banned. They're a convenience but one we can, and have, live(d) without. There will be some issues to sort out, food spoiling for example, but I'm sure The Market will sort that out once the parameters are set.

Seems a pretty classic example of not pricing externalities. If the market can't or won't do it, regulate for the public good.

13 hours ago, BearlyBegun said:

I had a pint outside in Hyde park recently, by the serpentine - served in a plastic pint cup that carried a print saying "I am not a normal plastic cup" or something like that. I googled the company and found out it was made of PLA which is a type of plastic made from organic base.

Looked and felt exactly like any other plastic pint cup I have come across but apparently this cup when exposed to elements (landfill/composted) it breaks down completely in 6-24months.

I really cannot believe that we havent banned normal plastics for at least all the ordinary plastic cups/cutlery/straws etc that are used in the UK. I'm sure many other products could also be made using this PLA or similar organic plastics that break down quickly... I dont know why we havent forced the market over to these other options.

Surely the public opinion would be behind this kind of policy?

Stuff like this should be really simple. There was a similar thing, iirc, with a UK company that had designed coffee cups that didn't have the plastic liner that stopped them being recyclable. They didn't get much uptake at the time as companies didn't see the extra cost as worth it. Now there's lots of faffing around with different options and yet more expansion of the different types of recycling facility needed. Personally I don't need choice on what type of coffee cup I use so outsourcing that decision to a regulator to make a good, sustainable choice makes sense. Indeed, it's what Adam Smith suggests!

 

 

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On 05/08/2018 at 08:30, winkie said:

Will look to purchase products where the manufacturers and retailers have tried to cut back on the plastic they have used in the past.....would like to see food and non food products sold by weight and volume put directly into the customers own reuseable containers.

This option is already open to you. Join your local organic box scheme - reduce waste, support local businesses & save a trip to the supermarket. Return the cardboard box & any minimal packaging the next time they drop off.

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29 minutes ago, malk said:

......Obviously this is a bit of a generalisation but single use plastics just need to be banned.....

Who decides what gets classed as "single use" plastic?   What defines "single use"?  It may seem a sensible suggestion, but what exactly is meant by the term?

 

I'm planting brassicas in the garden. They are inside a plastic collar made from pop bottles that have had the tops and bottoms cut off. This protects them from pigeons, and means the slug pellets can be placed next to  the new shoots.Does this make them a piece of 'multi use' plastic?

 

Used plastic is just rubbish.....recycle, incinerate, or put in a hole in the ground.

Keep calm and tidy up..._

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2 hours ago, highYield said:

This option is already open to you. Join your local organic box scheme - reduce waste, support local businesses & save a trip to the supermarket. Return the cardboard box & any minimal packaging the next time they drop off.

At the moment the season is right for growing lots of vegetables and fruit.......markets are good, nothing wrong with shopping in a supermarket, bring own paper bags, place fruit &veg into and weigh at checkout.....the bigger problem is the cleaners and detergents, orange juice, tubs of this and that, yogurt, water bottles (the water can pick up the plastic of the container over time in the wrong environment ) tap no problem....far too much wrapped in single use plastic, everywhere you go......not sustainable over time, we need to look at new ways of doing things.

 

Even if the plastic is recycled it will eventually need to be disposed of ......... perhaps plastic eating bacteria is the way to go......this is a global responsibility.😉

 

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On 05/08/2018 at 16:03, Uncle_Kenny said:

I used to work in the waste business, members of my family still do.

The industry changed from disposing waste in a cheap an efficient way to essentially becoming accountants. This is because of the government's landfill tax. It steadily increases year after year with virtually zero publicity. When was the last time you heard about the land fill tax in the media, or mentioned by a politician?

Now, everyone in the business is just finding a way to justify avoiding the tax. They sound like accountants, moving waste and money around to avoid the taxes. A lot of total crap is sold as sorted waste. No wonder the Chinese banned it.

The industry is very corrupt to. There are a lot of one man bands. Offers of bribes, threats, places being set on fire, other peoples machines being smashed up and so on. Never make enemies with a man who has access to a landfill site. They will never find your body if you end up in there. The business attracts a lot of organised crime. I imagine the industry has been cleaned up somewhat since. I know of a bloke, just a machine driver in the yard. He paid his mortgage off nicking bales of "recycled" metal cans on the night shift. He was sacked but not prosecuted.

Good post - any more stories? I find stuff like that more interesting than financial news! (A necessary evil)

Are there any industry movements towards landfill mining?

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