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longgone

Is like the millennials favourite word ?

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Why do those under 30 continually use the word "like" to glue their pointless sentences together with no verbal full stops or commas.

 

Boomers please enforce your darlings use other words.

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I think it's an Americanism that has been around for decades, and has unfortunately become ingrained here. I remember kids in American kids TV programmes in the 90's (and possibly the adults in the adult programmes too) speaking in that way  "you know like, she said like, I was like,  like, " and gradually it has become a bad habit in the UK.

My six year old daughter has started saying using 'like' a bit too much in her sentences, something she has picked up from school friends no doubt.

 

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i sat on the bus yesterday and was listening to uni students talking in this gibberish way.  plenty of un-joined up thinking going on here.  i counted over 100 likes in a 5 minute outburst of rubbish. 

as you say it is an Americanized vernacular. inner city london is a pseudo mix of afro-Caribbean and american. Maybe the language of facebook and collecting likes has gone too far.  

 

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One i've noticed is European sports people speaking English say "For Sure" alot, and use it to start many replys to questions.... i have now startes hearing British sports people and non sports people using it.... i dont know why it annoys me but it does

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9 hours ago, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

When many of us first started looking at this site in the early 2000s we were probably still in our 20s. Now we have transformed into whinging Middle Agers complaining about how the youth talk!!!!

Innit bruv like proper winge like.

Need my slippers and Horlicks 

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I'm not sure it's the boomer-parents you need to be asking. 

The majority of boomers' offspring will surely be past the 'I'm so, like, totally...' etc. stage.  

Mine are, thank heaven, old enough never to have entered it.  And  I was officially classed as an 'elderly' first-time mother at 28, so many boomer-offspring will be even older than mine. 

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Ending sentences with "like" has always been a Geordie thing as far as I'm aware. Heaven knows where this habit of sticking the word everywhere has come from though, but it seems to have been a bit of a plague for the last few years.

I'd like (hah!) to give a good kicking to anyone who says "train station" too. If that doesn't work I'll talk about going to a planeport when I need to fly somewhere.

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52 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

Ending sentences with "like" has always been a Geordie thing as far as I'm aware. Heaven knows where this habit of sticking the word everywhere has come from though, but it seems to have been a bit of a plague for the last few years.

I'd like (hah!) to give a good kicking to anyone who says "train station" too. If that doesn't work I'll talk about going to a planeport when I need to fly somewhere.

Ditto to 'train station'!   So ubiquitous now I'm trying (not very successfully) to ignore it. 

Another xxxxing American import that really grates on me is 'play piano' instead of 'play THE piano'.  As a piano player who visits a music forum a lot I'm seeing it more and more, though nearly always from much younger posters, rarely from old hands/music teachers. 

 

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21 minutes ago, Unbowed said:

I get annoyed by words that suddenly become fashionable and over used, and often incorrectly used.

e.g. Contemporary, Narrative

It appears that anything that is described as "contemporary" is something I have contempt for.

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3 hours ago, Riedquat said:

I'd like (hah!) to give a good kicking to anyone who says "train station" too. If that doesn't work I'll talk about going to a planeport when I need to fly somewhere.

Do you mean instead of saying just 'the station' ?

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On ‎22‎/‎07‎/‎2018 at 10:43, Mikhail Liebenstein said:

When many of us first started looking at this site in the early 2000s we were probably still in our 20s. Now we have transformed into whinging Middle Agers complaining about how the youth talk!!!!

And using too many exclamation marks!  ;) :D

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4 hours ago, Riedquat said:

Ending sentences with "like" has always been a Geordie thing as far as I'm aware. Heaven knows where this habit of sticking the word everywhere has come from though, but it seems to have been a bit of a plague for the last few years.

I'd like (hah!) to give a good kicking to anyone who says "train station" too. If that doesn't work I'll talk about going to a planeport when I need to fly somewhere.

 

20 minutes ago, Andy T said:

Do you mean instead of saying just 'the station' ?

Good Q Andy.

Directions to "the station" in Peterborough would be different if you mean for buses or for trains. Other than 'train station' what would you use?

Sorry, just worked out what you mean. 'railway station' is correct, 'train station' is not. 

But then why do we call the place were people connect for buses a 'bus station'? Is that wrong?

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9 minutes ago, Aidan Ap Word said:

 

Good Q Andy.

Directions to "the station" in Peterborough would be different if you mean for buses or for trains. Other than 'train station' what would you use?

Sorry, just worked out what you mean. 'railway station' is correct, 'train station' is not. 

But then why do we call the place were people connect for buses a 'bus station'? Is that wrong?

Bus stations only deal with buses, not all aspects of the roads, so the discrimination is needed. Not so much nowdays but there used to be a lot more going on at railway stations than just catching trains (even if most of them involved a train at some point, the closest these days is for the rail replacement bus). An airport is probably an airport and not a planeport for the same reason - it's the location for dealing with air travel, with a more specific term only being used when necessary (e.g. heliport).

For "station" on its own I'd always assume that meant railway station, if the bus station is meant it would always be bus station and never just "station."

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15 minutes ago, Riedquat said:

Bus stations only deal with buses, not all aspects of the roads, so the discrimination is needed. Not so much nowdays but there used to be a lot more going on at railway stations than just catching trains (even if most of them involved a train at some point, the closest these days is for the rail replacement bus). An airport is probably an airport and not a planeport for the same reason - it's the location for dealing with air travel, with a more specific term only being used when necessary (e.g. heliport).

For "station" on its own I'd always assume that meant railway station, if the bus station is meant it would always be bus station and never just "station."

Yup.

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I did think there was an episode (sad to admit I have ever watched this) of Absolutely Fabulous that a (then) girlfriend made me watch where Joanna Lumley's character was using 'like' as a form of breathing between words.

If that 'added' the verbal habit of today (yeurgh) then I would be surprised. Absolutely Fabulous is satire after all ... ?

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8 hours ago, Aidan Ap Word said:

I did think there was an episode (sad to admit I have ever watched this) of Absolutely Fabulous that a (then) girlfriend made me watch where Joanna Lumley's character was using 'like' as a form of breathing between words.

If that 'added' the verbal habit of today (yeurgh) then I would be surprised. Absolutely Fabulous is satire after all ... ?

Yes !

saying like has become the new exhale.  

i really did count 100 likes in one 5 minute conversation, i nearly had to get off the bus. 😄

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17 hours ago, Riedquat said:

Bus stations only deal with buses, not all aspects of the roads, so the discrimination is needed. Not so much nowdays but there used to be a lot more going on at railway stations than just catching trains (even if most of them involved a train at some point, the closest these days is for the rail replacement bus). An airport is probably an airport and not a planeport for the same reason - it's the location for dealing with air travel, with a more specific term only being used when necessary (e.g. heliport).

For "station" on its own I'd always assume that meant railway station, if the bus station is meant it would always be bus station and never just "station."

Ah, railway station. I couldn't think of the word, proves how rarely used it is now, years since I've actually heard someone correctly say 'railway station'.

 

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38 minutes ago, Andy T said:

Ah, railway station. I couldn't think of the word, proves how rarely used it is now, years since I've actually heard someone correctly say 'railway station'.

That's because for years people have usually just said "station". I've only noticed semi-literates saying "train station" in the last few years.

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In Spanish it is Estacion de Ferrocarril not Estacion de Tren.

So there. :D

 

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21 hours ago, Riedquat said:

Bus stations only deal with buses, not all aspects of the roads, so the discrimination is needed. Not so much nowdays but there used to be a lot more going on at railway stations than just catching trains (even if most of them involved a train at some point, the closest these days is for the rail replacement bus). An airport is probably an airport and not a planeport for the same reason - it's the location for dealing with air travel, with a more specific term only being used when necessary (e.g. heliport).

For "station" on its own I'd always assume that meant railway station, if the bus station is meant it would always be bus station and never just "station."

so what`s a tube stop ? as a tube is not a train 😄

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Just now, longgone said:

so what`s a tube stop ? as a tube is not a train 😄

Yes, and 'underground station' (short for 'underground railway station') ... only technically correct some of the time.

Sometime the way language evolves is really messy, you know. like, y'all.

Yeurgh ... want to clean my keyboard now.

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  • 301 Brexit, House prices and Summer 2020

    1. 1. Including the effects Brexit, where do you think average UK house prices will be relative to now in June 2020?


      • down 5% +
      • down 2.5%
      • Even
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      • up 5%



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